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[Lucian of Samosata] Lucianus: (Hemsterhuis, Tiberius; Gesner, Johann Matthias; Reitz, Johan Frederik; Reitz, Conrad, eds.:) [...] Luciani Samosatensis Opera. [...] Cum Nova Versione Tiber. