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Phalaris [...] Epistolae. Ex MSS Recensuit, Versione, Annotationibus, & Vita insuper Authoris Donavit Car. Boyle ex Aede Christi. Oxonii [Oxford]: e typographeo Clarendoniano, 1718. 8vo., pp. [xiv], 154, [vi] + engraved frontispiece. Greek and Latin text. A little soiling at beginning and end. Contemporary Cambridge-style panelled calf, rebacked and re-polished preserving original red morocco label, hinges relined. Bookplate of Cheshunt College Library with 'Withdrawn' stamps to front pastedown. Second impression (first published in 1695) of the book which set off the academic spat which changed the face of English classical scholarship. In his preface Charles Boyle, younger brother of the Earl of Orrery and grand-nephew of Robert Boyle, accuses Richard Bentley, as King's Librarian, of "singular humanity" in denying him adequate access to a manuscript. Thus provoked by this (unfair as it happens) accusation, Bentley published A Dissertation upon the Epistles of Phalaris first in 98 pages and then expanded to about 600, proving the spuriousness of the attribution of the letters to Phalaris, tyrant of Agrigentum. Written in English and proceeding step by step through anachronism, unhistorical use of language and form, dialect, artificiality of content and transmission of text, Bentley set a new benchmark for classical scholarship. The hapless Boyle could have had no idea of the future consequences of his prefatory clause of sarcasm. ESTC T144295. Brunet IV 592.   Ref: 43129 
£475
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Philostratus, L. Flavius 'the Athenian'; Philostratus 'the Lemnian' & Philostratus 'the Younger'?; ['Apollonius of Tyana'; Eusebius of Caesarea; Callistratus:] (Olearius, G., ed.:) [Opera] quae supersunt omnia. Vita Apollonii libris VIII, Vitae Sophistorum libris II, Heroica, Imagines Priores atque Posteriores, et Epistolae. Accessere Apollonii Tyanensis epistolae, Eusebii liber adversus Hieroclem, Callistrati descript. statuarum [...] Lipsiae [Leipzig]: Apud Thomam Fritsch, 1709. First edition thus. Folio, pp. [viii], xliii, [i], 987, [i]. Half-title, title in red and black with printer's Pegasus device, woodcut initials and head- and tail-pieces, occasional small engravings in the text. A little faint foxing, a very small number of toned leaves (e.g. Q2). Contemporary dark brown calf, gilt spine with raised bands, dark red morocco title label, edges coloured red, marbled endpapers. Rubbed with faint crackling to surface, endcaps worn and endbands lost, joints creased and starting to crack at head and tail but boards holding firm, corners fraying. Still, a very good copy overall. Olearius's edition of the Philostrati, which uses unpublished notes by the scholar Richard Bentley. Works present include an account of the 1st century AD Pythagorean Apollonius of Tyana, of other pagan sophists, of the cults of heroes of the Trojan war, and letters on themes of love (Ben Jonson's 'To Celia' is derived from letter 33), and descriptions of artistic images. Also included are letters once attributed to Apollonius of Tyana; descriptions of statues by Callistratus (fl. 3rd or 4th century), an imitator of Philostratus; and the treatise of Eusebius of Caesarea (c.AD 260-339) against comparisons between Apollonius and Christ. Gottfried Olearius (1672-1715) was brought up and educated in Leipzig, where from 1709 he was professor of theology. He travelled in Holland and England in 1693.   Ref: 51001 
£500
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Plautus, Titus Maccius: (Gronovius, J.F., ed.:) Comoediae. Accedit commentarius [...] Lugd. Batavorum [Leiden]: Ex Officina Hackiana, 1664. First edition. 8vo., pp. [xvi] 1154 [lii]. Engraved title page, woodcut initials. Occasional spots of light foxing and browning but generally very clean. Contemporary vellum, title inked to spine, fore-edges turned in, edges sprinkled blue. Paper edge label with 'Plautus Gronovii & variorum' in an old hand tipped to tail edge of upper board. A few smudgy marks to boards, top edge a bit darkened, paper edge label crumpled and a little toned but an interesting addition to an already very good copy. Small oval paper label with MS '195' to spine; pale blue bookplate of Fintray House library, with E.195 added by hand. The first Gronovius edition of Plautus, with notes by him and others, and new readings from 6 MSS. Dibdin (4th edn.) II 312. Schweiger III 766. Graesse V 329.   Ref: 51893 
