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[Augustine of Hippo, Saint] Augustinus, Aurelius: (Sommalius, R.P.H. ed.:) [...] Libri XII Confessionum. Ad 3 MSS. exemp. emendati [...] Coloniae Agrippinae [Cologne]: Sumptibus Cornelii ab Egmond et sociorum, 1649. 24mo. 430pp., [xxvi] (including final blank) with engraved title page of St. Augustine's conversion-vision. Minimal toning, the odd very light marginal water stain. Contemporary sheep, marbled endpapers, gilt pointillé single ruling with gilt fleurons to corners, raised bands, spine gilt ruled into six compartments, five with gilt fleurons, one gilt-lettered. Covers a trifle rubbed. Bookplate of Robert J. Hayhurst to front pastedown. A pocket edition of the 'Confessions', indexed, exquisitely bound and with an attractive title-page. Not in Brunet.   Ref: 53162 
£200
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Aurelius Victor, Sextus: (Arntzenius, J., ed.:) Historia Romana, cum notis integris [...] Amstelodami [Amsterdam]: apud Janssonio Waesbergios. Trajecti Batav. [Utrecht]: apud Jacobum a Pools 1733. 4to., pp. [xlviii], 668, [cxxxiv] (including one full-page engraving) + additional engraved title-page. Title page in red and black with engraved vignette, illustrations (mostly numismatic) and a few decorations. Sudden heavy foxing from p.201 diminishing towards approx. p.257, occasional small scorch marks never affecting more than a letter or two. Contemporary brown marbled calf, raised bands, orange gilt label to spine, edges coloured yellow. Spine and corners rubbed, tiny tear to headcap, joints wearing a little but a very good copy. Arms of the Dutch city of Leeuwarden, capital of Friesland, in gilt to centre of each board. Illegible pencilled signature to ffep. The text is a new recension by Arntzenius, based on the work of Schott. Dibdin includes this edition on his list of best quarto variora, and notes: 'It is certainly an elaborate performance [...] the edition is indispensable to the collector's library.' Dibdin (4th edn.) I 343; Schweiger II 1136; Graesse VII, 299   Ref: 51544 
£275
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Ausonius, Decimus Magnus; Martialis, Marcus Valerius; Catullus, Tibullus & Propertius: Opera, Ex Recognitione Josephi Scaligeri Jul. Caes. F.; Epigrammaton libri XII. Xeniorum liber I. Apopharetorum liber I.; [Works]. [Leiden:] ex officina Plantiniana Raphelengii, 1605; 1606; 1601. 3 works in 1 volume. 24mo., pp. 238, [i]; 272; 213, [iii], includes final blanks to first and last works. Woodcut printer's device to each title-page. Very slightly toned, lower fore-edge corners of leaf N2 of Ausonius and leaf G2 of Catullus torn away though not affecting text apart from the latter's catchword. Contemporary semi-limp vellum, recent red leather and gilt title label to spine, edges coloured red. Both paste-downs lifted, exposing some scraps of vellum MS used as sewing supports. A little cocked, spine slightly creased, a few smudgy marks but very good. A few pencilled bookseller's notes to front endpapers. Small inscription of an illegible name in an old hand to front paste-down recto. 20th-century bookplate ('Georgii Fletcher et Amicorum') to front paste-down verso. Three pocket-sized editions of classical works from the Plantin press, all scarce in the UK with COPAC finding no copies of the Ausonius, one BL copy of the 1606 Martial and only 1587, 1603 and 1613 editions of the Catullus rather than the 1601 found here (WorldCat finds one copy of the 1601 Catullus in Leiden University Library). Schweiger (II, 80) mentions the 1603 edition of Catullus, but no others. Francois Raphelengien joined the Plantin press as a corrector in 1564 and remained there for 25 years until the death of Christopher Plantin, from whom inherited the Leiden branch of the press. Francois died in 1597, followed by his son and heir Christopher only three years later. These works date from the time of his second son Francois II, who was not appointed as printer to the University as his predecessors had been, and who sold the business in 1619.   Ref: 52191 
£650
