Antiquarian Booksellers Association
Unsworth's Booksellers
International League of Antiquarian Booksellers

Box, Edgar, pseud. [Vidal, Gore]: Death Likes It Hot. London: William Heinemann, 1955. First UK edition. 8vo., pp.[iv], 212. Black cloth, gilt title to spine. Patches of staining to fore-edge corners of free endpapers front and rear (possibly from metal clips?) transferring a little to half-title and final leaf, edges lightly toned, good. Small inkstamp of Tyrell's Book Shop, Pacific Highway to front paste-down. Originally published in the US in 1954, Death Likes it Hot was the last of Vidal's Edgar Box novels. The pseudonym allowed him to earn a living while the controversy surrounding the publication of his 1948 novel The City and the Pillar died down.   Ref: 51550 
£40
enquire
Browne, Thomas: The Works. Edited by Geoffrey Keynes. (comprising of) I. Religio Medici Christian Morals. A Letter to a Friend. II. Pseudodoxia Epidemica Books I-III. III. Pseudodoxia Epidemica Books IV-VII. IV.Hydriotaphia Brampton Urns. The Garden of Cyrus. V. Letters. VI. M London: Faber & Gwyer Limited, 1928-31. 6 vols. 8vo., portrait frontispieces Bound in blue cloth gilt, top edges gilt and others untrimmed, spines sunned, a bit shelf-worn but a good, firm set. Pencilled marginalia to some volumes, copious to Vol. II, to which vol. a printed portrait of the author has been added to front pastedown.   Ref: 29743 
£180
enquire
Burchill, Julie and Parsons, Tony: "The Boy Looked at Johnny", The Obituary of Rock and Roll. London: Pluto Press, 1982. Third impression, original paperback first edition. 8vo., pp.96. Illustrated card covers. Spine a little faded, some slight smudgy marks to white rear cover, very good. First published 1978, second impression 1980, this third impression 1982.   Ref: 51646 
£35
enquire
[Calverley, Charles Stuart]: Verses and Translations. Cambridge; London: Deighton, Bell, and Co.; Bell & Daldry, 1862. First edition. 8vo., pp. vi, 203, [i]. Occasional light foxing mostly affecting first few leaves. Contemporary dark red cloth, gilt title to spine, top edge a bit dusty. Spine cocked, a bit rubbed, endcaps beginning to fray, cloth lifting slightly from centre of upper board. Still a good copy Ownership inscription of Geo. P. Howes. Pemb. Coll., August 1862 to half-title. Obituary of the author pasted to front paste-down. To the title-page, beneath the line 'by C.S.C.', Howes has added 'C.S. Calverley, M.A., Fellow of Christi Coll. Cambridge.' A collection of original verses, and translations from Horace, Virgil, Theocritus, Lucretius and Homer. Charles Stuart Calverley (formerly Blayds) (18311884)was famous during his time as a pupil at Harrow School for his athleticism and his incredible ability to memorise books of the Iliad at short notice. His talent for writing Latin verse was apparent at an early age and won him a scholarship to Balliol College, Oxford, in 1850. 'There he won the chancellor's prize in 1851 for a Latin poem, which confirmed his high academic standing. However, he was sent down in January 1852 for disciplinary offences involving excessive drunkenness and the illicit keeping of dogs in his rooms. In the following October he entered Christ's College, Cambridge, having changed his name from Blayds to Calverley to evade the disgrace following him from Oxford. He won the Craven scholarship in 1854, the Camden medal in 1853 and 1855, the Browne medal (Greek ode) in 1855, and the members' prize for a Latin essay in 1856, graduating second class in the classical tripos that year. Two years later he was elected a fellow of Christ's. His academic success was the more remarkable because his inherent laziness and love of socializing prevented him from studying regularly. His friends had to drag him out of bed by force, or lock him in his rooms to ensure that he concentrated on his work. He made friends with many prominent members of his college, including professors John Robert Seeley, Walter William Skeat, and John Hales, Walter Besant, and Dr Robert Liveing. His parodies and other humorous verses were well known among fellow students by the time of the publication of Verses and Translations in 1862. This collection of gently parodic poems concentrated upon a comfortable and leisured upper-middle-class world and became extremely popular. In 1894 a fourteenth edition was published, and the book was issued as a Pocket Book Classic twenty years after his death. The Athenaeum wished that 'some of our prolific small poets would write as good poetry in earnest as Mr Calverley does in play'.' (ODNB)   Ref: 52032 
£20
enquire