£225
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Plautus, Titus Maccius: (Taubmann, Friedrich, ed.:) Comoediae XX superstites, nunc denuo, post omnium Editiones, ad fidem meliorum [Colophon: Wittebergae [Wittenberg] apud Zachariam Schurerum [typis Johannis Gormanni] 1612. 4to., pp. [xl] 1320 [cxxiv]. Mostly Roman and Italic letter. Printer's device to title-page, repeated on final leaf recto (a colophon leaf with verso blank). Some nice woodcut headpieces. Sig. 3Q4 [pp. [1231-1232]] is blank save for woodcut device on recto. Browning, some spotting, a few leaves short in the bottom margin (blank), bound in contemporary vellum, overlapping along the long edge, soiled, ties removed. All edges red. Old MS shelfmark label to foot of spine (shelfmark repeated in pencil on front pastedown), a very small and unobtrusive old armorial ownership or library stamp to title-page. Second and best edition by Friedrich Taubmann of Wittenberg (1565-1613). Celebrated most for its clear and complete commentaries, the product of nearly 20 years' work (Schweiger), the book is also of interest for the contemporary world it shows up: there are letters to Taubmann by the celebrated figures Justus Lipsius, Daniel Heinsius, Isaac Casaubon, and Joseph Scaliger, and the prefatory poems include a short work, by a Bohemian called Christopher Cinesius, in Syriac and Greek! Taubmann made use of collations provided by Jan Gruter (1560-1627), the last librarian of the Palatine library in Heidelberg, whose priceless manuscripts were removed to the Vatican in 1623, after the defeat of the elector Frederick of Bohemia. Gruter produced his own edition of Plautus based on Taubmann's work in 1621. Dibdin (4th edn.) II 311. Schweiger III 764. VD 17 1:043513Q.   Ref: 21248  show full image..
£450
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Polignac, Melchior de: Anti-Lucretius, sive de Deo et Natura, libri novem. Parisiis [Paris]: Apud Hippolytum-Ludovicum Guerin, & Jacobum Guerin 1747. 2 vols., 8vo., pp. [ii] xxx [ii] 180; [iv] 181-450 + frontispiece. Without half-title in first volume. Some light browning and spotting. Contemporary calf, neatly rebacked with old green morocco gilt labels preserved, corners and hinges renewed, old leather scratched and slightly worn around the sides. A posthumously published poem in the Lucretian style offering a Christian and Cartesian refutation of Lucretius and Epicurean philosophy. Cardinal Polignac's (1661-1742) philosophy is "questionable, but the poem is, in form, the best imitation of Lucretius and Virgil extant" (Catholic Encyclopedia). Brunet IV 777.   Ref: 25031 
£200
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Pollux, Julius: (Lederlin, J.H.; Hemsterhuys, T.): Onomasticon Graece & Latine. Amstelaedami [Amsterdam], Ex Officina Wetsteniana 1706. 2 vols., folio, pp. [viii] 683 [i]; [ii] 687-1388 178 [x] + 1 folding plate. Half-title to each volume, to vol. I. an engraved title and engraved frontispiece with Amsterdam coat of arms, vol.I title page in red and black, woodcut initials, parallel Greek and Latin texts. Fold-out plate of coins before p.1027 in vol. II. The first page of text in each volume has a portion of its fore-edge margin excised, seemingly to remove ms. Occasional faint staining to fore-edge margins, a few wax spots, upper half of r.f.e.p. excised. Contemporary blind-tooled vellum, titles inked to spines, edges sprinkled red. Spines a little darkened, slightly grubby with a few small stains but a very good set. To the front of each volume a partially erased ownership inscription dated 1837. An interesting and important edition of the 2nd-century AD Greek thesaurus of Iulius Pollux, which had been begun and abandoned by Jean-Henri Lederlin (1672-1737). His replacement as editor, Tiberius Hemsterhuys (1685-1766), professor at Amsterdam, has "the honour of reviving the study of Greek in the Netherlands" (Sandys). For this edition he wrote for advice to Richard Bentley, the expert on Greek metre, but received his suggestions after the book went to press. Bentley later sent a long letter giving corrections to the texts of the fragments of comedy as found here in book 10. "So deep was [Hemsterhuys's] distress that he determined to abandon Greek for ever, and for two months did not dare to open a Greek book" (ibid.) Pollux is a source of information on many subjects, including theatre, the Athenian constitution, and the thirty-three terms of abuse for a tax-collector. The text survived only in interpolated copies of an early interpolated epitome. Schweiger I 270: "Gute Ausg." Sandys II 449; Hoffmann III, 262.   Ref: 50152 
