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A Kempis, Thomas: L'Imitation de Jesus-Christ. Traduction nouvelle. Paris: Chez Saillant [...] Despilly [...] Desaint, 1767. 12mo. pp. [ii], xl, 409, [iii]. Half-title, engraved frontispiece, 5 engraved plates, armorial decoration on p. v. Small tear to lower edge of frontispiece, occasional very minor spotting on plates, lower edge of plate 3 shaved, 2 leaves misbound. 18th century crimson crushed morocco, marbled endpapers, triple gilt ruled, gilt fleurons to corners, raised bands, spine gilt ruled with gilt dentelles, fleurons, stars and tendrils, inner and outer edges gilt, a.e.g., silk bookmark. Covers minimally rubbed, sympathetic repair at head of spine. Bookplate of Robert J. Hayhurst to front pastedown. Exquisitely bound French translation of Thomas a Kempis devotional masterpiece. It was prepared by Louis-Isaac Lemaistre de Sacy (1613-84), priest, humanist and author of the Bible de Port Royal, the most used translation in 18th century France. Not in Brunet.   Ref: 53165 
£200
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Ahrensdorf, Peter J.: Homer on the Gods & Human Virtue: Creating the Foundations of Classical Civilization. Cambridge University Press, 2014. First edition. 8vo., pp. x, 271. Hardback. Contents and binding mint. Dust-jacket, fine.   Ref: 53255 
£14
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Al-Khwarizmi: (Rashed, Roshdi, ed., trans. & comm.:) The Beginnings of Algebra. London: Saqi, 2009. First edition thus. Large 8vo., pp. viii, [ii], 392. Arabic text with facing-page English translation. Dark blue cloth, gilt-lettered to spine, fine. Dust-jacket, lightly creased, very good.   Ref: 53066 
£35
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Ammianus Marcellinus: (Gronovius, Jacobus, ed.:) Rerum gestarum qui de XXXI supersunt, libri XVIII. Ope MSS. codicum emendati ab Frederico Lindenbrogio & Henrico Hadrianoque Valesiis cum eorundem integris observationibus & annotationibus, item excerpta vetera de gestis Constantini & regum Italiae. Omnia nunc recognita ab Jacobo Gronovio, qui suas q Lugduni Batavorum [Leiden]: apud Petrum. Van der Aa, 1693. Folio in 4s, pp. [xlviii], 514, [xiv] + 18 plates (of which 3 are folding) including portrait frontispiece, plus 2 engraved illustrations: a large depiction of Nicaea to unpaginated leaf 2*4 verso, and a small numismatic head-piece to p.1. Bound without the binder's instructions sometimes found at rear. Title-page in red and black with engraved vignette, woodcut initials and some head- and tail-pieces. Occasional very light foxing, a few tiny scorch-holes, repaired closed tear to folding plate opposite p.125 with no loss. Contemporary Cambridge-style panelled calf with late 19th-century reback in pebble grained leather, raised bands and gilt title to spine, endpapers replaced. Joints a bit rubbed and just starting to weaken, edges worn, corners beginning to fray, a few small scuffs and scrapes, slightly toned endpapers split at hinges but boards still entirely firm. A very good copy. Two MS inscriptions to preliminary blank: Richard Pooler of Holmesdale (lightly crossed through); R. Travers Herford, 'Stand (Oxford), June 1905'. Pooler's inscription repeated on title-page, together with a short code: 'P.T.Pi. H-S-E.' The second inscription is likely that of Richard Travers Herford (18601950), the Unitarian minister and scholar of rabbinical literature. In 1886 his first published studies in Talmudics appeared in an article in The Christian Reformer entitled 'The Jerusalem Talmud'. Herford was noted as one of the first Christian scholars of the Pharisees to take a neutral view between Talmud and New Testament, and continued to work towards breaking down the prejudices of the laity. He was in London from 1914 to 1925 living and working at Dr. Williams' Library at 14 Gordon Square, where a blue plaque in his honour can still be found. The work of the 4th-century AD Roman historian Ammianus Marcellinus survives very imperfectly, with the first 18 books lost completely and only one extant significant (though corrupt) manuscript source for the remainder. Early editors Accursius and Gelen had access to an alternate manuscript tradition, now lost, which provided the text of the final books. Ammianus had detached and secular views on the rise of Christianity, and was later a favoured author of Gibbon for his 'Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire'. Here he effectively provides a continuation of the History of Tactius, covering the period 353-378. Jacobus Gronovius' (1645-1716) 1693 (first) edition is noted both for its erudition and for being particularly well illustrated. A rich culture of historical and literary cross-referencing to other classical texts is revealed in the deep footnotes, which Gronovius partially inherited from Henri de Valois, and his early seventeenth century predecessor, Friedrich Lindenbrog. He also adds Chifflet's life of Ammianus. Gronovius was a professor of Greek at Pisa and Leyden; he engaged in a series of bitter public disputes with Richard Bentley of Cambridge. An esteemed variorum edition, 'admirable' and 'highly spoken of by Ernesti and Harwood, and well known in the republic of literature [...] The vignettes are very neat.' (Dibdin). Moss quotes Harwood's opinion that Gronovius' edition is, 'very deservedly esteemed among the best edited books in Holland. The text is published with great accuracy; the notes of Gronovius are very valuable; and it is adorned with elegant figures.' The figures include: a portrait of Gronovius by van Zylvelt (frontispiece); 6 plates of Roman coins; 7 medallion portraits of Roman emperors plus a portrait of Procopius; a large folding plate with views of the Obeliscus Ramessaeus; 2 further folding plates, 1 depicting the Battle of Strasbourg and 1 the Siege of Amida, both by Romeyn de Hooghe. A 4to. version with different pagination appeared alongside this folio edition. An entry on COPAC calls for 19 plates, but we wonder whether this includes the large illustration of Nicaea on unpaginated leaf 2*4 verso, as our count of 18 matches the copy at Trinity College, Cambridge found on COPAC, as well as the digitised the copy from Lyon Public Library and other copies listed for sale. Dibdin I, 257; Moss I, 39; Schweiger II, 3   Ref: 52290 
