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Isocrates: Scripta, quaequidem nunc extant, omnia, Graecolatina, postremo recognita. Basileae [Basel]: Typis Conradi Waldkirchii, 1613. 8vo., pp. [xvi] 927 [lix]. Woodcut device to title, text in Greek and Latin on facing pages, dampmark to upper corner, intermittent browning (mostly light). Early vellum boards, long sides overlapping, title inked to spine, edges sprinkled blue, a few small stains. Early ownership signature to title: 'Christianus Bartholotti ab Henne(?)'. An uncommon reprint of an edition of the Greek rhetorician Isocrates (one of the 10 'Attic Orators') that Waldkirch first published in 1602. Both Waldkirch printings are scarce; COPAC records four locations for the 1613 (Oxford, University of London, Manchester and the BL) and three for the 1602 (Nat. Lib. Scotland, Oxford, and Glasgow). The Latin translation is by Hieronymus Wolf. Schweiger I 181.   Ref: 25093 
£650
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Josephus, Flavius: (Gelenius, Sigismund, ed.:) Opera quae exstant, nempe. Geneuae [Geneva]: Jacobum Crispinum, 1634. Folio, pp. [viii], 1102, [xxviii]. Slightly toned, a little marginal worming to first few quires, blot from hot wax to p.610 affecting a couple of words and slightly marking the preceeding page, small marginal inkstain to several leaves at rear. Tan calf, gilt spine and borders. Rebacked retaining original spine, boards scratched with a little surface loss suggesting tape removal, a few worm holes to upper board, edges and corners worn, upper hinge neatly repaired. Ownership inscription of M.D. Macleod, The University, Southampton in pink ink to f.f.e.p.. Much older ink inscription of '[Glo?]espin' to front pastedown. The third Geneva printing of the second major edition of Josephus in Greek - the editio princeps appeared in 1544 and was followed by a 1591 Geneva edition reusing earlier Latin translations. There was also a printing in 1611; this is the last and by some accounts least accurate of the three, although it held its place until the next major editions appeared in the 1690s.   Ref: 46164 
£500
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Josephus, Flavius: (Hudson, John; Havercamp, Sigebert, ed.:) Quae reperiri potuerunt, opera omnia Graece et Latine, cum notis & nova versione. [...] Amstelaedami, Lugd. Bat., Ultrajecti [Amsterdam, Leiden, Utrecht]: Apud R. & G. Wetstenios, Sam. Luc 1726. 2 vols., folio, pp. [viii] 28 [xxviii] 982; [ii] 520, 481 [lxiii] + additional engraved title to vol. I, 2 numismatic plates, and 1 folding chart. Half-title to each volume, vol. I title-page in red and black, parallel Greek and Latin texts, woodcut initials. Sporadic small inkspots and scorches, a few certain leaves lightly toned suggesting occasional use of inferior paper but generally bright within. Contemporary tan calf, rebacked with heavily gilt spines retained, 2 brown morrocco labels to each spine. Title labels cracking with small losses, occasional light marks and scratches, small loss to headcap vol. II, vol. I corners fraying with the lower 2 slightly bumped. A handsome set. To each volume's front paste-down, the armorial bookplate of John Putland with '1730' added in sepia ink. In addition vol. I has a tiny note, '2 vols. coll. & perf. FCB, Jany. 1848', at the very top of the front paste-down, plus '2 vols. D.J.M.' to ffep. The date of the collational note implies that these volumes were purchased at the five-day sale of John Putland's library held by Charles Sharpe of Dublin in 1847, at which 1650 lots were auctioned on the instruction of Putland's grandson George. John Putland (1709-1773) obtained his bachelor's degree at Trinity College, Dublin in 1731 and became a Master of Divinity there in 1734, though he was never a minister. He was very active in the life of the city as member of the Spiritual Society, a patron of the arts investing particularly in theatres, and a Mason. He served as a magistrate in the 1740's, and later as High Sheriff for the Country of Dublin. Havercamp's folio edition of Josephus, a monumental summing of the then-current state of Josephan scholarship. Dibdin reminds us that although not the most accurate edition, "this work contains the readings of two MSS contained in the Leyden library, and some observations of Vossius and Cocceus found in the margin of a copy of the editio princeps". It also prints treatises on Josephus, including Daubuz on Josephus's passages relating to Christ. Dibdin (4th edn.) II 132. Schweiger I 177. Brunet III 569. Graesse III 480: "Édition la plus complète et la plus recherchée".   Ref: 51323 
£1000