£750
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Pollux, Julius: (Lederlinus, J.H., and T. Hemsterhuis, comm.:) Onomasticum Graece & Latine. Post egregiam illam Wolfgangi Seberi editionem denuo immane quantum emendatum, suppletum, & illustratum, ut docebunt praefationes ; praeter W. Seberi notas olim editas ; accedit commentarius doctissimus Gothofredi Jungermanni, nunc tandem a tenebris Amstelaedami: ex Officina Wetsteniana, 1706. 2 vols. Folio, pp. [viii], 48, 683, [i]; [ii], 687-1388, [xvi], 178, [x] + folding plate to vol. II. Addtional engraved title page and frontispiece, title page in red and black, woodcut initials. Very occasional light foxing and patchy toning, a few tiny wax spots but generally clean within. Slightly later lightly speckled brown calf, ornate gilt spines with terracotta-coloured morocco labels, edges sprinkled red. Joints cracking but cords holding firm, endcaps worn with some loss, a bit rubbed, corners bumped, a little creasing to endpapers. A good, attractive set. Wellington College Boys' Library bookplate to each front paste-down. The Onomasticon, a 2nd century AD thesaurus of Attic Greek phrases which preserves much significant material, as edited primarily by J. H. Lederlin - with the last three books taken care of by Hemsterhuis. The edition impressed Bentley, who sent Hemsterhuis an admiring letter, including some conjectures of his own on the text (and it is said that the brilliance of these conjectures nearly put the Dutch scholar off any future attempts at Greek).   Ref: 51003  show full image..
£450
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Pomponius Mela: (Gronovius, Abraham, ed,:) De Situ Orbis Libri III. Cum notis integris Hermolai Barbari, Petri Joannis Olivarii, Fredenandi Nonii Pintiani, Petri Ciacconii, Andreae Schotti, Isaaci Vossii, et Jacobi Gronovii. Accedunt Petri Joannis Nunnesii epistola de patria Pomponii Melae, & adnotata in prooemium, a Lugduni Batavorum [Leiden]: apud Samuelem Luchtmans et Fil, Academiae Typographos, 1748. 8vo., pp. [xx], 1081, [lv] + additional engraved title-page and 1 folding map. Title-page in red and black, woodcut initials, illustrations in the text. A few very faint smudges to title-page but clean and bright overall. Slightly later brown marbled calf, very neatly rebacked flat spine with raised bands, gilt, and green straight-grain morocco title label; gilt border and armorial centrepiece to both boards, edges coloured red, marbled endpapers. Small tear to head-cap, a few very light scuffs, corners beginning to wear a little, very good indeed. Dibdin lists 1722 and 1742 editions; COPAC finds no copies dated 1742, but several dated 1748 as here. He describes the latter as the better edition. Also contains illustrative works by Nunnes, Perizonius, Isaac Vossius and I. and A. Gronovius. Abraham Gronovius (1695-1775) was the grandson of J.F. Gronovius, son of Jakob, and librarian at Leiden University. He is perhaps best known for his work on Justinus. This edition incorporates the work of his father, who had himself published two editions of the text. Dibdin II (4th edn.) 356   Ref: 51704 
£350
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Propertius, Sextus Aurelius: [Broekhuizen, Joan van, ed.:] Elegiarum, libri quatuor : ad fidem veterum membranarum sedulo castigati. Accedunt notae, & terni indices; quorum primus omnes voces Propertianas complectitur. Amstelaedami [Amsterdam]: Henricum Wetstenium & Rod. & Gerh. Wetstenios, 1702. Small 4to. (240 x 180mm), pp. [xxviii], 423, [ci]. Title page in red and black with engraved vignette. Library inkstamps to title-page and preliminary blanks, small closed tear to fore-edge margin p.61 not affecting text, top of head margins a little toned. Contemporary vellum, gilt tan calf label to