Antiquarian Booksellers Association
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Leland, John: (Hearne, Thomas, ed.:) The Itinerary of John Leland the Antiquary, in Nine Volumes. The Second Edition: Collated and Improved from the Original MS. With the Addition also of a General Index. Oxford: printed at the Theatre, 1745. Second edition. 9 volumes, 8vo., pp. [xiv], xxv, [i], 146, [ii]; [iv], xvi, 139, [i]; x, 172, [ii]; xvi, 172; xxviii, 166; xviii, 146; xxvi, 143, [i]; xlviii, 104; 45, [i]; xliv, [ii], 134, 83, [i] + 3 plates (2 to vol.II and 1 folding to vol.VIII). Many further illustrations in the text, index to all volumes at rear of vol.VIII. A little occasional light foxing mostly limited to first and final leaves but generally very clean and bright within. Contemporary mottled calf, gilt spines with raised bands, orange morocco title labels (one partially lost), plain gilt borders, edges sprinkled red, marbled endpapers. A little rubbed, top edges slightly dusty, vols. 6, 8 & 9 upper joints just starting at tail but still an exceptionally handsome set. The second edition of the important 'itineraries' of the poet and antiquary John Leland (c.1503-1552), who made a number of trips around England and Wales under some kind of commission from the king to do research in libraries. Continuing his travels he made regular notes intending to produce a number of works, none of which appeared. Nonetheless, 'his undertaking was an extraordinarily ambitious one and marks the beginning of English topographical studies' (ODNB). Leland's notes found their way into the Bodleian and, recognising their importance, sub-librarian Thomas Hearne (1678-1735) arranged for their printing in 1710-12. Only 120 copies of the first edition were printed, meaning that it quickly became prohibitively expensive and very difficult to obtain. This second edition, still running to only 350 copies, followed after Hearne's death. The series title-page is dated 1745, while the individual title-pages show 1740. ESTC T135478   Ref: 51571 
£1000
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[Leti, Gregorio:] [Havers, George, trans.:] Il Cardinalismo di Santa Chiesa; or the History of the Cardinals of the Roman Church, From the Time of their First Creation, to the Election of the Present Pope Clement the Ninth, with a Full Account of his Conclave. In Three Parts. Written in Italian by the Author of the Nipotismo di Roma, and Faithfully Englished by G.H. London: printed for J[ohn]. S[tarkey]. and are to be sold by Dorman Newman at the Chirurgeons Armes 1670. Folio, pp. [vi], 330, [ii] + portrait frontispiece depicting Pope Clemens IX. Lacks printer's catalogue at A4, though the second catalogue at Uu2 is present. Woodcut initials and head-pieces, a little illegible MS to title-page. Paper flaw to centre of leaf L2 causing a short closed tear, affecting text but not legibility; gathering M with light stain to gutter; very occasional tiny scorch holes never affecting more than a letter or two; leaf Oo4 a little creased at foot of gutter; lower corner of leaf Ss margin lost not affecting text; occasional light spots and smudges, a few light ink blots mostly affecting p.275. Contemporary brown sheep, black gilt label to spine, edges heavily sprinkled red and blue. Very worn, a bit cocked, joints worn and splitting, chips to edges, corners fraying, endpapers split at inner hinges. A contemporary, unsophisticated, but very tired binding housing what is still a very good textblock. To front paste-down, 19th-century bookplate of The Hope Trust, 31 Moray Place, Edinburgh, with a pencil note signed by Martin Jones: 'July 1987 - from Boris Guzzman'; small, round inkstamp with the initials R.L. II. Small round paper label (toned) to spine with 'G.70' written in. First published in Italian in 1668 as Il Cardinalissimo di Santa Chiesa. Gregorio Leti (16301701) was a historian and satirist originally from Milan, now most remembered for his works about the Catholic Church and especially the papacy; everything he published went onto the Index Librorum Prohibitorum. Leti is unsurprisingly described in The Catholic Encyclopedia as "mendacious and inexact", but religious and secular writers alike question his accuracy. In 1680 Leti joined the court of Charles II and was commissioned to write a history of England. The Earl of Anglesey gave Leti access to his library, as did Bishop Gilbert Burnet. Among his publications during his time in England was the first proper, though heavily embellished, attempt at a Life of Elizabeth I. In 1683 his Il Teatro Britannico offended the King, and he fled to Amsterdam.   Ref: 52061 
