Antiquarian Booksellers Association
Unsworth's Booksellers
International League of Antiquarian Booksellers

[Ovid] Ovidius Naso, Publius: [Burmann, P., ed.:] Opera, in III Tomos Divisa. Amstelaedami [Amsterdam]: J. Wetstenium, 1751. 3 vols. as 1. 12mo. in 8s, pp. [xl], 248; 284, [xii]; 301, [iii], including half-title and engraved title-page to each volume, and final blank leaf at rear. A few tiny marginal annotations, e.g. p.17, p.142. Occasional light spots and stains, a few leaves unopened to vols. II & III. Recent brown calf, spine gilt ruled and with black morocco label, blind-tooled frame to each board, new endbands, edges lightly sprinkled red and brown, new marbled endpapers. Tiny scuff to tail of spine, first half-title a little stuck to endpaper at gutter slightly obscuring 'O' of 'Ovidii'. A very good copy in a neat modern binding. The half-title to the first volume reads: 'Publii Ovidii Nasonis opera in III tomos divisa'. Schweiger II 632   Ref: 52059 
£200
enquire
Paris, Matthew: (Watts, William, ed.:) Historia Major. Juxta Exemplar Londinense 1640. verbatim recusa [...] Huic Editione accesserunt, duorum Offarum Merciorum Regum; & viginti trium Abbatum S. Albani Vitae: una cum Libro Additamentorum. Londini [London], Impensis A. Mearne, T. Dring, B. Tooke, T. Sawbridge, & G. Wells 1684. Folio, pp. [xxxiv], 424, 451-859, 856-861, [i], [xcvi], [xii], 961-1048, 1041-1175, [xxxvii] + portrait frontispiece. With all usual errors in pagination. The section titled 'Adversaria sive Variantes Lectiones' and the Indices are bound after the main part of the text, instead of at the beginning as in the ESTC copy. Title in red and black with woodcut device, some woodcut initials. A few tiny smudges and wax spots, small blue ink mark to lower margin of frontis, short closed tear to lower margin pp.695-6. Contemporary dark brown mottled calf, sturdily rebacked, raised bands, gilt title label, edges sprinkled red. Very scuffed, edges worn but corners repaired, a very good, sound copy overall. Reprint of the first complete edition of Matthew Paris' works. Watts added to Archbishop Parker's edition of the 'Historia Major' (1571) Matthew's unpublished minor works (real and suppositious), besides his own notes on variant readings and parallel sources (Roger Wendover, William Rishanger, and others). He produced overall an impressive piece of early modern English historical scholarship, complete with glossary and index. Matthew Paris (d. 1259), a historian and the official chronicler at St. Alban's monastery, was a favourite of King Henry III, and a sharp reporter on contemporary political life. Watts (1590-1649) was also chaplain to Prince Rupert of the Rhine, the Civil War commander. Wing P 359; ESTC R25517   Ref: 51274 
£400
enquire

[Paston letters] (Fenn, John, ed.:) (Frere, Serjeant:) Original Letters, written during the Reigns of Henry VI, Edward IV, and Richard III, by various Persons of Rank or Consequence [...] with Notes, Historical and Explanatory; and Authenticated by Engravings of Autographs, Fac Similes, Paper-Marks and Seals. London, printed for G.G.J. and J. Robinson, 1787, 1789, 1823. 5 vols. Vols. I-II second editions with additions and corrections, vols. III-V first editions. 4to., pp. lxxxvii, [i], 301, [i]; [iv], 363, [i]; [iv], xvi, xxxvi, 451, [i]; [vi], xxxii, 478, [ii]; lxxvi, 472 + all plates as called for, including some hand-coloured and 1 folding pedigree chart (repaired). Vol. I and III title-pages reinforced at fore-edge, vol. II plates quite foxed, a little occasional offsetting. Contemporary tan calf, skillfully rebacked in slightly lighter calf with blind tooling, gilt and red and black morocco labels to spines, corners repaired, endpapers sympathetically replaced. Armorial bookplate of the Earls of Dartrey (family name Dawson) relaid to each front paste-down. Bookplate of Adrian Bullock, Sheringham, Norfolk dated 1987 to each front and rear pastedown. Recent note transcribing Paston family gravestone inscriptions loosely inserted. John Fenn's edition of the Paston Letters was the first printing of an invaluable collection shedding light on the life of an aristocratic family (the Pastons, later Earls of Yarmouth) in the fifteenth century. The editor obtained the documents from the executors of a chemist in Diss, Norfolk, and later presented the originals for vols. I to II to George III, receiving a knighthood soon after. His edition was nevertheless suspected for years to be forgery, until the material (including what he had given to the King) resurfaced in various country houses in the later nineteenth century. The fifth volume was sent to the press posthumously by Serjeant Frere, Fenn's nephew (Ency. Brit., 11th edn.) Lowndes 788: "Two editions of Vols. 1 & 2 were printed in 1787, but there is no perceptible difference between them."   Ref: 46282  show full image..