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Justinus, Marcus Junianus: (Graevius, Joannes Georgius, ed.:) Historiae Philippicae, [...] cum ejusdem Castigationibus. Editio Ultima prioribus correctior. Traiecti ad Rhenum [Utrecht]: typis Guilielmi van de Water, Guilielmi Broedelet, 1708. 8vo., pp. [xxiv], 414, [cxxxviii], including additional engraved title-page. Title-page in red and black with engraved vignette. Smudged ink underlining to author's name on p.1, closed marginal tear to p.265 not affecting text. Contemporary vellum, ink title in an old hand to spine, edges speckled blue. A little soiled with some smudges and spots, corners slightly bumped, evidence of beige paper or labels removed from both paste-downs, top edge dusted. Small illegible ownership inscription and separate initials to front endpapers. 'Graevius was the first man who, on the basis of the Aldine edition as reprinted by the Juntae, corrected the errors of Bongarsius, and formed the text of Justin by sober critical rules.' (Dibdin). One of the later editions Dibdin prefers, as it contains the additional notes of Faber (1615-72), Vorst (1623-76) and Scheffer (1621-79). Also appended are Bongar's Excerptiones Chronologicae, and the Prologi Historiarum Philippicarum Pompeii Trogi. Dibdin (4th edn.) II 139; Schweiger II, 491   Ref: 46576 
£150
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Justinus, Marcus Junianus: (Graevius, Joannes Georgius, ed.:) Historiae Philippicae. Amsterodami [Amsterdam]: Henricum Wetstenium and Traiecti ad Rhenum [Utrecht]: Guillelmum van de Wat 1694. 8vo., pp. [xxiv], 378, [cxxxviii] + engraved frontispiece. Contemporary tan speckled calf, gilt spine with tan morocco label, edges sprinkled red. Spine crackled with a few small chips, joints and edges a little worn, corners bumped. 20th-century bookplate of 'J.E.' to front pastedown. Ms library code to f.f.e.p.. A variorum with the additional notes of Faber (1615-72), Vorst (1623-76) and Scheffer (1621-79), this volume forms part of the twenty-year run of editions of Justinus from 1683, although this particular edition goes unnoticed by Dibdin. Dibdin (4th edn.) II 139 (for the other editions).   Ref: 46575 
£150
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Justinus, Marcus Junianus: (Gronovius, A., ed.:) Historiae Philippicae cum integris commentariis [...] et excerptis H. Loriti Glareani atque Editoris Oxoniensis. Lugduni Batavorum [Leiden], apud Samuelum et Joannem Luchtmans 1760. 8vo., pp. [xliv] 1034 [lxxi] + frontispiece. Title-page in red and black. Light age-yellowing, light spotting, a good copy bound in contemporary vellum boards, gilt arms of Arnhem stamped on covers, red morocco gilt label; binding darkened, peeling to spine label, ties removed, loss to label. Second Abraham Gronovius edition, following that of 1719. "The edition of 1760 is considered as a standard work, in which the text of the author, with select and valuable notes, is given with great purity and accuracy" (Dibdin). Dibdin (4th edn.) II 140. Schweiger II 493.   Ref: 22470  show full image..
£225
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[Juvenal] Juvenalis, Decimus Junius: Persius Flaccus, Aulus: Iu. Iuuenalis unà cum Au. Persio nuper recogniti. Venice: Melchiorre Sessa & Pietro di Ravani, 1523. Small 8vo. (150 x 100mm), ff.80. Italic type, initial spaces with guide letters only. Light dampstaining to gutter margins, most apparent at front and rear where it spreads at head and tail, but diminishing towards centre; faint mark from a paperclip to the head margin of the first 2 leaves, necessitating a small, neat repair to the first; occasional light spots and smudges. 20th-century vellum, red morocco gilt title label to spine, endpapers renewed. A little very light shelf wear to edges, endpapers slightly foxed, a very good copy in a sympathetic modern binding. Colophon reads: 'Impressum Venetiis : Per Melchiorem Sessam & Petrum de Rauanis socios anno Domini M.D.xxiii. die 7 Februarii'. Printer's famous woodcut device of a cat with a mouse in its mouth, with initials M. S., to verso of final leaf (K8). Melchiorre Sessa (the elder) and Pietro di Ravandi were active together from 1516 to 1525. After their partnership ended both Sessa and Ravani continued to work separately. EDIT 16 49678; Graesse III, 519   Ref: 52196 
£650
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Kilburne, Richard: A Topographie or Survey of the County of Kent. With Some Chronological, Historicall, and Other Matters Touching the Same: and the Several Parishes and Places therein. London: Thomas Mabb for Henry Atkinson [...], 1659. Small 4to. (177 x 135mm), pp. [viii], 422, [xii] + portrait frontispiece. Numerous errors in pagination as usual, list of Contents incorrectly bound before the dedication rather than after. Woodcut initials and head- and tail-pieces. Occasional light smudges and spots of foxing, a little toning along head of title-page, a smudge of red pigment to tail edge of final leaf perhaps indicating the original edge colour. Late 19th- or early 20th-century brown polished sheep neatly rebacked with original spine retained, gilt title and blind tooling to spine, blind-tooled borders to boards, edges marbled, grey endpapers. A little rubbed but a very good copy overall. Recent armorial bookplate of Robert Edmund Lloyd-Roberts to front paste-down. Two MS pencil notes to the ffep verso, the first concerning the placement of the list of Contents, the second recording that this book was 'acquired at the sale at Godmersham Park, the home of Mrs Robert Tritton. 