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[Sallust] Sallustius Crispus, Gaius; Florus, Lucius Annaeus; Velleius Paterculus, Gaius: (Crispinus, Daniel, Anne Le Fevre & Robert Riguez, eds.:) [Opera] Quae extant. In usum serenissimi Galliarum Delphini, diligenter recensuit, & Notulas addidit Daniel Crispinus. [Bound with:] Rerum Romanarum Epitome. Interpretatione et notis illustravit Anna Tanaquilli Fabri filia. [And:] Historiae Romanae ad M. Vinicium Cos. li Parisiis [Paris]: Apud Fredericum Leonard, 1674; 1674; 1675. 4to., pp. [xxx], 234, [cxxvi], [xxii], 205, [clix], [xxviii], 151, [lxxxix] + an engraved frontispiece to each work. Age-toned throughout, some light foxing and spotting, blank lower margin of second title-page renewed early on. 18th-century vellum boards, spine in 5 compartments with raised bands, red morocco label in second compartment, old paper shelfmark label to foot, long sides overlapping. Booklabel with motto 'sollicitae iucunda oblivia vitae' to front pastedown, and an early ownership inscription to the foot of each title-page 'Laurentii Paralos'(?). The Delphin editions, produced as part of a project to newly edit and annotate all of classical literature to aid the education of the French Dauphin, of Sallust, Lucius Annaeus Florus, and Velleius Paterculus, all bound together. The Sallust is edited by Daniel Crespin, one of the primary editors of the series, the Florus by the notable scholar Anne Dacier (nee Le Fevre), and the Velleius Paterculus by the Jesuit Robert Riguez.   Ref: 40548 
£400
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Salvian of Marseilles: A treatise of God's government and of the justice of his present dispensations in this world. London: printed for S. Keble, 1700. 8vo., pp. [xxiv], 255, [i]. Some headlines cropped. Browned and foxed in places, some staining, early clumsy inscription to head of title page, later advisory manuscript verse to initial blank. Later quarter calf with marbled boards, corners tipped with vellum, spine renewed preserving old label, endpapers renewed at various times. The first full translation into English of the greatest work of the 5th-century Christian writer Salvian of Marseilles, a treatise arguing that God maintained continuous close governance of the world; therefore, it concludes, the barbarian invasions of Rome were punishment for the immoral and dissolute inhabitants of the city. ESTC R16712.   Ref: 40117 
£300
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[Sanchuniathon] Cumberland, R.: (Payne, S., pref.:) Sanchoniatho's Phoenician History, Translated from the First Book of Eusebius, De Praeparatione Evangelica. With a Continuation of Sanchoniatho's History of Eratosthenes Cyrenaeus's Canon, which Dicaerchus Connects with the First Olympiad [...] London: printed by W[illiam]. B[owyer]. for R. Wilkin, 1720. First edition thus. 8vo., pp. xxxii, xvii-xxii (i.e. xxxiii-xxxviii misnumbered), [ii], 488 + folding chart. Woodcut head- and tail-pieces, and initials. Sporadic light toning, edges of ffep and title-page toned, folding chart protruding very slightly at fore-edge and with a short closed tear along the central fold. Contemporary Cambridge-style panelled calf, recently rebacked, raised bands, red morocco gilt spine label, edges sprinkled red. A little rubbed, a tiny hole and a scrape to surface of upper board, corners fraying. A very good, sound copy. Small oval bookplate lettered AF to front paste-down. Illegible ownership inscription to head of title page. The preface (sig. A-C), reimposed in half sheets, was separately issued; here its final gathering C is mislabelled E. Cumberland (1632–1718) had already published several well-respected works by the time he produced the manuscript for Sanchoniatho's Phoenician History. It was 'the first English translation of this controversial fragment of Phoenician ancient history, which is recorded in the work of Eusebius; it appeared together with a detailed commentary that sought to reconcile Sanchoniatho's history with the Bible. Sanchoniatho's account revealed the means by which the Phoenicians had corrupted sacred history to deify their own versions of biblical individuals. Cumberland traced the resulting polytheism and idolatry to its most recent manifestation in the Roman Catholic church. On the eve of the revolution of 1688 Cumberland's publisher thought the work too controversial to publish.' (ODNB) It was eventually published posthumously in 1720, prefaced