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Statius, Publius Papinius: (Stephens, Thomas, trans.:) An Essay Upon Statius: or, the Five First Books of Publ. Papinius Statius his Thebais. Done Into English Verse by T.S. With the Poetick History Illustrated. London: printed for Richard Royston, 1648. First edition. 8vo., pp.[xiv], 152 including portrait frontispiece. Bound without preliminary blanks. Woodcut headpieces. Small burn hole to leaf C4 affecting a couple of lettters, a few small spots and smudges. 19th-century tan polished calf, neatly rebacked with original spine retained, two black morocco and gilt labels to spine, edges sprinkled grey, some pencilled bibliographical notes to endpapers, A few scrapes to lower board, corners a little worn, but still very good. Bookplate of Christopher Rowe to front paste-down. From the library of Thomas Park (1758/91834), antiquary and bibliographer, with his signature to the title-page but sadly without the heavy annotation for which he was known. The first translation of Statius into English. Stephens (d.1677), headmaster of the grammar school at Bury St Edmunds, claims in the prefatory material that the translation is purely for use by his students. Indeed, it does serve to as introduction to Statius' poetry during a time 'increasingly hostile to his aesthetics as well as to his politics'. However, this claim is shown to be a little disingenuous, as Stephens' Royalist sympathies are quite apparent in his translation. He 'seems to have seen in Statius' Thebaid a poem for his times that, translated, could provide an oblique commentary on English politics and the crisis of monarchy.' (Brill's Companion to Statius, p.603) This work appears at a fraught point in the career of its publisher Richard Royston, 'staunch supporter of the church and the crown'. Imprisoned in the Fleet from July to October of 1645 for issuing an anti-parliament parody of Robert Ram's Soldier's Catechism, by 1648 he was embroiled in the controversial publication of Eikon Basilike, allegedly written by Charles I during his incarceration. 'Royston's involvement with the publication had begun earlier and by the end of 1648 he contrived to get Eikon into print, using a series of printers, and began distributing it. Although it has been suggested that he was imprisoned for publishing the King's Book, there is no evidence of this. However, in October 1649, nine months after the execution of Charles I, Royston was called before the council of state and was bound in £500 to appear 'when required, and not to print or sell any unlicensed books or pamphlets in the meantime' (CSP dom., 164950, 524).' (ODNB) ESTC R21944; Wing S5335   Ref: 51516  show full image..
£1000
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Stillingfleet, Benjamin (trans.:) Miscellaneous Tracts relating to Natural History, Husbandry, and Physick. To which is added the Calendar of Flora. London, Printed and sold by R. and J. Dodsley. 1762. 8vo., pp. xxxi [i] 391 [i] + 11 plates. Light toning, a little spotting, one gathering slightly proud, a couple of marginal pencil notes. Slightly later tan calf, rebacked preserving original spine and endpapers, spine in six compartments with raised bands, new red morocco label, gilt decoration (now darkened and chipped), old scratches to boards since polished. Ownership inscription of J. Cooke Garborough to upper pastedown. A collection of papers translated by Stillingfleet from the 'Amoenitates Academicae', including Linnaeus on 'the necessity of travelling in one's own country', J.G. Bayerstein on the improvement of physick, Barck on foliation, Gedner on curiosity, and Stillingfleet's own observations on grasses (with illustrative plates). The 'Calendar of Flora' is partly extracted from Theophrastus. ESTC T81085.   Ref: 28114 
£350
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Strada, Famiano: Prolusiones Academicæ. Oxonii [Oxford]: Sheldonian Theatre, 1745. 8vo., pp.[xii], 325, [xxi]. Engraved publisher's vignette to title page, wide margins. A little browning to pp.50-1, pencilled note to p.216, occasional light foxing. Contemporary vellum, marbled edges and endpapers. Spine darkened and ink title largely rubbed away, boards somewhat marked, corners bumped. These lectures by the Jesuit historian Famiano Strada (1572-1649) were first published in Cologne 1617 and had a long life in print in Oxford, appearing in 1631 as well as in this mid-eighteenth-century printing. Strada's writings are remarkable for how substantially forgotten they are, despite the substantial influence that one or two individual lines have had: The contest of the Musician and the Nightingale, adapted by Ford and Crawshaw, among other European poets, is included, as is a passage proposing the idea of communicating at a distance by magnetized needles - perhaps the first proposal of the theory behind the telegraph. Strada's writings may have also (in Coleridge's opinion) influenced Milton's choice of subject in Paradise Lost. ESTC T100350   Ref: 46583 
£250