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Boswell, James: An Account of Corsica, the Journal of a Tour to that Island; and Memoirs of Pascal Paoli. Illustrated with a new and accurate map of Corsica. Glasgow: printed by Robert and Andrew Foulis for Edward and Charles Dilly, London, 1768. First edition. 8vo., pp. xxi, [iii], 382 + folding map (2nd state). Engraved vignette to title. Occasional very light offsetting, a few spots and smudges with p.1 a little foxed, map with repaired tear near gutter but no loss. Contemporary brown calf boards rebacked neatly but in a much lighter mustard shade, raised bands gilt ruled, burgundy and green morocco labels, plain double filet gilt borders, armorial gilt centrepiece of Londonderry Public Library to upper board. Rubbed, corners bumped particularly the top fore-edge corner of the upper board, endpapers a little toned at edges. A good, sound copy. Old MS library code to ffep verso. A number of variants exist, but in this copy: D2 is in its first state with 'John Home' after the first quotation; E2 and Z3 are cancels (with the correct spelling of Mariani on p.357 and 'Is-' at the end of line 11 on p.67); the last words of line 6, p.93 are "prince of" rather than the misspelling "prince fo"; line 18, p.296 are ends "of my own" rather than "my own of". First edition copy of Boswell's first substantial work, which was published in February of 1768. 'His meetings with Rousseau inspired Boswell to make a bold journey to Corsica [in 1764-5] to meet General Pasquale Paoli, leader of the insurgents seeking the island's independence from the Genoese [...] After a difficult inland journey he met and had conversations (22 to 27 October) in Sollacarò with Paoli, who at first suspected he was a spy, but who quickly came to like his improbable young visitor, saw an opportunity for promotion of the Corsican cause in Britain, and consented to a series of interviews. Boswell's trip was both arduous and dangerous. He suffered painfully from ingrowing toenails, the result of trudging long distances in inadequate boots, and he contracted malaria, but the experience none the less exhilarated him. He remarked in 1783: 'I had got upon a rock in Corsica and jumped into the middle of life' (Boswelliana, 328). [...] With its reports of the gallant islanders and a Plutarchan depiction of Paoli paralleled with several classical heroes, [An Account of Corsica] was an immediate success. The work was widely read and translated, stimulated great interest in Paoli and the Corsican cause, brought its author wide fame in Britain and Europe, and found an interested readership among the Americans. It attracted the notice of the French government (which had a translation made), and though Boswell's ambition for British intervention was not to be fulfilled, he probably influenced Britain's decision to send secret supplies of arms to the Corsicans.' (ODNB) ESTC T26157; Gaskell 473   Ref: 52306 
£600
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Boxhorn, Marc Zuerius: (Hartnack, Daniel, ed.:) Chronologia praecipuorum universi orbis imperiorum, regnorum, principatuum, rerumque, publicarum ortus, mutationes, atque occasus designans. Edita atque plurimis additionibus & continuatione usque in praesentem annum aucta a Daniele Hartnaccio [...] Budissae [Budissina]: impensis Friderici Arnstii, typis Johannis Rudolphi Leonis, 1688. Folio, pp. [iv], 251, [i] + 4 folding tables at rear. Title-page in red and black, a few woodcut ornaments. Lightly toned with occasional light foxing, title-page more heavily affected. Some paper repairs to the back of each plate, mostly to edges and attachments, plus a little foxing. Contemporary vellum, edges sprinkled blue. Vellum a bit grubby with a few spots and smudges, a little light foxing to endpapers and their hinges reinforced. A very good copy. To ffep, inscription of Ant. Johnson; to title-page, ex libris inscription possibly in the name of Grosvenor, dated April 26th 1805. Boxhorn (1612-1653), a politician and linguist, was in 1648 successor to Daniel Heinsius as Professor of History at the university of Leiden. Chronologia consists mainly of three-column tables showing important events in both world and church history set next to the reigning monarch of the time.   Ref: 52222 
£225
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Calpurnius Siculus, Titus; Nemesianus, Marcus Aurelius Olympius: Bucolica. Nuper a situ, & squallore vindicata, nouisque commentarijs exposita opera, ac studio Roberti Titii Burgensis. Florentiae [Florence]: Apud Philippum Iunctam, 1590. 4to., pp. [viii], 206, [4]. Later limp vellum (binder's waste containing 17th century printed matter), spine lettered in ink, lower edge of text-block also lettered in ink. Small stain to upper forecorner at beginning and end, a little spotting elsewhere. Binding somewhat soiled, ties lost. Old paper shelfmark label to spine, old inscription to final page of text ('C. de ? Torrepalma?'). The Eclogues of Calpurnius Siculus, Roman poet of uncertain date (though certainly post-Virgil) and Marcus Aurelius Olympius Nemesianus of the 3rd-century AD, as edited by Roberto Titi (1551-1609), professor at Bologna. Eleven bucolic poems survive in the manuscript tradition attributed to Calpurnius, though four were obviously of different authorship and are now firmly placed under Nemesianus's name The editio princeps was printed by Sweynheym and Pannartz and numerous editions followed, with this one having some of the most substantial commentary, including Titi's work and commentary in the form of a letter by Ugolino Martelli (1519-1592). Adams C155; CNCE 47089.   Ref: 53229 