with a biographical memoir by Cumberland's son-in-law and domestic chaplain, Squire Payne. On the subject of Sanchiniathon's disputed authenticity, he writes 'The Humour which prevail'd with several learned Men to reject Sanchuniatho as a counterfeit because they knew not what to make of him, his Lordship always blam'd Philo Byblius, Porphyry and Eusebius, who were better able to judge than any Moderns, never call in question his being genuine.' The modern view is that Philo's summary of Sanchuniathon offers a Hellenistic view of Phoenician materials, or is otherwise a literary invention of Philo. ESTC T100370; Maslen and Lancaster, Bowyer Ledgers, 695   Ref: 51769 
£175
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[Saumaise, Claude]; Milton, (John); [Rowland, John]; Phillips, (John); [Du Moulin the Younger, Pierre]; Milton, (John): 1) Defensio regia pro Carolo I [...]; 2) [...] Angli pro Populo Anglicano Defensio Contra Claudii Anonymi, alias Salmasii, Defensionem Regiam; 3) Pro Rege et Populo Anglicano Apologia, Contra Iohannis Polypragmatici, (alias Miltoni Angli) Defensionem Dest 1) Sumptibus regiis; 2) Londini [i.e. Utrecht]: Typis Du-Gardianis; 3) Antwerpiae [Antwerp]: Hierony 1652; 1651; 1652; 1652; 1652; 1654. 6 works bound as 1. 12mo., pp. 444; [xx], 244; [xvi], 175, [i]; 112; [xvi], 148; [xvi], 128. Woodcut devices to title-pages (including arms to the 2nd and 4th works), initials and head-pieces. Occasional very faint dampstaining to a few leaves; Phillips p.71 too lightly printed but only the last line illegible, and bottom margins unevenly cut. Contemporary vellum, title faintly inked to spine but largely illegible, fore-edges turned in. Spine damaged with three vertical splits, an area of loss approx. 5 x 1.5cm and some chips to endcaps, vellum a little grubby. An internally clean copy, soundly bound despite the defective spine. Purple inkstamp of Brandenburgische Landeshochschule (part of the University of Potsdam) applied as follows: Saumaise, title-page verso; Milton, p.241; Du Moulin p.53. Also to Saumaise, title-page verso, a second, fainter inkstamp. To ffep, a tiny and sadly illegible inscription dated 1664. Saumaise was a French protestant scholar, internationally famous during his lifetime and now perhaps best remembered for the first work in this collection, Defensio regia pro Carolo I. One of the first published defences of Charles I, it appeared anonymously (though the identity of its author was widely known) in 1649, with a French translation also by Saumaise following soon after the inital publication. Charles II helped to cover printing costs, and donated a further £100 to the author. The Council of State considered the work highly damaging to trade relations with continental Europe and commissioned Milton to write a reply. That reply is the second work we find here, now commonly known as Defensio Prima. The second Earl of Bridgewater notes in his copy, now in the Huntington Library, that (in Latin) 'this book is most deserving of burning, its author of the gallows'. 'This judgement, which was typical of English royalist reactions, was echoed in the chancellaries of Europe, and it was to the educated citizens of Europe (especially those of the United Provinces) that Milton addressed his defence of the regicide.' (ODNB). Defensio Prima was ordered to be printed on 23rd December 1650, and ran to more than a dozen editions in its first two years. The third work in this collection, Rowland's Pro rege et populo Anglicano apologia was the first published response to Milton's tract, its title calling him 'John the Multifarious, alias Milton the Englishman''. This tract was published anonymously in Antwerp and was initally erroneously attributed to John Bramhall. Poorly written in clumsy Latin, Milton did not respond to it himself but left the task to his nephew John Phillips (though he is now believed to have revised Phillips' and corrected his Latin). Phillips' response is the fourth work included here. Things escalated in August of 1652 when Regii Sanguinis Clamor ad Coelum [...], the fifth work found here, was anonymously published. 