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Stanley, Arthur Penrhyn: Historical Memorials of Westminster Abbey. Philadelphia: George W. Jacobs & Co., 1899. US edition, based on the 6th UK edition. 2 vols., 8vo., pp. xlii, [ii], 335, [i]; x, [ii], 422 + plates. Further illustrations in the text. Red cloth, heavily gilt stamped, top edge gilt, other edges uncut and some unopened. Spine a little toned with endcaps a bit creased, slight split in endpaper at upper hinge but binding sound, very good. Pencilled inscription of Spencer Ervin Jr. to ffep. Arthur Penrhyn Stanley (18151881) was Dean of Westminster from 1864 to 1881.   Ref: 51866 
£30
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Stephens, W.R.W. and Hunt, William (eds.:) A History of the English Church. London: Macmillan and Co.: 1903-1920. 9 vols., 8vo.. Sporadic light foxing. Red cloth, gilt titles to spines, head edges gilt and others uncut. Vols. II, V, VII, VIII.i & VII.ii have had their ffeps excised. Most spines a little faded, endcaps creased, some cocked, a few marks and smudges, some patchy toning to endpapers but all good copies overall. Vol. III with ownership inscription of Michael J. Peel, 1956 to ffep. The series comprises: I. The English Church from its Foundation to the Norman Conquest (597-1066) by William Hunt (1912) II. The English Church from the Norman Conquest to the Accession of Edward I by W.R.W. Stephens (1909) III. The English Church in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries by W.W. Capes (1920) IV. The English Church in the Sixteenth Century from the Accession of Henry VIII to the Death of Mary by James Gairdner (1903) V. The English Curch in the Reigns of Elizabeth and James I (1558-1625) by W.H. Frere (1911) VI. The English Church from the Accession of Charles I to the Death of Anne (1625-1714) by William Holden Hutton (1903) VII. The English Church from the Accession of George I to the End of the Eighteenth Century (1714-1800) by John H. Overton & Frederic Relton (1906) VIII.i & VIII.ii The English Church in the Nineteenth Century, Parts I & II by Francis Warre Cornish (1910)   Ref: 51982 
£120
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Stevenson, Francis Seymour: Robert Grosseteste, Bishop of Lincoln. A Contribution to the Religious, Political and Intellectual History of the Thirteenth Century. London: Macmillan and Co., 1899. 8vo., pp. xvi, 348. Black cloth, gilt; generally dusty, boards worn and spine slightly faded. Binding firm, internally clean. Ownership inscription to f.f.e.p.   Ref: 42199 
£30
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Stevenson, W.H. (ed.): Records of the Borough of Nottingham. Being a Series of Extracts from the Archives of the Corporation of Nottingham. Vol. III: King Henry VII to King Henry VIII, 1485-1547. London: Bernard Quaritch, 1885. First edition. 4to., pp. xix, 538 + 2 fold-out facsimiles. Quarter roan, spine worn with loss to endcaps. Dusting to top-edge.   Ref: 45698 
£25
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Strachey, Oliver; Strachey, Ray: Keigwin's Rebellion. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1916. 8vo., pp. xv, 184. Complete with frontis, 2 plates and 2 maps to text. Red cloth, endcaps a little creased but still very good. Dust-jacket spine sunned, slight wear to extremities. Oxford Historical and Literary Studies Vol. 6.   Ref: 51987 
£35
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Strutt, Joseph: (Hone, William, ed.:) The Sports and Pastimes of the People of England; Including the Rural and Domestic Recreations, May Games, Mummeries, Shows, Processions, Pageants, and Pompous Spectacles, from the Earliest Period to the Present Time. London: Printed for Thomas Tegg and Son, 1834. New edition with index. 8vo., pp.lxvii, [i], 420. Many illustrations in the text. Very faintly toned, occasional small smudges, title-page and endpapers a little dusty. Publisher's boards, backed in green cloth with printed paper label, edges uncut. Cocked, spine much faded, small loss to top left corner of label, a few marks, edges worn. A good sound copy in an interesting, unsophisticated binding. This 'New' edition is the third, the first edition having appeared in 1801 and the second (in fact just an incorrect reprint, according to Hone's preface) in 1810, the year of Strutt's death.   Ref: 51268 
£60
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Stukeley, William: An Account of Richard of Cirencester, Monk of Westminster, and of his Works: with his Antient Map of Roman Brittain; and the Itinerary thereof. Read at the Antiquarian Society, March 18, 1756. London: printed by Richard Hett: and sold by Charles Corbet, 1757. First edition. 4to, pp. 94, [ii] + folding map, + blank leaf to front and rear. A few woodcut initials and decorations, facsimile of part of an original MS to final leaf. Blank leaves foxed and a little tattered at edges, first and final few leaves toned at edges (seemingly acid transfer from a previous leather binding); map a little creased at head and tail edges, with 75mm closed tear along one fold and short closed tears at each end of gutter attachment. Recently rebound in dark green library buckram backed with dark green textured sheep, gilt title to spine, new endpapers with cloth-reinforced hinges. A very good copy in an incongruent but very practical binding. Library code in red ink to title-page. To title-page verso, armorial bookplate of 'A. Gifford, D.D. of the Museum'. Baptist minister Andrew Gifford (1700-1784) was assistant librarian at the British Museum from 1757 to 1784. He left many of his books, and other objects, to the Baptist College in Bristol. 