£600
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Catullus, Gaius Valerius; Tibullus, Albius; Propertius, Sextus: Opera. Birminghamiae [Birmingham]: Johannis Baskerville, 1772. 4to. pp. [ii], 200, 221-372 (i.e. 352, due to usual pagination error). Sporadic light foxing, narrow patch of toning to gutter margin of pp.136-7 seemingly transferred from a ribbon bookmark. a few small pencilled bookseller's notes to front endpapers. 19th-century dark brown straight-grain morocco, spine heavily gilt, boards with gilt and blind tooled frame and borders, all edges gilt, green endpapers. Some surface wear to joints, lightly shelf worn, lower corner of rear board a bit bumped. A very good copy, handsomely bound. Bookplate with crest (small piece of lower corner torn away), of Henry Disbrowe of All Souls. According to Alumni Oxonienses this is likely Henry John Disbrowe of Launceston, a fellow of All Soul's College, Oxford from 1816. He became rector of Welbourne in Lincoln in 1820 and remained there until his death in 1867. To rfep recto, pencilled inscription of Thomas Thorp dated Dec. 2nd 1938. Leaves A2 and H3, often cancelled, are both found here in their original state; misnumeration and other errors as usual. Also available in 12mo., this 4to. version was priced on publication at a guinea, though copies were advertised for sale at 18s. on 9th July 1773; 780 copies remained in stock in 1775. Dibdin describes this edition, based on Coustelier's 1743 production, as 'very beautiful', though 'not esteemed for accuracy' (Dibdin I (4th edn.) 377). ESTC T6260; Gaskell 44; Graesse 287; Moss 1263   Ref: 52193 
£600
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Catullus, Gaius Valerius; Tibullus, Albius; Propertius, Sextus: (Gahagan, Usher, ed.:) Opera. Londini [London]: Typis J. Brindley, sumptibus J. Murray, 1774. 2 vols. in 1, 12mo., pp. [iv], 132, 120. The 'second volume' without title-page, as issued. Contemporary russia, boards bordered in blind, spine divided by raised bands, second compartment gilt-lettered direct others with blind tools. A little minor spotting. Binding a bit rubbed, some light marks to boards. The bookseller and bookbinder to the Prince of Wales John Brindley (fl. 1713-1758) had produced a series of Latin classics in 12mo in the 1740s and 1750s, edited by Usher Gahagan. This slightly mysterious little volume retains Brindley's name in the imprint, despite being published some 15 years after his death; the BBTI has a separate entry for a J. Brindley of London active only in 1774, probably as a result of this. Added to the imprint here is the name of John Murray, making this an early publication by thefounder of that publishing dynasty (who had set up trade in 1768), in the same year that the ending of perpetual copyright gave Murray's business a significant boost. Furthermore, there is a new preface, dated 1773 and signed by the scholar Edward Harwood, who appears nonetheless not to have had much of a hand in the text, since the body of the volume is a line-for-line reprint of the 1749 Brindley edition (with different type ornaments). The book is scarce, with ESTC locating copies in the BL, Glasgow, NLS (actually a microfilm), the Rylands (not found in their OPAC), the National Trust and Private Collections, plus just Harvard and the Newberry in the USA. ESTC T101092.   Ref: 53230 
£150
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Cicero, Marcus Tullius; (Gruter, Jan; Gulielmus, Jan, eds.:) Opera Omnia Quae Exstant, ex sola fere` codd mss. fide emendata studio atq[ue] industria Jani Gulielmii & Jani Gruteri additis notis & indd: accuratiss: confectis. Hamburgi [Hamburg]: Ex bibliopolio Frobeniano, 1618. 4 vols. in 2. Folio bound in 8s, pp. [xx], 34, [ii], 255, [i], 590; 417, [i], 461, [i]. Engraved title-page with vignette; woodcut initials, head- and tail-pieces. Printed on notoriously poor paper, hence toning and foxing of varying severity. To first vol., a closed tear to 2G6 affecting a few letters; second vol. title-page detached but wholly present, gathering 2Z misbound. Occasional light dampstaining; some spots of wax and ink, closed marginal tears and tiny instances of worming. Contemporary speckled calf, raised bands, gilt spines, edges sprinkled red. Much rubbed and scuffed, endcaps rubbed with loss to first vol., corners worn, turn-ins peeling, endpapers rumpled. A tired copy, but of a work with an interesting scholarly history. Ownership inscriptions of Henri van der Lijndin dated 1659 to each title-page. A fifth volume followed in 1619. 