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Longinus, Dionysius: (Pearce, Zachary, ed.:) [Greek letters: Dionysiou Logginou Peri Hypsous Hypomnema] De Sublimitate Commentarius, Quem Nova Versione Donavit, [...] Londini [London]: ex officina Jacobi Tonson, & Johannis Watts, 1724. First edition thus. 4to., pp. [viii], xv, [i], 187, [i], 28, [xvi] + engraved frontispiece. Bound without an initial advertising leaf as listed in some copies. Parallel Greek and Latin texts. Engraved intials and head- and tail-pieces, with final errata leaf. Occasional light pencil annotations. A little sporadic offsetting, mostly to Index. Contemporary sheep, rebacked retaining original spine but now failing at upper joint, edges sprinkled red, endpapers renewed. Very rubbed, joints worn with the upper beginning to split, corners worn. A tired binding but internally very good indeed. To the ffep, a very large, recent presentation bookplate to Desmond Costa. To the title-page verso, a small, older bookplate reading 'Ex bibliotheca hospitii dominorum advocatorum de arcubus Londini'. To the rfep, a pen inscription reading: 'Dublin - Hodges Figgis and Son [bookshop]./ Dawson St./ September 1964. Richard Carden'. First edition of Pearce's popular edition of Longinus, which was still in print in the nineteenth century. De Sublimitate is a work of literary criticism in Roman-era Greek, dated to the 1st century AD. The unknown author is conventionally referred to as 'Longinus' or 'Pseudo-Longinus', but their true identity has long been debated. A 10th century manuscript, the oldest surviving, names the original author as 'Dionysius or Longinus', which was later misread as 'Dionysius Longinus'. Later analyses have attributed the work to Dionysius of Halicarnassus or Cassius Longinus, though now neither is widely accepted. This quarto first edition is described as 'elegant' by Dibdin. Pearce presents, he says, 'the true text of his author, a new Latin version, and some elegant and erudite notes.' Later octavo editions were produced 'for the sake of general circulation, and they have propagated universally the critical talents and fine taste of their editor.' ESTC T87474; Dibdin II (4th edn.) 177-8   Ref: 51766 
£200
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Longinus, Dionysius: (Pearce, Zachary, ed.:) [Greek letters] De Sublimitate Commentarius, quem qova versione donavit, Perpetuis Notis illustravit, & partim Manuscriptorum ope, partim conjectura, emendavit (additis etiam omnibus ejusdem Auctoris Fragmentis). Dublini: apud J. Smith & G. Bruce, 1733. Third edition. 8vo., pp. xliv, 372, including engraved frontispiece. Title-page in red and black, woodcut initials and tail-pieces, large engraved head-piece to p.v. A few annotations in an old hand, e.g. p.15. A very light marginal dampstain to lower fore-edge corner from frontis to approx. p.xxxv but generally clean within. Contemporary dark brown calf, gilt spine label, gilt thistle and shelf mark at tail of spine, edges lightly sprinkled red. Headcap neatly repaired, upper joint a little worn but holding firm, upper fore-edge corner bumped with slight creasing. A few small paper repairs to ffep where it was previously stuck to the bookplate. A very good copy. Engraved armorial bookplate of the Charles Perceval (1756–1840), 2nd Baron Arden in the Irish peerage and 1st Baron Arden in the peerage of the UK. Perceval was the older brother of the Prime Minister Spencer Perceval (1762–1812) as well as being a prominent politician himself. He was also a fellow of the Royal Society and the Society of Antiquaries, and a trustee of the Hunterian Museum. Published in the same year in both Dublin and Edinburgh, this Dublin edition appears to be the rarer, COPAC finding only the ESTC listing plus copies at Trinity College Dublin and Glasgow University. The sheets of this edition were in fact printed in the Netherlands and are a separate issue or variant imprint of the 1733 Amsterdam edition of R. & J. Wetstein and G. Smith. Dibdin recommends Pearce's edition (first published in 1724 in London in 4to. format) as 'the true text', praising its 'elegant and erudite notes' and adding that the subsequent 8vo. editions contain 'advantageous corrections and additions'. He records the second London edition of 1732 (the first 8vo.) and Foulis' 'very elegant' 4to. of 1763, but omits this Irish issue. ESTC N28412; Dibdin (4th edn.) II 177-8   Ref: 51610 
£225
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[Lucan] Lucanus, Marcus Annæus: (Burmann, Pieter I ed.:) Pharsalia, cum Commentario Petri Burmanni. Leidae [Leiden]: apud Conradum Wishoff, Danielem Goetval, et Georg. Jacob. Wishoff, fil. Conrad, 1740. 4to., pp.[lii], 735, [clxi]. Presentation certificate bound in. Title page in red and black with large engraved vignette, some woodcut initials, three-page errata to rear. Occasional light foxing, some leaves a little grubby towards top- and fore-edges. Contemporary prize vellum, gilt spine and boards with Utrecht coat-of-arms centrepiece to both boards, edges sprinkled red and blue. Spine darkened, quite soiled, joint beginning to crack but holding firm, endpapers a bit dusty, very good. Presentation certificate dated 1776 bound in before title-page, inscribed to Henrico Petro van Hurck and signed by various academics. Small leaf of calculations in an old hand loosely inserted. A 'valuable edition' (Dibdin) containing some previously unpublished notes by Heinsius and Oudendorp, which are combined with Burmann's in the footnotes. Dibdin II (4th ed.) 186-7; Schweiger II, 565   Ref: 50677 
£300
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Lucian of Samosata: (Benedictus, J., ed.:) [...] Opera Omnia in Duos Tomos Divisa. Salmurii [Saumur], Ex Typis Pietri Piededii, 1619. First edition thus. 2 vols., 8vo., pp. [xx] 1078 (recte 1122) [xxxiv]; [viii] 1114 [xlviii]. A few closed marginal tears, early leaves a little brittle at edges, occasional minor staining. Contemporary vellum, ink titles to spines, Yapp sides, edges spinkled red. A little soiled particularly at spines, endcaps creased, some smudges and candle wax spots. A few handwritten notes to preliminary blanks. The works of the 2nd century Greek "belletrist and wit" (OCD) Lucian of Samosata. The text stands out from previous printings for being newly improved with conjectures and manuscript collations; Schweiger thought the result "quite correct", although Dibdin, perhaps idiosyncratically, held the opposite view. Dibdin (4th edn.) II 192-193. Schweiger I 193.   Ref: 46578  show full image..
£450
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[Lucian of Samosata] Lucianus: (Hemsterhuis, Tiberius; Gesner, Johann Matthias; Reitz, Johan Frederik; Reitz, Conrad, eds.:) [...] Luciani Samosatensis Opera. [...] Cum Nova Versione Tiber. Hemsterhusii, & Io. Matthiae Gesneri [...] Cuius priorem partem summo studio curavit & illustravit Tiberius Hemsterhusius. [...] notasque suas adiecit Ioannes Fredericus Reitzius. Amstelodami [Amsterdam]: Sumptibus Jacobi Wetstenii; trajecti ad Rhenum (Utrecht): ex typographia He 1743; 1743; 1743; 1746. 4 vols. (3 vols. Opera + later Index vol.), 4to., pp. [x], LXXII, 882 + 1 plate; [iv], 953, [i]; [iv], 860; [viii], XVI, 500, [iv]. Index volume lacks gathering 4D, and has the 'Index Criticus' bound before the main text (rather than its usual place at the rear). Half-titles to vols. I-III, title-pages in red and black with engraved printer's devices except vol.IV which has a woodcut decoration. Woodcut initials, engraved head- and tail-pieces, occasional illustrations in the text. Parallel columns of Greek text and Latin translation, Latin footnotes. Some light foxing mostly restricted to front and rear, occasional dustiness to some head margins and final leaves, a little toning to Index vol. around text, to vol.III a slight separation between gatherings A and B. Contemporary vellum, titles inked to spines, raised bands, boards blindstamped, edges heavily sprinkled red. Light smudgy marks and a few small stains, lower corner of vol. III's upper board curved inwards a little but a very good, attractive set. Bound uniformly with our stock number 51574, Burmann's Virgil (1746). To front paste-down of each volume: armorial bookplate of the mathematician Miles Bland (1786–1867); book plate of T.A. Bury. The famous three-volume edition of Lucian by the eminent 18th-century classicist Tiberius Hemsterhuis (1685-1766), together with a fourth volume of indices produced three years later by Conrad Reitz. In 1824 Jacob Geel published a further 66-page volume of Hemsterhusius' annotations which had been supposed to have been burnt, but had in fact been preserved in Leiden public library. 'This is not only the most beautiful, but the most accurate and complete edition of Lucian that has ever been published: the editors were Hemsterhusius, J.M. Gesner, and Reitzius. The greater part of the first volume was particularly the production of Hemsterhusius, and it contains a rich find of the most curious and profound criticism relating to Lucian; the second and third volumes were completed chiefly by J. Reitzius; the fourth volume [...] was compiled by Conrad Reitzius, the brother: Gesner had the care of the Latin version, which is a very excellent one, and accompanied with useful notes. The high character which this edition has long borne in the classical world, makes it unnecessary to give minute description of its contents [...]' (Dibdin). 'Édition la plus estimée de cet auteur' (Brunet). Dibdin (4th edn.) II 193   Ref: 51573 
£800
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Lydius, Jacobus: (Van Til, Saloman, ed.:) Syntagma Sacrum De Re Militari: Nec Non De Jure Jurando Dissertation Philologica. Opus postumumu, & multa eruditione commendatum cum figuris æneis elegantissime incisis, quod nunc primum ex tenebris eruit, notisque illustravit. Salomon van Til. Dordraci [Dordrecht]: apud Cornelium Willegardum Bibliopolam; 'apud Nicolaum Vries' to rear, 1698. First edition. 4to., pp. [xxviii], 338, 56, [xxviii] + 12 plates, 4 of which folding. Additional engraved title-page, woodcut device to title-page and further woodcut head- and tail-pieces and initials, generous margins. A couple of small, closed marginal tears; paper flaw to bottom edge of pp.89-90, not affecting text. Very occasional spots, a few small stains to engraved title, some light marginal smudges but generally clean and bright within. 19th-century marbled paper-covered boards with tan calf corners, recently rebacked in tan speckled calf with raised bands and red morocco gilt label, edges very lightly sprinkled red. Boards a bit rubbed, corners worn, but a very good, sound copy. Oxford University bookplate to front paste-down, with 'Rejected 1925' overwritten in pencil. First edition of Lydius's (1610-79) posthumously published work on ancient military science. Brunet 29046   Ref: 50149 
£450
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Lysias: (Taylor, John, ed.:) Orationes et Fragmenta. Graece et Latine. Ad fidem Codd. Manuscriptorem recensuit, [...] Londini [London]: Ex Officina Gulielmi Bowyer, 1739. 2 vols. in 1, 4to., pp. [viii], xc, 528, [ii], 431-722, [xxvi] (with errors in pagination as usual). Greek and Latin. Leaf Fff4 (ie. pp.415-6) in this copy is the cancelland, showing the original number '39' in the first line of text. A few large, engraved head-pieces, occasional woodcut decorations. Two preliminary blanks a little loose at tail edge, first few leaves slightly creased. Contemporary vellum, raised bands and inked title to spine, all edges coloured red, marbled endpapers. Upper board a bit bowed, a little grubby. A very good, large paper copy. 19th-century armorial bookplate of Sir John Trollope to front paste-down. One of only 100 copies printed on large paper. According to Bowyer's records, 300 copies were printed on Genoa demy, 75 on royal, and 25 on writing royal. "Beautifully and correctly printed by the celebrated Bowyer. This is an incomparable edition, and hardly exceeded by any which this country can boast of" (Dibdin). ESTC T106443; Schweiger I 202; Dibdin (4th edn.) II 213; Brunet III 1257; Graesse IV 314.   Ref: 51885 
£950
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[Lyttelton, George, Lord:] Observations on the Life of Cicero. London: Printed by J. Wright. 1733. 8vo., pp. [vi], 50. Author's name written on title-page in an early hand. Recent quarter calf by David Bourn of Darlington, marbled boards, red morocco spine label lettered vertically in gilt. The first edition of these observations by Lord George Lyttelton (1709-1773), produced the same year as his uncle Viscount Cobham began his opposition to Walpole's government; Lyttelton then entered politics as one of 'Cobham's Cubs', known primarily for their youth, patriotism, and Ciceronian rhetoric. ESTC T41818.   Ref: 36988 
£95