£350
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Libanius: (Wolfius, J.C., ed.:) Epistolae. Quas nunc primum maximam partem e variis codicibus, manu exaratis, edidit, Latine convertit & notis illustravit. Amstelaedami [Amsterdam]: Apud Janssonio-Waesbergios. 1738. Editio princeps. Folio, pp. [xx] 865 [i] + school prize leaf. Title page in red and black, engraved device. Sporadic foxing, some dustiness to upper margins. Contemporary vellum, faded ink title to spine, spine and boards tooled in gilt, armorial Amsterdam gilt centrepiece to both boards, edges sprinnkled red. Darkened and a bit soiled, some gilt rubbed, scuffed at edges, small red ink blot to lower board, ties lost. Printed school prize leaf with engraved vignettte, inscribed to Jano Lissone 16th April 1786. The first collected printing of the letters of Libanius, the fourth-century AD rhetorician. More than 1500 of his letters survive, the largest extant collection from antiquity, and only brief selections had been previously edited. Wolf's magisterial volume not only prints as many as were known but also includes Latin translations for each letter; Smith called it 'the best edition' (Dict. Gr. & Rom. Bio.), and it is still cited in modern editions. Brunet III, 1050; Graesse IV, 195; Hoffman II; Spoelder, 493 (Amst. 12).   Ref: 46584  show full image..
£900
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Limborch, Philippus van: Theologia Christiana Ad praxin pietatis ac promotionem pacis Christianae unice directa. Editio altera. Amstelaedami [Amsterdam]: Apud Henricum Wetstenium, 1695. Folio, pp. [xvi] 852 [xxiv] (incl. frontispiece). Worming in lower margin throughout, starting as trails and narrowing to a single hole until the index where it expands slightly again, one additional trail occasionally touching characters in last line of text across five gatherings (4S-4Y), a bit of light dampmarking and dustsoiling, a few small stains. Contemporary dark panelled sprinkled calf, rebacked preserving the original spine, new red morocco lettering piece, corners renewed, new endpapers, old leather a bit scratched. The second edition of the Dutch theologian Phillip van Limborch's most important work, a system of Christian theology based on Simon Episcopius and Stephan Curcellaeus. It stands as the first and most complete exposition of Arminianism, and was translated into English in 1702. Limborch's other claim to fame was his close epistolary friendship with John Locke.   Ref: 34352  show full image..
£400
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[Livy] Livius Patavinus, Titus: (Drakenborch, Arnold, ed.:) Historiarum ab urbe condita. Libri qui supersunt omnes ex recensione Arn. Drakenborch. Accedunt supplementa deperditorum T. Livii Librorum A. Joh. Freinshemio Concinnata. Cum notis selectoribus. Venetiis [Venice]: apud Thomam Bettinelli, 1791-94. 14 vols., 8vo., pp. xliii [i] 545 [i]; 428; 308; 464; 461 [i]; 387 [i]; 448; 416; 434; 462; 475 [i]; 547 [i]; 599 [i]; viii 507 [i] + engraved titles in each vol. and frontispiece portrait in Vol. 1. Occasional foxing and dustsoiling, but generally bright and clean, page edges untrimmed and frequently unopened, some marginal pencil notes, Vol. 4 with ink portraits to rear endpapers. Contemporary quarter vellum with marbled paper boards, red morocco gilt labels to smooth spines, vellum stained in places, cornertips a touch worn, a few joints rubbed. Small contemporary ownership inscription to foot of titles. Like most editions of Livy in the second half of the eighteenth century, the text here is based on Drakenborch's edition, which was published in seven volumes in the 1740s. This edition stretches to fourteen volumes in the smaller octavo format, and while this copy shows some signs of use (including marginal notes), the owner appears to have only read small selections since outside of Vol. 4 most of the pages remain unopened.   Ref: 32946 
£350