'This edition was formerly of some authority, and followed by a great number of succeeding editors; but with the disadvantage of bad paper and bad type, it unites many errors and absurdities; adopting the palpable incorrectness of MSS. in lieu of the emendations of learned men, who had restored the text of Cicero in a manner unexceptionable to every other critic but to the blind obstinacy of Gruter. Consult Ernesti's preface to his own edit. p.xlii; Harles, Introd. Lit. Rom. t.ii. 56; Bipont. Edit. xcii-iii.; and Beck's preface, p. xxxvi-vii; all of which authorities unite in bestowing a severe chastisement on Gruter.' (Dibdin) A good deal of scholarly work has been done on this edition, including attempts to explain where Gruter (1560-1627) went so wrong. His work was based on the edition of Gulielmus (Jan Wilhelms, 1555-84), whose project had been to use a large number of French and German manuscripts to compile an edition of Cicero's works based on manuscript readings only, without editorial conjectures. In the late 1980's, P.L. Schmidt identified Gulielmus's own copy of Cicero, 'containing all his collations and conjectures, a remarkable discovery.' The edition was Lambinus's (1577-8). Close examination by D.H. Berry throws light on Gruter's methods: '[it] was this copy which Gulielmius used to collate the Erfurtensis, and thus the readings he recorded need no longer be taken at second hand from Gruter, but may now be had direct from Gulielmius himself. The authorities at Leiden have with great generosity supplied me with photographs of the relevant pages of Lambinus' edition, with the result that I have been able to compare against one another Gulielmius' collation, Gruter's version of it and the readings given by Zinzerling. This examination has revealed various deficiencies in Gruter's reports which have, naturally, permeated all subsequent editions. In particular, Gruter recorded only a selection of the reports noted by Gulielmius, while his manner of recording has been found to have been imprecise and consequently misleading: where Gulielmius reported only one word from E, Gruter's method was to cite the whole clause without indicating which word had occurred in E and which had simply been taken from the deteriores on which his edition was predominantly based.' (The Classical Quarterly, Vol. 39, No. 2 (1989), pp. 400-407). Dibdin I (4th edn.) 400   Ref: 49893 
£400
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[Claudian] Claudianus, Claudius: (Burman, Pieter II; Heinsius, Niklaas, eds.:) Opera, quae exstant, omnia ad membranarum veterum fidem castigata [...] Amstelaedami [Amsterdam], ex officina Schouteniana, 1760. First edition thus. 4to, pp. [xiv], xxxii, [ii], 31, [v], 600, (without loss) 609-1112 (mispaginated as usual). Large paper copy, with some leaves deckled at bottom edge. Title in red and black with woodcut device, woodcut head- and tail-pieces and initials. Occasional very light foxing, some leaves with a faint line of toning across head margin and a few others unopened at head, short closed tear (seemingly the result of a paper flaw) to leaf 5R2 affecting text but not legibility. Late 18th- or early 19th-century crimson straight-grain morocco, gilt title to spine, a.e.g., ornate dentelles, green leather joints, marbled endpapers, pale blue ribbon bookmark bound in. Spine a little faded and rubbed, a few light marks, endcaps and bottom edges beginning to wear, a very good copy handsomely bound. Small gilt oval crest of Archibald Acheson, 3rd Earl of Gosford (1806-1864) to front paste-down. Round Jesuit Society inkstamp (Milltown Park, Dublin) to title-page. First edition of Pieter Burman's (1714-1778) edition of Claudian, with commentary by his uncle, Pieter Burman I, and previously unprinted notes by the neo-latin poet and classical verse scholar Niklaas Heinsius (1620-1681). Claudian of Alexandria (b. c. AD 360) was court poet under the emperor Honorius and his minister Stilicho. "In diction and technique he is the equal of Lucan and Statius, in hyperbole he perhaps outdoes them" (OCD). His poetry is also a valuable historical source. Dibdin writes that this is 'unquestionably a very superior edition, and it contains a greater fund of critical illustration than the preceding by Gesner.' Dibdin I (4th edn.) 472   Ref: 51703 
£600
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