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Mandeville, John: The Voiage and Travaile of Sir John Maundevile, Kt.. Which treateth of the Way to Hierusalem; and of Marvayles of Inde, with other Ilands and Countryes. Now publish'd entire from an Original MS. in the Cotton Library. London: printed for Woodman and Lyon in Russel-Street Covent-Garden, and C. Davis, in Hatton-Garden, 1727. 8vo., pp. xvi, 384, [xvi]. Contents bound at rear with Index, rather than as usual after the Editor's Preface. Title-page in red and black, woodcut head- & tail-pieces and initials. Occasional foxing, a few ink spots and smudges, first and final leaves a little dusty. Contemporary Cambridge-style panelled calf, recently rebacked with older red morocco gilt spine label retained, board edges and corners repaired, endpapers replaced with armorial bookplate slightly visible beneath front paste-down. A little rubbed but a very good, soundly repaired copy. Ownership inscription of Wm. Leaker of Liverpool at head of Editor's Preface (A2). First appearing in France c.1357 as Voyages de Jehan de Mandeville Chevalier, the name of this work's true author remains unknown. It tells the story of the narrator's supposed world travels and was enormously popular: there were further French versions, as well as translations into German, English, Italian, Dutch, Spanish, Irish, Danish, and Czech. 'Altogether over 250 manuscripts survive in twenty-two versions. In England alone there were four Latin and four English translations and a rhymed version.' (ODNB) 'Sir John Mandeville' claims to be an English knight, born in St Albans, who departed on his travels in 1322. However, there is no historical evidence for his adventures, and it appears that at least 90% of the narrative of the Voyages can be traced back to preexisting written sources. So who was the real author? Examination of the original French text is revealing. M.C. Seymour posits 'that the author had no knowledge of St Albans but was a fluent French-speaker; that he composed his work c.1357 in a large, almost certainly ecclesiastical, library; that he was an ecclesiastic, with a cleric's knowledge of the Bible, and probably a member of a regular order; that he was a fluent reader of Latin but lacked any knowledge of Greek or Arabic; that he was an informed and intelligent reader of books describing the Holy Land and other foreign parts; that he had mastered the theories of Sacrobosco and his commentators, possibly at the University of Paris, on the rotundity of the world and was aware of the possibility of circumnavigation; that he had never travelled to the lands he describes; that he was aware of current French accounts of foreign lands and was in a position to launch his own work into the mainstream of the Parisian book-trade.' (ODNB) This anaylsis presents Jean le Long (d.1388) as a likely candidate. As librarian of the Benedictine abbey church of St Bertin at St Omer (in France but then under English rule and on the main route between Calais and Paris) he would have had access to genuine travellers and pilgrims visiting the Mediterranean and the Near East who would have used the route and stayed at the abbey. '[The abbey's] library contained all the works used by Mandeville in the compilation of the Voyages, including the comparatively scarce French translation of the Directorium ad faciendum passagium transmarinum made by the hospitaller Jean de Vignay (c.1340).' (ODNB) ESTC T100821   Ref: 51726 
£650
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[Martial] Martialis, Marcus Valerius: Epigrammata. In amphitheatrvm Caesaris. Venice: [Heirs of] Aldus Manutius, and Andrea Torresanus, 1517. Second edition thus. 8vo., ff. 190, [ii]. Woodcut printer's anchor device on leaves A1 recto and [et]8 verso, a few errors in foliation as usual. Some marginal annotations in sepia ink, most now sadly faded to illegibility. SOme occasional light foxing, including a little to title-page. Early 19th-century antique-style vellum binding, raised bands, remains of spine label, board edges turned a little inward, edges coloured green, narrow green silk ribbon bookmark bound in. Vellum darkened, slightly grubby, top edge dusty. A very good copy in a sympathetic later binding. Bookplate of James John Falconer to the front paste-down, with '1877' inked beneath. The second Aldine edition, a reprint of the 1501 edition (the editio princeps was published in 1471 in Ferrara). A lovely example of the beauty and convenience of Aldine's unelaborated octavo volumes of popular Classical authors, highlighted with some early annotations: 'By pruning away one element - the commentaries - and combining two others - the smaller format and the most acceptable titles - Aldus was freeing literature from the study and the lecture-room.' (Lowry, 143) Adams M 694; Brunet III 1490; Dibdin II (4th edn.) 229; Renouard (3rd edn.) 81   Ref: 51705  show full image..
£1000
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