8th June 1983.' Built in 1732 by Thomas May (later Knight), Godmersham Park was inherited by Edward Austen (brother of Jane Austen) in 1794. He was a cousin of the Knight family, who had adopted him in the early 1780s; when his adoptive mother died in 1812 he changed his name to Knight. Jane was a regular visitor to Godmersham Park and is said to have used the house as a model for Mansfield Park. The house passed through several more hands before being bought in 1935 by Robert Tritton and his wife Elsie, whose death in 1983 prompted the Christie's auction mentioned above. In his 'Epistle Dedicatory', Kilburne writes of his intention to present 'the Kent of his own day', and to depict 'the county as it was before the Civil War'. Hasted, in his 1797 History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent, dismisses Kilburne's work as being 'little more than a Directory'. However, 'Kent was not well served by early topographers, and Kilburne's small survey was extensively quoted on sixteen occasions by Robert Furley and, over the years in Archaeologia Cantiana, as a first source of reference, and not without some praise. The Topographie devoted disproportionate attention to Hawkhurst: 10 pages out of 422, or, in the words of one writer, 'as much space to it as to twenty other average parishes' (Archaeologia Cantiana, 5, 1863, 59). Kilburne justified this, however: "In respect I finde not any description of this Parish it having been the place of my habitation for above twenty eight years last past (God's Providence having also there lent me an inheritance), I thought fit to enlarge my selfe upon this place. (Kilburne, 126)"'. (ODNB)   Ref: 50494 
£650
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Kirchmann, Johannes: (Long, Georgius; Gorlaeus, Abrahamus; Kornmann, Henricus:) De Annulis liber singularis. Accedunt Georgii Longi, Abrahami Gorlaei, et Henr. Kornmanni De iisdem Tractatus absolutissimi. Lugd. Batav. [Leiden], Apud Hackios, 1672. 4 works in one. 12mo., pp. [xxiv], 249, [xxvii]; 140, [xxii]; 22; 65, [iii]. Additional engraved title-page, three divisional titles bearing the same date and printer's device as title-page, one engraved illustration within the text, some woodcut initials, Latin text with some Greek excerpts. A few faint marginal stains, otherwise internally bright. Contemporary vellum, faded ink title to spine, edges lightly sprinkled brown. A little yellowed, some smudgy marks, small spot of wax (?) to upper board, pastedowns lifted and quite tattered at gutters, very good. Tiny ms note in an old hand to front paste-down. A collection of essays on the subject of rings, first published in Schleswig in 1657. Cited as a reference in the Encyclopaedia Britannica (11th Edition).   Ref: 49892 
£200
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Leland, John: The Itinerary of John Leland the Antiquary. In Nine Volumes. The Second Edition: Collated and Improved from the Original MS. With the Addition also of a General Index. Oxford: printed at the Theatre; for James Fletcher, Bookseller in the Turl, and Joseph Pote, Booksel 1745. 2nd edition. 9 vols., 8vo., pp. [xiv], xxv, [i], 146, [ii]; [iv], xvi, 139, [i]; x, 174; xvi, 172; xxviii, 166; xviii, 146; xxvi, 143, [i]; xlviii, 104, 45, [i]; xliv, [ii], 134, 83, [i] + 3 plates (2 to vol. II and 1 folding to vol. VIII). Many further illustrations in the text, index to all volumes at rear of vol. IX. Series title-page with engraved vignette. Some dampstaining to vols. IV-VI and VIII. Vol. III with short closed tear to lower margin V3, vol. IV a little foxed at front. Contemporary tan calf, spines with raised bands and single gilt tool to each compartment, gilt title labels (some lost or chipped), edges sprinkled red. Very worn, upper joint of vol.I split with board just holding on, endcaps worn, joints creased or starting, some stains and smudges to boards, endpapers a bit toned at edges. Text blocks sound, very good working copy. Mid 19th-century die-sinker style armorial bookplate of Francis Frederick Fox to front paste-down of each volume; to vol. I ffep, recent inkstamp of Dr John Samuels of Newark and some pencilled bookseller's notes. The second edition of the important 'itineraries' of the poet and antiquary John Leland (c.1503-1552), who made a number of trips around England and Wales under some kind of commission from the king to do research in libraries. Continuing his travels he made regular notes intending to produce a number of works, none of which appeared. Nonetheless, 'his undertaking was an extraordinarily ambitious one and marks the beginning of English topographical studies' (ODNB). Leland's notes found their way into the Bodleian and, recognising their importance, sub-librarian Thomas Hearne (1678-1735) arranged for their printing in 1710-12. Only 120 copies of the first edition were printed, meaning that it quickly became prohibitively expensive and very difficult to obtain. This second edition, still running to only 350 copies, followed after Hearne's death. The series title-page is dated 1745, while the individual title-pages show 1740. ESTC T135478; Upcott xxxv   Ref: 52316 
£650
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