£600
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Anacreon: Odaria, ad textus Barnesiani fidem emendata. Accedunt variae lectiones cura Eduardi Forster. Londini [London]: Sumptibus editoris excudebant Gul. Bulmer et Soc., 1802. 8vo., pp. [iv], 130. Frequent engraved head- and tail-pieces. Later green morocco, spine divided by raised bands, lettered in gilt direct, turn-ins gilt, all edges gilt. Title-page loosening, occasional minor spotting. Spine just slightly darkened, a touch of rubbing to head and corners. Armorial bookplate of Tervoe to front pastedown. An attractive printing of the Odes attributed to Anacreon, illustrated somewhat in the fashion of Pine's Horace (although the text is letterpress).   Ref: 53228 
£120
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Anacreon: (Brunck, Richard Francois Philippe, ed.:) Carmina. Accedunt Selecta Quaedam e Lyricorum Reliquiis. Argentorati [Strasbourg]: apud J.G. Treuttel, 1786. Third edition. 18mo., pp. [ii], 149, [i]. A little toned towards edges, some light patches of foxing. Green straight-grain morocco, raised bands and gilt title to spine, gilt borders, a.e.g.. Patchy colour fading, joints and corners worn, some scratches, still very good overall. Armorial bookplate of Thomas Sewell to front paste-down. "These are the most beautiful and accurate editions; the latter [i.e. this, of 1786] was twice published in the same year, and has the text of the Roman edition of Spalleti, but with corrections: it was a favourite edition" (Dibdin). Dibdin (4th edn.) I. 264.   Ref: 51271 
£95
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Anacreon; Sappho: Anacrecontis et Sapphonis Carmina. Glasguae [Glasgow]: In aedibus academicis excudebat Robertus Foulis, 1744. 8vo., pp. [iv], 108. Contemporary sprinkled calf, spine divided by raised bands. Some spotting and light browning. Label lost from second compartment, spine and edges a little darkened, slight wear to spine ends and a few scratches. Some spotting and light browning. Label lost from second compartment, spine and edges a little darkened, slight wear to spine ends and a few scratches. The larger, foolscap octavo issue, and a nicely preserved copy (apart from the loss of the spine label). Gaskell 43; ESTC T85611.   Ref: 53226 
£200
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Anacreon; Sappho: Hai tou Anakreontos odai. Kai ta tes Sapphous, kai ta tou Alkaiou leipsana. Glasguae [Glasgow]: Excudebant R. & A. Foulis, 1777. 8vo., pp. 100. Near-contemporary sprinkled calf (endpapers watermarked 1790), boards bordered with a gilt roll. Final gathering rather browned and with a dampmark in the gutter (this also just faintly visible at the beginning), first few leaves slightly dusty. Sometime (early 20th century?) rebacked in lighter brown leather, red morocco label, front hinge cracking a bit. Armorial bookplate of Walter Henry James to front pastedown, ownership inscription of H. Ellison, alumnus of Harrow School (dated July 1797) to initial blank. Gaskell lists two variants: a post 8vo and a foolscap 8vo with dagger signatures on the first leaf of most gatherings. This copy matches Gaskell's post 8vo in watermarks and collation, except that it has a dagger signature on A1 (but nowhere else). Gaskell 610; ESTC T84085.   Ref: 53227 
£150
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[Anacreon] Fawkes, Francis (ed. & trans.): The Works of Anacreon, Sappho, Bion, Moschus and Musaeus. Translated from the Original Greek. London: printed for J. Walker, J. Wallis, and J. Binns, Leeds, 1789. 2nd edition. 12mo., pp. x, 321, [iii]. English translations with notes, index to rear. A few light spots, paper taking on a blue tinge towards rear. Contemporary tan speckled calf, gilt-ruled spine with red label, gilt board edges. A little glue visible to head-cap, tail-cap worn, corner tips fraying very slightly but still very good. Francis Fawkes' (bap. 1720, d. 1777) translation of Anacreon first appeared anonymously in 1760. Fawkes was a prolific and skilled poet and translator, and a somewhat less committed clergyman: 'Overall, Fawkes's clerical career was undistinguished; in an age that tolerated much laxity in its parsons, he seems to have pursued enjoyment to the detriment of ambition. It is in some ways a fitting career for so effortless a classicist: Epicurus, with his injunction to live in happy obscurity, would not have disapproved.' (ODNB). ESTC T85627   Ref: 52264 
£95
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Anderson, Michael Alan: St. Anne in Renaissance Music: Devotion and Politics. Cambridge University Press, 2014. First edition. Large 8vo., pp. xvii, 345. Illustrations, Tables and musical Examples to text. Hardback. Contents and binding mint. Dust-jacket, fine.   Ref: 53254 
£35
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