£1250
enquire
Paulus Diaconus; Lipsius, J: Pauli Warnefridi Langobardi Filii, Diaconi Foroiuliensis, De Gestis Langobardorum Libri VI. Ad MS, & Veterum Codicum Fidem Editi; De Recta Pronunciatione Latinae Linguae Dialogus. Lugduni Batavorum [Leiden], Ex Officina Plantiniana, Apud Franciscum Raphelengium, 1595; [c.1586]. 12mo., pp. [xii], 337, [i]; [ii], 96, [viii]. Woodcut device to title page of first work. Slightly toned with some occasional foxing, small scorch mark to text p.16 (no loss of sense), preliminary blanks and one leaf loosening. Some underlining to one page in second section. Later vellum, possibly retaining old boards, ink title to spine, Yapp edges, edges sprinkled red. Endcaps creased, a little darkened at fore-edge but otherwise bright, pastedowns lifting to reveal mauscript binder's waste. Some booksellers notes and a pasted catalogue entry to front paste-down. Two works bound together: the first is the major work of Paul the Deacon, his History of the Lombards, in an edition published by Plantin - the first edited by Fr. Linbenbrog; the second work is an anonymous edition of Lipsius's study on the correct pronunciation of Latin. Adams, p.499   Ref: 46592 
£675
enquire

Peck, Francis: Desiderata Curiosa: or a Collection of Divers Scarce and Curious Pieces (Relating chiefly to Matters of English History) in six books. London: Printed 1732-35. 2 vols. bound as 1, folio, pp. [viii], viii, [xii], 66, 26, 52, 50, 44, 56, [xii] + engraved portrait frontispiece and 6 other engraved plates; [xxii], 68, 58, 52, 32, 50, 36, 32, 56, 25, [xix] + engraved portrait frontispiece and 3 other engraved plates. A little marginal dustsoiling but quite clean. Contemporary tan calf over re-used late 16thC/early 17thC pasteboards (witness the impression of a large lozenge strapwork centre-piece), recently rebacked with spine panel-gilt, relaid label gilt-lettered & -dated, boards single-rule gilt bordered, board edges decorative roll in blind, old scrapes and scratches since polished over, a.e. red speckled, brown & white sewn endbands. Armorial bookplate of "Wm. Constable Esqr. / F.R.S. & F.A.S." on front patsedown. This, the major publication of Francis Peck, 1692-1743, Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries and correspondent of William Stukeley (who presented the plate of Henry Wykys, vicar of Stamford, printed herein), contains an important biography of Sir William Cecil, Lord Burghley, Queen Elizabeth I's Lord High Treasurer. ESTC T97524.   Ref: 36144  show full image..