Campbell, Thomas: The Pleasures of Hope, with Other Poems. Edinburgh: printed for Mundell, Doig, & Stevenson; London: J. Murray, 1808. 9th edition. 8vo., pp. [vi], 134, 17, [i] + 4 plates. Sporadic foxing largely affecting plates. Contemporary tan tree calf, gilt double-lines to spine, traces of missing label. Upper joint splitting but cords holding firm, Spine rubbed and a bit chipped but still good overall. Ownership inscription to title-page: 'Letitia Prichard's, October 10th 1814'. On 27 April 1799 Mundell published Campbell's The Pleasures of Hope. It was an immediate success, and created eager expectations of future greatness. [...] The poem's popularity is an indication of the prevailing taste, still far more at ease with eighteenth-century didactic poetry than with the innovations of Wordsworth and Coleridge's Lyrical Ballads. But the poem was also fortunate in its timing. It was peculiarly welcome to those in sympathy with political reform who were at their most despondent over the bloodshed of the French Revolution. Campbell's poem found ways of asserting radical sentiments that avoided the deadly charge of association with 'French principles'. He denounced the destroyers of Polish liberty, and breathed vengeance on the oppressors of India and supporters of the slave trade. A second part was equally welcome in its rejection of a scepticism that reduced humanity to a 'frail and feverish being of an hour' (The Pleasures of Hope, line 338). But Campbell never had confidence that he could sustain the reputation thus early established. He was unable to develop his next poetical project, a celebration of Edinburgh to be called 'The Queen of the North', beyond a few fragments.' (ODNB)   Ref: 51823 
£40
enquire
Casanova, (Giacomo Girolamo): Mémoires de J. Casanova de Seingalt Écrits Par Lui-Méme. Suivis de Fragments des Mémoires du Prince de Ligne. Paris: Garnier Frères, 1910. 8 vols.. Nouvelle edition, 8vo., pp. xxxi, [i], 478; 509, [i]; 503, [i]; 512; 546; 533, [i]; 538; 534, [ii], xxxvi. Illustrations in the text. Publisher's catalogue to rear of volume VIII (a little toned). Occasional annotations. Later red cloth, gilt titles to spines, edges lightly sprinkled blue. A few light dusty marks, top edges dusty but overall very good indeed. 'Collationnée sur l'édition originale de Leipsick.'   Ref: 49803 
£60
enquire
Chatwin, Bruce: The Viceroy of Ouidah. London: Jonathan Cape, 1980. First edition. 8vo., pp.[iv], 155, [I]. Internally clean. Slight gap between half-title and title, due to backing. Brown cloth, gilt title to spine. Top edge a little dusty, near fine. First edition copy of Chatwin's second published work.   Ref: 50437 
£30
enquire
Chaucer, Geoffrey; (Skeat, Walter W., ed.:) The Canterbury Tales. Volume I, Text; Volume II, Notes. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1924 2nd edition. 2 vols., 8vo., pp. xxxii, 667. [i]; xxvi, [ii], 515, [i]. Very faintly toned. Black cloth, gilt titles to spine. Endcaps slightly creased, light shelf wear, top edges dusty. Ownership inscription of D. Bruce dated 1966 to front paste-down of Notes volume. A few pencilled bookseller's notes to endpapers of each volume. A 1924 impression of the 1900 second edition (first edition published 1894). Vols. IV & V of the Complete Works.   Ref: 52161 
£40
enquire
Cooper, Artemis: Patrick Leigh Fermor: An Adventure. London: John Murray, 2012. First edition, second impression. 8vo., pp. xiii, [iii], 448. Blue cloth, gilt title to spine. Near fine. Author's inscription to Pamela Egremont (a close friend of Fermor's) to title-page.   Ref: 51641 
£25
enquire
Cowley, Abraham: The Works of Mr. Abraham Cowley. In two volumes... The eleventh edition. [With:] Volume the Second. [And:] The third and Last Volume... The ninth edition. London: Printed for J. Tonson; Charles Harper, 1710; 1711. 3 vols., 8vo., pp. [iv], LXXVIII, [viii], 392 + engraved portrait frontispiece and 17 engraved plates (of which 13 are portraits); [ii], [393]-894, [ii] + engraved frontispiece and 9 engraved plates (of which 6 are portraits); [xxii], 495, [ix] + engraved frontispiece and another 4 engraved plates. Lightly browned, a little minor spotting. Contemporary calf, plain spines with red morocco labels, boards bordered in blind, edges sprinkled red, rubbed at extremities, neatly conserved by Chris Weston replacing original labels, f.f.e.p. removed from first vol. Early ink ownership inscription "Anne Pitt" on front flyleaf of vols. 2 & 3; large amorial bookplate of "John Borthwick / CROOKSTON" on versos of title-pages. The first volume contains the major poems and several essays, while the second volume reprints Cowley's juvenilia and university plays. ESTC T133366; T133364.   Ref: 36434 
£225
enquire