'In 1747 Stukeley received a letter from a young Englishman named Charles Bertram, resident in Copenhagen, informing him of his discovery of a medieval copy of a previously unknown Roman map and itinerary of Britain, allegedly made by a fourteenth-century monk of Westminster. Stuart Piggott has described this episode as 'one of the most audacious and successful literary forgeries of the eighteenth century' (Piggott, William Stukeley: an Eighteenth-Century Antiquary, 127). Although Stukeley attempted to purchase the (non-existent) manuscript of De situ Britanniae for the newly opened British Museum, the amicable correspondence between him and Bertram did lead to the publication of Stukeley's An Account of Richard of Cirencester, Monk of Westminster, and of his Works (1757) and Bertram's Britannicarum gentium historiae antiquae scriptores tres (1757, including authentic works by Gildas and Nennius). Bertram's forgery as disseminated in these two books was a great success, and De situ was considered an authentic source for Roman Britain (it was even used in part by Edward Gibbon). The forgery was not fully discredited until 1869.' (ODNB) ESTC T68353   Ref: 51077 
£550
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Thoresby, Ralph; Whitaker, Thomas Dunham: Ducatus Leodiensis: or, the Topography of the Ancient and Populous Town and Parish of Leedes, and Parts Adjacent, in the West-Riding of the Country of York [...]; Loidis and Elmete: or, an Attempt to Illustrate the Districts Described in Those Words by Be Leeds: printed by B. Dewhirst, for Robinson, Son and Holdsworth; and John Hurst, Wakefield, 1816. Second edition. 2 vols., folio (445 x 280mm), pp. [iv], xvi, [i], xvii, [i], 267, [iii], 123, [i], 159, [i], 11, [i] + 10 plates + folding pedigrees of 16 families; pp. [iv], 404, 2, 80 + 58 plates on 54 leaves + 15 folding pedigrees. All plates and pedigrees as called for. Decorative initials and further engraved illustrations in the text. Occasional toning (mostly to plate-adjacent leaves), sporadic foxing. Contemporary half green morocco, spines ornately gilt with red and green labels, marbled paper-covered boards, marbled endpapers. Rubbed, joints, edges and corners worn, some scratches and light scrapes but still a very good, sturdy set. Thoresby (16581725) began work on his great project in the late 1690s, and the first edition of Ducatus Leodiensis was published in 1715. 'This was not the first topographical publication of importance about a provincial town but it was the first work of importance by a Yorkshire antiquary. Attached to the main body of the text was a catalogue of the Musaeum Thoresbyanum and the volume included a very fine map of the area. Ducatus was published by subscription and was dedicated to Peregrine Osborne, marquess of Carmarthen and heir apparent to the duke of Leeds, and to the mayor of Leeds and aldermen of Leeds. About 2000 copies were printed and sold for £3.' (ODNB)   Ref: 51438 
£600
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Toland, John: A Critical History of the Celtic Religion and Learning; Containing an Account of the Druids, or the Priests and Judges, of the Vaids, or the Diviners and Physicians, of the Bards, or the Poets and Heralds, of the Ancient Gauls, Britons, Irish, and Scots. [...] With the History of Abaris, the Hyperborean Priest of the Sun. To Which is Added an Abstract of the Life of the Author. London: Lackington, Allen & Co., 1815. 8vo., pp. [ii], 256. Foxed, improving towards rear. Contemporary dark brown speckled calf, neatly rebacked, gilt spine with green morocco title label. Small chip to tail of spine, corners worn, very good. Tiny label of Eland, Exeter to front paste-down. John Toland (16701722), Irish philosopher and freethinker, was a prolific writer who developed at an early age a critical attitude towards religious thinking; he produced his most famous work, Christianity Not Mysterious (1696), when he was only 25 years old. 'Because Toland's life and writings were filled with challenges to propriety, he generated great hostility. By making reason a criterion of knowledge and faith, he raised doubts about the legitimacy of beliefs and texts and continued to prompt responses from apologists throughout the eighteenth century. His criticism of arbitrary power and his widely read editions of Sidney, Ludlow, Milton, and Harrington had, for many, the unsettling effect of bringing together republican and classical ideals. In the long term it provided a foundation for the whig intellectual tradition that influenced Maximilien Robespierre, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, and Thomas Paine. On the continent Toland's blend of polemics and toleration, his defence of liberty, and critique of religious excess, attracted Voltaire and other Enlightenment figures. ' (ODNB) This volume nicely exemplifies a fairly typical Lackington publication. The publisher and bookseller James Lackington established his shop, 'The Temple of the Muses' in Finsbury Square in 1794. It was famed for both the vastness and cheapness of its stock, and displayed its motto 'The Cheapest Bookstore in the World' proudly on its frontage. Though Lackington himself retired in 1798 publications continued to appear until 1841, when 'The Temple of the Muses' was destroyed by fire.   Ref: 51889 
£200
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Topp, Chester W.: Victorian Yellowbacks & Paperbacks, 1849 - 1905. Volumes I-IX. Denver: Hermitage Antiquarian Bookshop, 1993. Set of 9 vols. Large 8vo. (260 x 180mm), brown cloth, as new.   Ref: 51322 
£180
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