£600
enquire
Peck, Francis: New Memoirs of the Life and Poetical Works of Mr. John Milton [...]; Memoirs of the Life and Actions of Oliver Cromwell [...] London: [s.n.] 1740; 1740. First editions. 2 parts in 1. 4to., pp. vi, [vi], 264, [v], 268-437, [i]; [iv], 57, [i]; [ii], 34; [ii], 7, [i]; [ii], 6, [ii] + 2 plates (portrait frontispiece of Milton and medal opposite p.105); pp. xii, 47, [i]; [ii], 8; [iii], 10-36; [iii], 38-47, [i]; [iii], 50-68; [iii], 70-114; [iii], 116-130; [ii], 113, [iii] + 5 plates (portraits of Cromwell, Essex, Fairfax, Hambden (folding) and Peck). With divisional title-pages, and publisher's catalogue at end of each part. Title-pages in red and black, several large engraved head-pieces and initials. Occasional foxing and light toning mostly affecting the first and last few leaves of each part; to leaf A4 of the 'Collection of Historical Pieces', a horizontal closed tear to the head margin, not affecting text. Contemporary sprinkled calf neatly rebacked. Raised bands and red morocco gilt label to spine, narrow gilt border and armorial gilt centrepiece to each board. A bit rubbed, a few light scrapes, corners worn, endpapers a little grubby with a few MS library codes and offsetting therefrom. Still a very good, large paper volume. Small armorial gilt stamp of The Society of Writers to the Signet to each board; small blue library label to front paste-down; some pencilled bookseller's notes to ffep; vertically, to the gutter margin of the title-page, a small Signet Library ownership note in an old hand, offset to the frontispiece. Large and fine paper issues. Originally issued in parts, as evidenced by the divisional titles. Though separate, these works are often found together, and indeed the binder's notes at the beginning of Milton refer also to Cromwell. Having made his name as an antiquary, Peck (1692–1743) produced these works on Milton and Cromwell towards the end of his life, 'as well as a catalogue of the several editions of Shakespeare's writings, and critical and explanatory notes. According to John Nichols, who had a more positive view of Peck's work than either Cole or Harrod, as these last were published "at a period when that species of Criticism had not arrived to the perfection it has since attained by the united labours and genius of several successive and learned Commentators, [they] deserve particular commendation. He seems indeed to have first pointed out the mode [of criticism], which has since been successfully pursued." (Nichols, Lit. anecdotes, 1.513). Thomas Seccombe in the Dictionary of National Biography also described these critical notes as "remarkable, as being perhaps the first attempts made to illustrate their writings by extracts from contemporary writers, in accordance with the method subsequently followed by Steevens and Malone". However, Peck's off-hand attitude to historical veracity appears in an anecdote related by George Vertue, who informed Peck that the print of Milton he wished to use as the frontispiece to his book on the poet was very probably spurious. Vertue later recollected Peck's reply: '"I'll have a scraping from it however, and let posterity settle the matter"' (Appendix to the Memoirs of Thomas Hollis, 513).' (ODNB) ESTC T97527 & T97530   Ref: 51880 
£500
enquire
Persius Flaccus, Aulus: (Casaubon, Isaac, ed.:) Satirarum Liber [...] Terta editio, auctior & emendatior ex ipsius Auctoris codice: cura & opera Merici Casauboni Is. F. Londini (London) Typis M. Flesher: sumptibus R. Mynne in vico vulgo dicto Little Britain: sub insign 1647. Third edition. 