Antiquarian Booksellers Association
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Anon: (Smith, Dulcie Lawrence, trans.; Smith, Eileen Lawrence, illus.:) Aucassin and Nicolete. A Twelfth-Century Romance. London: Andrew Melrose, 1914. 4to., pp. [iv], 69, [i] + plates, some colour. Printed in red and black. Quarter faux-vellum, blue paper-covered boards, gilt title to spine and upper board, t.e.g., other edges uncut. Internally bright and clean. Spine a little grayed, free endpapers toned, otherwise very good indeed. An anonymous medieval French chantefable, or combination of prose and verse, known from only one survivng manuscript discovered in 1752 by Jean-Baptiste de la Curne de Sainte-Palaye.   Ref: 51159 
£40
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Banks, Iain: The Bridge. London: Macmillan, 1986. First edition, signed by the author. 8vo., pp. [x], 259, [i]. Very slightly toned towards page edges. Blue cloth, gilt title to spine, very vague crease to headcap but very good overall. Autographed to title-page. When interviewed by SFX Magazine in 1994 The Bridge was Banks' favourite of his novels, as well the one he thought to be technically the best. "Definitely the intellectual of the family, it's the one that went away to University and got a first. I think The Bridge is the best of my books."('The Books of Iain Banks - and Iain M. Banks')   Ref: 51373 
£175
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Bayle, [Pierre]: Dictionnaire Historique et Critique, [...] Revue, Corrigée, et Augmentée par L'Auteur. Rotterdam: chez Michel Bohm, 1720. 3rd edition. 4 vols., folio (410 x 260mm), pp. [vi], xx, 942, [ii]; [iv], [945]-962, 963*-968*, 963-1830, [ii]; [iv], [1833]-2680; [iv], [2681]-3132, [xciv]. Half-title to vols. II-IV, but lacking in vol.I. Continuously paginated; body of text printed predominantly in double columns, with printed marginalia. Last leaves of vols. I and II are blanks. Vol. II contains two notices of David, king of Israel: one at p. 963-968; the other (altered in deference to the censures of the Consistory of the Walloon church at Rotterdam) is inserted at p. 963*-968*. Red and black vignette title-page to each volume, the first volume's Dedication also in red and black; elaborate engraved head-piece at start of vol. I, wood cut initials and tail-pieces, some typographic end-pieces. Front and rear blanks and endpapers toned, half-titles a little foxed, very light toning to occasional leaves. To vol. I some small rust-coloured marks to lower margins of C gathering, to vol. IV a little worming to gutter margin near tail end. Contemporary brown calf, recently rebacked with raised bands and dark red and black gilt spine labels, edges sprinkled red. Spines slightly mottled, boards rubbed, corners neatly repaired. Very good, sturdy set. Armorial bookplate of the Whig politician John Orlebar (1697 - 1765) to verso of each title-page. Publication of the first edition of Bayle's Dictionaire began in 1697. Bayle (1647-1706), a displaced French Hugenot who spent much of his life in Rotterdam, effectively created one of the first encyclopaedias (before the term was commonly used) of ideas and how they originated. He asserted that many things that were considered to be 'true' were in fact just opinions, and that gullible and stubborn thinking had led to their acceptance as fact. The Dictionaire continued to be an important work of scholarship for several generations, and had considerable impact on intellectual life: 'subsequent writers of the French Enlightenment, Diderot, for example, made ample use of Bayle's Dictionnaire. The work was also not without some influence on the German Aufklãrung. In 1767 Frederick the Great wrote to Voltaire that Bayle had begun the battle, that a number of English philosophers had followed in his wake, and that Voltaire was destined to finish the fight.' (Copleston Vol.6 (1994), p.8).   Ref: 52413 
£1200
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Blackmore, Richard: Prince Arthur. An Heroick Poem. In ten books. London: Printed for Awnsham and John Churchil, 1695. First edition. Folio, pp. [xx], 296. Title within plain borders. A few light smudges, but internally bright and clean. Near-contemporary speckled calf, raised bands, paper label to second compartment with title inked in an old hand, blind tooled borders, edges sprinkled red. Loss to headcap, joints worn, calf split at upper joint but cords holding firm, a few light scuffs, edges worn, top corners bumped and fraying, endpapers split at hinges, patch of skinning to front paste-down likely fron the removal of a bookplate. A very good copy. Small library code inked to front paste-down. The first edition (the second followed the same year, and included an idex) of Richard Blackmore's (1654-1729) celebration of William III in the form of an epic based on The Aeneid using historical material from Geoffrey of Monmouth. King William rewarded Blackmore with the post of physician-in-ordinary. Blackmore was less successful with other poets, and is the target of particular scorn from Pope in The Dunciad and other satires. ESTC R23258.   Ref: 51084 
£750
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Block, Lawrence: Hit List. New York: HarperCollins, 2000. First edition. 8vo., pp. [viii], 296. Quarter black cloth, black boards, red-lettered spine. Top edge dusty but still a very good copy indeed. Author signed to title-page. The second of Block's five works featuring the hitman Keller.   Ref: 50459 
£20