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Stukeley, William: An Account of Richard of Cirencester, Monk of Westminster, and of his Works: with his Antient Map of Roman Brittain; and the Itinerary thereof. Read at the Antiquarian Society, March 18, 1756. London: printed by Richard Hett: and sold by Charles Corbet, 1757. First edition. 4to, pp. 94, [ii] + folding map, + blank leaf to front and rear. A few woodcut initials and decorations, facsimile of part of an original MS to final leaf. Blank leaves foxed and a little tattered at edges, first and final few leaves toned at edges (seemingly acid transfer from a previous leather binding); map a little creased at head and tail edges, with 75mm closed tear along one fold and short closed tears at each end of gutter attachment. Recently rebound in dark green library buckram backed with dark green textured sheep, gilt title to spine, new endpapers with cloth-reinforced hinges. A very good copy in an incongruent but very practical binding. Library code in red ink to title-page. To title-page verso, armorial bookplate of 'A. Gifford, D.D. of the Museum'. Baptist minister Andrew Gifford (1700-1784) was assistant librarian at the British Museum from 1757 to 1784. He left many of his books, and other objects, to the Baptist College in Bristol. 'In 1747 Stukeley received a letter from a young Englishman named Charles Bertram, resident in Copenhagen, informing him of his discovery of a medieval copy of a previously unknown Roman map and itinerary of Britain, allegedly made by a fourteenth-century monk of Westminster. Stuart Piggott has described this episode as 'one of the most audacious and successful literary forgeries of the eighteenth century' (Piggott, William Stukeley: an Eighteenth-Century Antiquary, 127). Although Stukeley attempted to purchase the (non-existent) manuscript of De situ Britanniae for the newly opened British Museum, the amicable correspondence between him and Bertram did lead to the publication of Stukeley's An Account of Richard of Cirencester, Monk of Westminster, and of his Works (1757) and Bertram's Britannicarum gentium historiae antiquae scriptores tres (1757, including authentic works by Gildas and Nennius). Bertram's forgery as disseminated in these two books was a great success, and De situ was considered an authentic source for Roman Britain (it was even used in part by Edward Gibbon). The forgery was not fully discredited until 1869.' (ODNB) ESTC T68353   Ref: 51077 
£550
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Symmachus, Quintus Aurelius; St. Ambrose: Epistolarum Libri Decem. Lugd. Batavorum [Leiden]: imprimi fecit Gerhard Wingendorp, 1653. 12mo., pp. [x], 19-461, [iii] + engraved title-page featuring a portrait of the author. Several leaves unopened. Early 18th-century mottled calf, spine gilt, marbled edges. Joints a little worn, some scratches but very good. A pocket edition of Symmachus's letters, first printed in 1510 (partially; later editions tripled the number of included letters). Schweiger II, 991; Graesse V, 539; Willems 1678.   Ref: 46581 
£300
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[Terence] Terentius Afer, Publius: Comoediae. Birminghamiae [Birmingham]: Johannis Baskerville, 1772. First Baskerville edition. Large 4to, pp. [ii], 364. Pp.203,299 misnumbered 303, 283 respectively, as usual. Title-page recto and final leaf verso lightly toned, occasional light foxing, a few faint smudgy marks. Late 19th- or perhaps early 20th-century brown polished and sprinkled sheep, gilt spine with raised bands and burgundy morocco title label, plain double-fillet borders, a.e.g, marbled endpapers. Edges and raised bands a bit rubbed, some wear to joints and corners but still a very good, handsome copy. Tiny bookbinder's stamp reading 'Bound by Birdsall. Northampton & London' (1792-1961) to tail edge of ffep verso. A few small bookseller's notes pencilled to front endpapers. First Baskerville edition of Terence's Comedies; they were printed on the press' better 'Writing Royal' paper and sold for a Guinea each (a 12mo. was produced in the same year on cheaper paper). Terence (d. 159 B.C.) was born into slavery at Carthage and brought to Rome, where he was freed, taking his old master's name. His six comedies, which stand out for their particular naturalistic style, were admired right through the Middle Ages for their moral arguments, and were still on school curricula in the nineteenth century. Gaskell, 'Baskerville', * 46 (p. 58). ESTC T137489. Dibdin (4th edn.) II 477. Schweiger III 1070. Graesse VI.2 61. Brunet V 718.   Ref: 51890 
£250
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[Terence] Terentius Afer, Publius: (Heinsius, Daniel, ed.:) Comoediae Sex. Amstelaedami [Amsterdam]: apud Henr. Wetstenium, n.d. (c.1700) 16mo., pp.236, including engraved title-page. Bound without final blank in modern quarter red morocco, gilt title to spine. Spine worn at head and tail, rubbed but good overall. An interesting and apparently home-made binding. The leather used for the spine seems to have been repurposed, as a neat line of sewing-holes is visible to the rear. The boards themselves have been covered with a scrap of rather exuberant pink flocked wallpaper.   Ref: 51220 