8vo., pp. [xxxii], 40, [xxxvi], 554, [xxvi]. Vignette to title-page, a few woodcut decorations, errata leaf at rear. A little light toning. Contemporary dark brown calf neatly rebacked with gilt title to spine, MS binder's waste left visible at hinges post repair. Slightly rubbed, corners beginning to wear, edges dusty but a very good copy. Armorial bookplate of L.A. Burd to front paste-down. Ownership inscription of Richardus Chamberleyne dated 1647 to ffep. Small library code in blue pencil to bookplate and ffep. Oval inkstamp of Repton School Library to title-page. The third Casaubon edition of Persius' 'Satires', the first Casaubon edition of Persius printed in England, and the Second Latin Persius printed in England (the first appeared in 1614). Isaac Casaubon's son Meric Casaubon (1599-1671), who prepared this book for the press, gave impetus to Classical language publishing in England by issuing his own and his illustrious father's work. It was considered the fundamental commentary for 200 years, called by Scaliger, who thought little of Persius,'pluris condimentum quam pulpamentum ', i.e. 'a dish with more sauce than meat' (Epistolæ p.278). ESTC R31791; Wing P 1663; Sandys II 209; Schweiger 711   Ref: 51527 
£300
enquire
Petavius, Dionysius [Pétau, Denis]: Rationarium Temporum in Partes Duas, Libros Tredecim Tributum. In quo aetatum omnium sacra profanaque Historia Chronologicis probationibus munita summatim traditur. Hac editione Novissima. Diligenter a mendis priorum Editionum expurgatum. Accedunt Supplementum Historiae ad banc usque aetatem continuatae, Tabulae Amstelodami et Lipziae [Amsterdam & Leipzig]: apud Arksteeum et Merkum, 1745. 3 parts as 1 vol. 8vo., pp. [xxxii], 795, [i]; [ii], 312, [viii]; 259, [iii] + portrait frontispiece, additional engraved title-page and 7 further plates. Title page to first part in red and black, woodcut initials and head- and tail-pieces. Sporadic light foxing but generally very good within. Contemporary vellum, gilt spine and borders with large gilt centrepiece to each board showing the coat of arms of Middelburg, 'Petavius' inked to spine. A few smudgy marks, headcap slightly pulled, a little ink to upper board, ties lost, paste-downs beginning to lift at edges, remains of a small round label to front paste-down. A very good, sound copy. Large, unusual armorial bookplate to front paste-down, with the name Mr Falconer. The following list printed below the arms: '1681 Dalmahoy of Dalmahoy / 1731 Wilbraham of Delamere / 1771 Edmunds of Worsborough / 1797 Raitt formerly of Halgreen'. We believe this to be the bookplate of the classical scholar Thomas Falconer (1771-1839), who married Frances Riatt in 1797. His mother was Henrietta Edmunds, who married his father in 1771, and the other names listed belong to his female antecedents. The arms of Dalmahoy, Wilbraham, Edmunds and Raitt are depicted beneath those of Falconer and are shown as lozenges, denoting that they belong to women before marriage. Thomas Falconer came from a family of classical scholars, and several of his children pursued the same work. 'Falconer's classical work lay chiefly in the field of ancient geography. In 1797 he published The Voyage of Hanno, Translated and Accompanied with the Greek Text and Dissertations, and he left a manuscript translation of Strabo which was later completed by his son William Falconer. With his father he also wrote a Discourse on the Measure of the Olympic Stadium (1805) which was appended to his father's translation of Arrian's Periplus. Although Falconer was not a particularly distinguished scholar, he was unlucky that his edition of Strabo became notorious through a review by Payne Knight in the Edinburgh Review of July 1809 which formed a famous attack on Oxford and its scholarship. Falconer's elegantly produced two-volume folio edition was published by the Oxford University Press in 1807. It was based on material left by his uncle Thomas Falconer (1738–1792). The first two books had been seen through the press by Dr Parsons, master of Balliol College, and five more had been edited by the Revd Henry Halliwell of Brasenose College, Oxford. The edition was described by Knight as a 'ponderous monument of operose ignorance and vain expense'. His criticisms of Falconer and Oxford learning were answered by a series of lengthy Replies by Edward Copleston (later provost of Oriel) which form an important—if at times complacent—apologia for Oxford education. Copleston's vigorous defence produced a personal letter of thanks from the chancellor and the conferring on him of the degree of DD by diploma. Falconer's edition hardly deserves the vehemence of