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Bobbin, Tim, pseud. [Collier, John]; (Cruikshank, G., illus.:) Lancashire Dialect; and Poems. Rendered intelligible to general readers by a literal interpretation, and the obsolete words explained by quotations from the most early of the English authors. London: Hurst, Chance and Co., 1828. 8vo., pp. viii, 184, + 6 leaves of plates. Occasional foxing, plates quite toned and spotted. Slightly later half olive green calf with marbled paper-covered boards, raised bands, red spine label, marbled edges. Spine darkened to brown, a bit chipped, headcap and corners worn, a good sound copy. Bookseller's pencilled note to ffep verso. Contains works in prose and verse by Tim Bobbin, a pseudonym of the caricaturist and satirist John Collier (1708-1796), illustrating the South Lancashire dialect. Tomlinson 70   Ref: 51258 
£60
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[Bookselling ephemera] Sidney Kiek & Son advertisement. London: Sidney Kiek & Son, n.d.(c.1900). Single leaf advertisement (160 x 78mm) for the firm's Clearance Lists, 'The small prices at which many good books, perfectly NEW, are sold off after the first demand has been met will astonish you.' Sidney Kiek & Son were theological booksellers and publishers.   Ref: 51672 
£10
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Box, Edgar, pseud. [Vidal, Gore]: Death Likes It Hot. London: William Heinemann, 1955. First UK edition. 8vo., pp.[iv], 212. Black cloth, gilt title to spine. Patches of staining to fore-edge corners of free endpapers front and rear (possibly from metal clips?) transferring a little to half-title and final leaf, edges lightly toned, good. Small inkstamp of Tyrell's Book Shop, Pacific Highway to front paste-down. Originally published in the US in 1954, Death Likes it Hot was the last of Vidal's Edgar Box novels. The pseudonym allowed him to earn a living while the controversy surrounding the publication of his 1948 novel The City and the Pillar died down.   Ref: 51550 
£40
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Browne, Thomas: The Works. Edited by Geoffrey Keynes. (comprising of) I. Religio Medici Christian Morals. A Letter to a Friend. II. Pseudodoxia Epidemica Books I-III. III. Pseudodoxia Epidemica Books IV-VII. IV.Hydriotaphia Brampton Urns. The Garden of Cyrus. V. Letters. VI. M London: Faber & Gwyer Limited, 1928-31. 6 vols. 8vo., portrait frontispieces Bound in blue cloth gilt, top edges gilt and others untrimmed, spines sunned, a bit shelf-worn but a good, firm set. Pencilled marginalia to some volumes, copious to Vol. II, to which vol. a printed portrait of the author has been added to front pastedown.   Ref: 29743 
£180
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[Calverley, Charles Stuart]: Verses and Translations. Cambridge; London: Deighton, Bell, and Co.; Bell & Daldry, 1862. First edition. 8vo., pp. vi, 203, [i]. Occasional light foxing mostly affecting first few leaves. Contemporary dark red cloth, gilt title to spine, top edge a bit dusty. Spine cocked, a bit rubbed, endcaps beginning to fray, cloth lifting slightly from centre of upper board. Still a good copy Ownership inscription of Geo. P. Howes. Pemb. Coll., August 1862 to half-title. Obituary of the author pasted to front paste-down. To the title-page, beneath the line 'by C.S.C.', Howes has added 'C.S. Calverley, M.A., Fellow of Christi Coll. Cambridge.' A collection of original verses, and translations from Horace, Virgil, Theocritus, Lucretius and Homer. Charles Stuart Calverley (formerly Blayds) (18311884)was famous during his time as a pupil at Harrow School for his athleticism and his incredible ability to memorise books of the Iliad at short notice. His talent for writing Latin verse was apparent at an early age and won him a scholarship to Balliol College, Oxford, in 1850. 'There he won the chancellor's prize in 1851 for a Latin poem, which confirmed his high academic standing. However, he was sent down in January 1852 for disciplinary offences involving excessive drunkenness and the illicit keeping of dogs in his rooms. In the following October he entered Christ's College, Cambridge, having changed his name from Blayds to Calverley to evade the disgrace following him from Oxford. He won the Craven scholarship in 1854, the Camden medal in 1853 and 1855, the Browne medal (Greek ode) in 1855, and the members' prize for a Latin essay in 1856, graduating second class in the classical tripos that year. Two years later he was elected a fellow of Christ's. His academic success was the more remarkable because his inherent laziness and love of socializing prevented him from studying regularly. His friends had to drag him out of bed by force, or lock him in his rooms to ensure that he concentrated on his work. He made friends with many prominent members of his college, including professors John Robert Seeley, Walter William Skeat, and John Hales, Walter Besant, and Dr Robert Liveing. His parodies and other humorous verses were well known among fellow students by the time of the publication of Verses and Translations in 1862. This collection of gently parodic poems concentrated upon a comfortable and leisured upper-middle-class world and became extremely popular. In 1894 a fourteenth edition was published, and the book was issued as a Pocket Book Classic twenty years after his death. The Athenaeum wished that 'some of our prolific small poets would write as good poetry in earnest as Mr Calverley does in play'.' (ODNB)   Ref: 52032 
£20
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