'The Clamor contains a brutal personal attack on Milton in its opening pages, and concludes with a 245-line poem that renews the attack. The author of this work was almost certainly the Anglican divine Peter Du Moulin, who sent it to Salmasius in order that it could be published in the Netherlands; Salmasius passed the manuscript to Alexander More, a minister of the Reformed church. More (Latin Morus) contributed a preface to Du Moulin's treatise, and sent it to Adriaan Vlacq, who published it in The Hague. Milton mistakenly assumed that More was the author of the treatise, and although he was apprised of his error by John Durie and Samuel Hartlib, he stood by his mistake and flatly refused to be dissuaded.'(ODNB) Milton reponded to The Clamor in May of 1654, still believing More to be his attacker, with Defensio Secunda the sixth and final book of this collection, Milton presents a picture of his own early life as a paragon of virtue while making a deeply personal attack on More for supposed sexual indescretions and immorality. This collection ends there, but the row continued through three more works published after its compiler presumably gave up: More defended himself in October 1654 with Alexandri Mori ecclesiasticae et sacrarum litterarum professoris fides publica, contra calumnias Ioannis Miltoni and added a further Supplement early the following year; in August of the same year Milton published his third and final response, Joannis Miltonii Angli pro se defensio contra Alexander Morum, ecclesiasten, libelli famosi, cui titulus, 'Regii sanguinis clamor' […] authorem recte dictum, still doggedly and wrongly attributing The Clamor to More.   Ref: 51397 
£600
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(Saywell, William:) The Reformation Of the Church of England. Justified, according to the canons of the Council of Nice and other general councils, and the tradition of the Catholick Church. Being an answer to a paper reprinted at Oxford, called [the Schisme of the Church of England] demonstrated in four argume Cambridge: printed by John Hayes, Printer to the University: For Edward Hall bookseller there. And a 1688. Pamphlet, 4to., pp. [vi], 33, [i]. Woodcut initials and head-piece, advertisement dated June 22 1688 printed on the final leaf verso. A few light spots and smudges, title page a little dusty. Disbound, some leather fragments remaining at spine. To the title-page: a code and '7' inked in an old hand; the anonymous author's name faintly pencilled in. The Reformation Of the Church of England [...] was Saywell's anonymously-published response to 'the Catholic threat under James II in general and to the republication of what he claimed was a distorted account of a debate in the 1650s held between two Catholic priests and Peter Gunning and John Pearson in particular'. (ODNB) ESTC R23179; Wing S803   Ref: 51415 
£50
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[Scriptores Rei Rusticae] Cato, Marcus Porcius; Varro, Marcus Terentius; Columella, Lucius Junius Moderatus et al. (Gesner, Johann Matthias, ed.;) (Ernesti, Johann August, rev.:) Scriptores Rei Rusticae Veretes Latini [...] Lipsiae (Leipzig): sumptibus Caspari Fritsch, 1773; 1774. Second edition. 2 vols. 4to., pp. [vii], lviii, 936; [iv], 448, 163, [i] + frontispiece to vol. I and 6 further folding plates. Engraved vignette to each title-page. Some spotting and browning due to paper quality as usual with Fritsch (but less than sometimes seen), final plate a little oversized and therefore crumpled at edges. Contemporary speckled tan calf, red and green morocco gilt spine labels, edges sprinkled red. Vol. I head-cap a little chipped, a few small stains and patchy fading but overall a very good set. Armorial bookplate of the Right Hon. Henry Hobhouse (1854-1937), Liberal MP for East Somerset and father of the peace activist and prison reformer Stephen Hobhouse (1881-1961) and Arthur Hobhouse (1886-1965), architect of the National Park system of England and Wales. A collection of classical works on agriculture and natural history thought to have been assembled in the Middle Ages, and certainly printed at least 5 times before 1501. This production sees Ernesti revise Gesner's 1735 edition. Schweiger II, 1307   Ref: 50153 
£350
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Secundus, Johannes: (Scriverius, P., ed.:) Opera. Accurate recognita ex museo. Lugduni Batavorum [Leiden]: Apud Franciscum Hegerum, 1631. 12mo., pp. [xxviii], 384, [ii], incl. engraved title and one other full-page engraving. Very occasional light spotting but clean overall. Contemporary vellum, title inked to spine, edges turned in. A little grubby, spine darkened and very slightly twisted but completely sound. A very good copy. Initials R.G. in an old hand to ffep. Armorial bookplate of James Walker of Sand Hutton, with the motto 'Honesta Quam Magna', to front paste-down. The Walker baronetcy was created for James Walker (1803–1883) in 1868. The Dutch neo-Latin poet Johannes Secundus is best known for his 'Basia', poems about kissing.   Ref: 51824 