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[London] To the Right Honourable the Lords and Commons Assembled in Parliament, the humble Petition of the Lord Major, Aldermen, and Commons of the City of London in Common-Councell Assembled. As it was presented by the Sheriffes, Common-Councell, and other Citizens of the City of London, May the 9th 1648. With the Parliaments Answer thereunto, and Votes upon the same. Likewise the Petition of the Grand Jury at the Assizes holden at Chelms London: Imprimatur Gilbert Mabbot; Printed for Joseph Hunscot, 1648. 4to., pp. [ii], 6. Woodcut headpiece to p.1. Some underlining and symbols in an old hand. 19th-century brown pigskin, green morocco gilt label to spine, armorial gilt centrepiece, gilt borders and dentelles, a.e.g.,marbled endpapers, ribbon bookmark bound in, textblock made more substantial by numerous binder's blanks at rear. Very minor rubbing to endcaps, free endpapers a little toned at edges. A very good, handsomely bound copy. Very large armorial bookplate of Fairfax of Cameron to front paste-down (descendants of parliamentarian army officer Thomas, third Lord Fairfax of Cameron (16121671)). Tiny stamp to ffep verso, 'Bound by Mudie'. Pamphlet concerning the London militia and the garrisoning of the Tower. The Parliament's replies to the Common Council are dated 9 May 1648, those to the grand jury 4 May 1648. ESTC R203823   Ref: 52380 
£175
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Longinus, Dionysius: (Pearce, Zachary, ed.:) [Greek letters: Dionysiou Logginou Peri Hypsous Hypomnema] De Sublimitate Commentarius, Quem Nova Versione Donavit, [...] Londini [London]: ex officina Jacobi Tonson, & Johannis Watts, 1724. First edition thus. 4to., pp. [viii], xv, [i], 187, [i], 28, [xvi] + engraved frontispiece. Bound without an initial advertising leaf as listed in some copies. Parallel Greek and Latin texts. Engraved intials and head- and tail-pieces, with final errata leaf. Occasional light pencil annotations. A little sporadic offsetting, mostly to Index. Contemporary sheep, rebacked retaining original spine but now failing at upper joint, edges sprinkled red, endpapers renewed. Very rubbed, joints worn with the upper beginning to split, corners worn. A tired binding but internally very good indeed. To the ffep, a very large, recent presentation bookplate to Desmond Costa. To the title-page verso, a small, older bookplate reading 'Ex bibliotheca hospitii dominorum advocatorum de arcubus Londini'. To the rfep, a pen inscription reading: 'Dublin - Hodges Figgis and Son [bookshop]./ Dawson St./ September 1964. Richard Carden'. First edition of Pearce's popular edition of Longinus, which was still in print in the nineteenth century. De Sublimitate is a work of literary criticism in Roman-era Greek, dated to the 1st century AD. The unknown author is conventionally referred to as 'Longinus' or 'Pseudo-Longinus', but their true identity has long been debated. A 10th century manuscript, the oldest surviving, names the original author as 'Dionysius or Longinus', which was later misread as 'Dionysius Longinus'. Later analyses have attributed the work to Dionysius of Halicarnassus or Cassius Longinus, though now neither is widely accepted. This quarto first edition is described as 'elegant' by Dibdin. Pearce presents, he says, 'the true text of his author, a new Latin version, and some elegant and erudite notes.' Later octavo editions were produced 'for the sake of general circulation, and they have propagated universally the critical talents and fine taste of their editor.' ESTC T87474; Dibdin II (4th edn.) 177-8   Ref: 51766 
£200
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Longinus, Dionysius: (Pearce, Zachary, ed.:) [Greek letters] De Sublimitate Commentarius, quem qova versione donavit, Perpetuis Notis illustravit, & partim Manuscriptorum ope, partim conjectura, emendavit (additis etiam omnibus ejusdem Auctoris Fragmentis). Dublini: apud J. Smith & G. Bruce, 1733. Third edition. 8vo., pp. xliv, 372, including engraved frontispiece. Title-page in red and black, woodcut initials and tail-pieces, large engraved head-piece to p.v. A few annotations in an old hand, e.g. p.15. A very light marginal dampstain to lower fore-edge corner from frontis to approx. p.xxxv but generally clean within. Contemporary dark brown calf, gilt spine label, gilt thistle and shelf mark at tail of spine, edges lightly sprinkled red. Headcap neatly repaired, upper joint a little worn but holding firm, upper fore-edge corner bumped with slight creasing. A few small paper repairs to ffep where it was previously stuck to the bookplate. A very good copy. Engraved armorial bookplate of the Charles Perceval (17561840), 2nd Baron Arden in the Irish peerage and 1st Baron Arden in the peerage of the UK. Perceval was the older brother of the Prime Minister Spencer Perceval (17621812) as well as being a prominent politician himself. He was also a fellow of the Royal Society and the Society of Antiquaries, and a trustee of the Hunterian