Payne Knight's attack. Although the text is reprinted from Almeloveen's edition (itself a reprint of Casaubon's), Falconer senior had assembled a wide and valuable array of variant readings which proved very helpful to later editors. His manuscript (preserved in the Bodleian Library) contains collations made by several European scholars of manuscripts of Strabo from foreign libraries, including Paris, Florence, Madrid, and Moscow.' (ODNB) Denis Pétau (1583-1652), also known as Dionysius Petavius, was a French Jesuit theologian. His work on chronology, De Doctrina Temporum (1627), is here condensed into a three-part handbook. It proved very popular on its first appearance in 1633, and went through numerous reprints as well as being translated into French, English and Italian. De Backer-Sommervogel VI, 600; Spoelder, 644 (Middelburg 5)   Ref: 52053 
£225
enquire
Phaedrus: (Burmann, Pieter, ed.:) Fabularum Aesopiarum libri quinque. Cum novo commentario Petri Burmanni. Leidae [Leiden]: Apud Samuelem Luchtmans, 1727. Burman's 4th edition. 4to., pp. [lii], 263, xlix, 93, [iii] + additional engraved title-page. Lacks folding portrait plate. Title-page in red and black with woodcut printer's device, head- and tail-pieces. Francis Hare's 93-page 'Epistola Critica' at rear, the presence of which indicates a large paper copy according to Lamb. A little light dampstaining near gutter, sporadic toning with some gatherings more affected than others, occasional wax spots. Contemporary vellum, title inked to spine, edges sprinkled red and blue. Spine with a red smudge, small hole and remains of a paper label, a little grubby but sound. A scholar's copy, still useful despite the missing plate. 20th-century bookplate of John Denys Parmiter (1902-1989), headmaster of Eagle House School, Wellington College, to front paste-down. Inscription of G[eorge] I[saac] Huntingford dated Aug. 14 1790 also to front paste-down. Huntingford (1748-1832) was tutor and friend of Henry Addington (Prime Minister 1801-4), and served as Bishop of Gloucester 1802–1815, and of Hereford, 1815–32. He published an account of Addington's government, a popular Short Introduction to Writing of Greek and original Greek and Latin verse. 'To this day Burman's edition of 1727 is the only complete commentary on Phaedrus and has not been superceded. Unlike his variorum editions, the notes are Burman's own work. He uses conjecture sparingly and often discusses the emendations of other scholars at considerable length.' (Lamb, Annales Phaedriani, p.vi). Dibdin II (4th ed.) 281; Schweiger II 736; Lamb 167   Ref: 51782 
£100
enquire
Phalaris [...] Epistolae. Ex MSS Recensuit, Versione, Annotationibus, & Vita insuper Authoris Donavit Car. Boyle ex Aede Christi. Oxonii [Oxford]: e typographeo Clarendoniano, 1718. 8vo., pp. [xiv], 154, [vi] + engraved frontispiece. Greek and Latin text. A little soiling at beginning and end. Contemporary Cambridge-style panelled calf, rebacked and re-polished preserving original red morocco label, hinges relined. Bookplate of Cheshunt College Library with 'Withdrawn' stamps to front pastedown. Second impression (first published in 1695) of the book which set off the academic spat which changed the face of English classical scholarship. In his preface Charles Boyle, younger brother of the Earl of Orrery and grand-nephew of Robert Boyle, accuses Richard Bentley, as King's Librarian, of "singular humanity" in denying him adequate access to a manuscript. Thus provoked by this (unfair as it happens) accusation, Bentley published A Dissertation upon the Epistles of Phalaris first in 98 pages and then expanded to about 600, proving the spuriousness of the attribution of the letters to Phalaris, tyrant of Agrigentum. Written in English and proceeding step by step through anachronism, unhistorical use of language and form, dialect, artificiality of content and transmission of text, Bentley set a new benchmark for classical scholarship. The hapless Boyle could have had no idea of the future consequences of his prefatory clause of sarcasm. ESTC T144295. Brunet IV 592.   Ref: 43129 
£475
enquire