£150
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Seneca (the Younger): Publilius Syrus: (Haverkamp, Syvert & Preiger, Abraham, eds.:) [...] Singulares Sententiae centum aliquot versibus ex codd. Pall. & Frising. auctae & correctae, studio & opera Jani Gruteri. cum notis ejusdem recognitis & castigatis. accedunt ejusdem notae postumae ut & nova versio Graeca Josephi Scaligeri [...] nunc primum ex utriusque aut Lugduni Batavorum [Leiden]: apud Johannem du Vivie, 1708. 8vo., pp. [xxviii], 569, [v]. Additional engraved title-page, title-page in red and black with engraved vignette, woodcut head- and tail-pieces. Sporadic light foxing, evidence in gutter preceeding engraved title of presentation certificate removal. Contemporary vellum prize binding, gilt spine with red morocco label, gilt crest of The Hague to each board, edges sprinkled red. Spine label a little chipped, some greyish marks, boards slightly bowed, top edge dusty. Bookplate of Maurice B. Worms to front paste-down, possibly Maurice Benedict de Worms (1805-67), an Austrian plantation owner descended from the Rothschild family. Modern ink inscription to f.f.e.p., 'A.S.B. from A.J.C. Easter mcmlx'. Taken from works including De Moribus, these writings are now attributed to 'Pseudo-Seneca'. Containing 'some notes of Scaliger and Gruter... The engraved frontispiece, representing the subjects of the several plays, is very spiritedly executed.' (Dibdin). Dibdin II, 398   Ref: 48985 
£200
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Seneca, Lucius Annaeus: (Schröder, Joannes Caspar, ed.:) Tragoediae [...] cum notis integris Johannis Frederici Gronovii, et selectis Justi Lipsiii, M. Antonii Delrii, Jani Gruteri, H. Commelini, Josephi Scaligeri, Danielis et Nicolai Heinsiorum, Thomae Farnabii aliorumque; itemque Observationibus nonnullis Hugonis Grotii. Delphis [Delft]: apud Adrianum Beman, 1728. First edition thus. 2 vols in one., 4to, pp. [cxx], 464, [ii], 465-802 [ccxii] + additional engraved title-page. Title-page in red and black, woodcut intials, a few illustrations in the text. Title-page a little toned with further occasional light toning. Recently rebound in half tan calf, a little blind tooling, red gilt title label to spine, marbled boards and endpapers, a.e.g.. Spine a little faded and with a few scratches, otherwise very good indeed. Standard edition of Seneca's tragedies, with also the prefatory discussions from the previous editions, an essay on Seneca's metre, and the fullest glossary to date. The plays of the great Stoic philosopher Seneca (4 BCE - 65 CE) take their themes from Greek tragedies, but also draw particularly on Ovid. They reflect the very particular Stoic theories of psychology, ethics and physics. "A very elaborate and celebrated edition; [...] It is accompanied with a new and excellent index, by Grimsehlius, of almost all the words and phrases of Seneca" (Dibdin); it is also on Dibdin's list of the best quarto variorum editions. Dibdin (4th edn.) II 399, and listed as "best variorum quarto" of Seneca in his qualitative index in the 3rd edn; Schweiger III 941.   Ref: 51783 
£200
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Silius Italicus: De Secundo Bello Punico. Amsterodami [Amsterdam]: Apud Guiljel. Janssonium, 1620. 16mo. in 8's, pp. 279, [i]. Title-page with engraved historiated border. Occasional light stains and smudges. Later parchment over thin boards, black and gilt label to spine, edges sprinkled red. A bit grubby, tiny nick to parchment at head edge, very good. Armorial bookplate of John Peter Fearon (c.1804-73) to front pastedown. 'John Peter Fearon was a distinguished parliamentary lawyer and acted for the major railway companies at that time. He also acted for the Meuse and Sambre railway in Belgium. He was also a Solicitor to the Attorney General in Charity Affairs. He was, among many other matters, also responsible for the drafting of new Charters for New College, Oxford and St Cross, Winchester.' (fearonlaw dot com) Pocket-sized copy of Silius Italicus's (c.28 – c.103) only surviving work, the 17-book Punica, an epic poem about the Second Punic War. Schweiger 955   Ref: 51724 
£125
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