Museum. Published in the same year in both Dublin and Edinburgh, this Dublin edition appears to be the rarer, COPAC finding only the ESTC listing plus copies at Trinity College Dublin and Glasgow University. The sheets of this edition were in fact printed in the Netherlands and are a separate issue or variant imprint of the 1733 Amsterdam edition of R. & J. Wetstein and G. Smith. Dibdin recommends Pearce's edition (first published in 1724 in London in 4to. format) as 'the true text', praising its 'elegant and erudite notes' and adding that the subsequent 8vo. editions contain 'advantageous corrections and additions'. He records the second London edition of 1732 (the first 8vo.) and Foulis' 'very elegant' 4to. of 1763, but omits this Irish issue. ESTC N28412; Dibdin (4th edn.) II 177-8   Ref: 51610 
£225
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Lucian of Samasota: (Mayne, Jasper, trans.:) Part of Lucian Made English from the Originall. In the Yeare 1638. Oxford: R. Davies, 1664. FIRST PART ONLY. 1st edition 2nd issue, folio, pp. [xvi], 398, [iv] + portrait frontispiece of Lucian signed: W: Faithhorne sculpsit.. As usual pp.162-167 and pp.316-317 are misnumbered as 182-187 and 306, 311 respectively. Woodcut device to title-page, woodcut initials and head- and tail-pieces. Some old repairs to frontis at gutter, to title-page verso (particularly head and tail edges) plus a few other places e.g. head of first dedicatory leaf, M1, Z1, and some other smaller repairs; small worm trail to bottom corner of fore-edge margin roughly pp.202-281, repaired in some places; light browning and possible dampstaining to head and tail edges near front and rear; occasional wax spots and tiny scorch holes, final blank leaf laid down.. Contemporary speckled calf boards neatly rebacked in polished sheep, raised bands and morocco gilt label to spine, blind-tooled borders, edges sprinkled red, endpapers replaced. Endcaps, raised bands and joints rubbed, a little chipping to edges, corners worn, a few light scuffs and scrapes. A good copy, soundly repaired. To the front paste-down: small book label of Charles Whibley. To frontispiece verso: various pen trials and doodled faces, plus inscriptions of Thos. Hartopp and Elizabeth Mallory 'Her Booke, 1694'. To title-page recto: two more inscriptions of Tho. Hartopp, and one of Ralph Welles. To final blank: another inscription of Elizabeth Mallory dated 1694 and another (seemingly in the same handwriting) of Elizabeth Welles; in the same hand a quotation, 'One moment gives Invention to Destroy / What to Rebuild would A whole Age Imploy'. This comes from William Congreve's play The Double-Dealer, which was first produced at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane in November or December of 1693 and first appeared in print the following year. There are also what appear to be faded signatures on the leather of the lower board, though these are illegible. This version, with its title-page dated 1664, seems to be a reissue of the original 1663 first (the title-page of the first issue is dated 1663 and there is no portrait). The second part of the work is not found here; titled "Certain select dialogues of Lucian: together with his true history, translated from the Greek into English. By Mr. Francis Hickes", it has separate pagination, register, and title page with the imprint "printed for Richard Davis,... 1663". It appears that it was also issued separately (Wing L3425). ESTC R23081; Wing L3435   Ref: 52318 
£450
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Lucian of Samosata: (Benedictus, J., ed.:) [...] Opera Omnia in Duos Tomos Divisa. Salmurii [Saumur], Ex Typis Pietri Piededii, 1619. First edition thus. 2 vols., 8vo., pp. [xx] 1078 (recte 1122) [xxxiv]; [viii] 1114 [xlviii]. A few closed marginal tears, early leaves a little brittle at edges, occasional minor staining. Contemporary vellum, ink titles to spines, Yapp sides, edges spinkled red. A little soiled particularly at spines, endcaps creased, some smudges and candle wax spots. A few handwritten notes to preliminary blanks. The works of the 2nd century Greek "belletrist and wit" (OCD) Lucian of Samosata. The text stands out from previous printings for being newly improved with conjectures and manuscript collations; Schweiger thought the result "quite correct", although Dibdin, perhaps idiosyncratically, held the opposite view. Dibdin (4th edn.) II 192-193. Schweiger I 193.   Ref: 46578  show full image..
£450
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