spine, edges faintly sprinkled red. Smudged and a little darkened in places, front joint and corners a bit worn, paste-downs loosening, some loss to head of f.f.e.p. (apparently to remove an inscription), edges dusty. Metropolitan Special Collections Southwark library inkstamps, plus remains of library label to front paste-down. Leaf of Latin notes in an old hand loosely inserted to rear. Described by Dibdin as a 'very valuable' edition. The first major work of Joan van Broekhuizen (1649-1707), initially an army-man, where he became friends with Graevius (who reportedly arranged for his pardon for duelling, through Nicholas Heinsius). After retiring from the army he turned to scholarship, also producing an edition of Tibullus and composing poetry in Latin. Dibdin (4th edn.) I 384; Brunet IV 904   Ref: 46433 
£200
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Propertius, Sextus: (Volpi, J.A.; Passerat, J. & Broukhusius, J.:) [Opera] Patavii [Padua]: excudebat Josephus Cominus, 1755. 2 vols., 4to., pp. [x], LXVIII, 156, 560; [ii], 563-1290, [vi]. Lacking initial blank to vol.I. (as seems usual based copies previously held). Vol. I title-page in red and black with engraved vignette, woodcut initials, head- and tail-pieces; vol. II with half-title only, as called for. Vol. ii with errata and colophon to final leaves. A few neat pencil annotations, some pencilled booksellers' notes and codes to preliminary blanks. Small wormhole to centre of first 3 leaves of vol.I, touching a few letters. Light foxing to start of vol.I up to about p.XV and to first 2 leaves of vol.II, otherwise a clean and bright copy overall. Early 19th-century brown calf, rebacked with original spines retained. Spines heavily gilt with flat raised bands, directly lettered with author and editor's names and volume numbers, ornate gilt and blind-toooled borders, a.e.g., marbled endpapers. Laid-down original spines a little crackled, corners worn, a few scuff marks mostly to vol.II, endpapers discreetly repaired at hinges. A very good, hansdome set. To the front paste-down of each volume: small green straight-grain morocco book label with gilt borders, crest of a cockerel and the initials B.C.B.; early 20th-century armorial bookplate of George Charlewood Turner (1891-1967). Turner was a schoolmaster, headmaster and university principal. He began his career at Marlborough, then in 1939 moved to Kampala, Uganda to become principal of Makerere University College. On his return to England in 1947 he was appointed headmaster of Charterhouse School where 'after wartime difficulties, his mild but firm regime gave needed time for recovery' (ODNB). To the first blank leaf of vol.I, the pencilled ownership inscription of H.H. Vaughan, together with some notes on the purchase of these volumes, initialled by him. We believe this to be the inscription of the historian and university reformer Henry Halford Vaughan (18111885). An influential figure at Oxford University, Vaughan was renowned for his dazzling lectures but published little. First Volpi edition of the poems of Propertius (fl. first century B.C.), often on the subject of love and the author's devotion to his mistress, Cynthia. 'His vivid recreation of his affair with Cynthia, his literary range and his political independence make Propertius one of the most captivating of the Latin poets' (OCD). Volpi (1686-1766) was professor of philosophy at Padua from 1727, and professor of eloquence from 1736. This book is from his own highly successful publishing house, which he set up in 1717, and entrusted to Giuseppe Comino (Josephus Cominus). 'Les livres [...] ne tardèrent pas à lui assurer une réputation bien meritée par la correction du texte, par l'elégance des caractères et par les annotations critiques qui les accompagnent. Les éditions des classiques anciens et modernes enrichies de commentaires et de notes savantes, dues à la plume de Volpi et généralement recherchées des érudits, sont le principal titre de sa gloire' (NBG). Dibdin writes of this edition that, 'The celebrity acquired by Vulpius in his editions of Catullus and Tibullus is far from being diminished by this excellent and critical edition of Propertius [...]' Dibdin I (4th edn.) 385; Schweiger III 831   Ref: 51891 
£400
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