£95
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[Terence] Terentius Afer, Publius: (Leng, John, ed.:) Comoediae ad optimorum Exemplarium fidem recensitae. Cantabrigiae [Cambridge]: Typis Academicis, impensis Jacobi Tonson, 1701. 4to., pp. [iv], 520 + engraved frontispiece. Some light spotting and toning, bookplate removed from title verso with corresponding dampmark visible on recto, blank corner of one leaf torn. Modern quarter calf with marbled boards, spine lettered in gilt. The new Cambridge University Press experienced some teething troubles in the production of its initiating series of quarto classics, and after the Horace of 1699 no further works appeared until several years later. This edition of Terence, in the established magisterial style and with a text edited by John Leng (1665-1727), later Bishop of Norwich, had gone to press beginning in June 1699 but received the date 1701 on the title and was actually provided to subscribers the following summer. ESTC T137034.   Ref: 42598 
£275
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[Terence] Terentius Afer, Publius: (Phaedrus; Publilius Syrus:) (Bentley, Richard, ed.:) Comoediae. Recensuit, notasque suas et Gabrielis Faerni addidit Richardus Bentleius. Editio altera; Augusti Liberti Fabularum Aesopiarum; Sententiae. Amstelaedami [Amsterdam]: Apud R. & J. Wetstenios, & G. Smith, 1727. 2 vols in 1. 4to., pp. [xxxii], 444, [clxxxii], [viii], 87, [xcvii] + engraved frontispiece and engraved portraits of the works' dedicatees, Princes Frederick Louis and William Augustus of England (the latter is depicted in an oval carried by an eagle above Aesop in a pastoral landscape). Includes half-title, title page in red and black with engraved vignette and divisional half title preceeding Phaedrus. Slightly toned, a few individual pages more affected. Contemporary prize vellum, orange morocco gilt label to spine, gilt border and coat of arms of Dordrecht to each board, edges sprinkled red and blue. Spine a little darkened, a few smudgy marks, ties lost but still very good. Retains its original printed presentation page, dedicated to Paulus Repelaer and dated 1826, with signatures. The second (and best) edition of Bentley's Terence, which also includes the Fables of Phaedrus and the Sentences of Publilius Syrus. The first edition was published in Cambridge the previous year, but "that of Amsterdam, according to Harwood, is the most valuable, as Bentley communicated to Wetstein, the publisher, many additional notes and emendations" (Dibdin). Dibdin (4th edn.) II 474. Schweiger III 1068.   Ref: 49320 
£400
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Theophrastus: (Budgell, Eustace, trans.:) The Moral Characters [...] Translated from the Greek. London: printed for Jacob Tonson, 1714. First edition.12mo., pp. [xxvi], 80, [iv], including portrait frontispiece. With two final advertisement leaves and p.79 misnumbered as p.89. Some woodcut decorations. A few faint ink smudges to frontis and title but otherwise clean. Contemporary brown calf Cambridge panelled boards, neatly rebacked with heavily gilt spine and red morocco title label, edges lightly sprinkled red, corners repaired, hinges subtly reinforced. A few slight scrapes, some patches of toning to endpapers but a very good copy. Armorial bookplate of John Cator to front paste-down, likely John Cator the landowner, timber merchant and MP (1728-1806) who commissioned the building of Beckenham Place Mansion in 1773. He was described by Fanny Burney as 'a good-natured busy sort of man' (The Diary and Letters of Madame D'Arblay, Vol. 1.). To ffep, recent bookplate of Robert J. Hayhurst. MS inscription of J[ohn] Lydall of Uxmore in Oxfordshire, dated 1768 to title-page verso. Translated by jobbing writer and sometime Member of Parliament for Mullingar, Eustace Budgell (1687-1737). In his Preface he writes that he has not in fact 'translated from the Greek' at all but has used Bruyere's French translation as his starting point. He is surprisingly scathing about his own work: 'As for our English translation, I shall say no more of it, but that it is wholly done from the French, and as it always happens in a Translation of a Translation, is everywhere flat and spiritless'. He goes on to rather unfairly place the blame for his translations's deficiencies on Bruyere: 'It might perhaps be thought too hard if I should say Monsieur Bruyere was afraid of having Theophrastus outshine himself; yet I shall make no Scruple to affirm that the Method he has used in translating him has very much taken from the Beauty of his Author.' Budgell was a cousin of Joseph Addision and assisted him with The Spectator with some success, though he later fell on hard times. Thought vain and vindictive by many of his contemporaries, he is now mostly remembered for his death: he threw himself into the Thames, leaving a note that read 'What Cato did, and Addison approved, cannot be wrong.' ESTC T86597   Ref: 51609 
£225
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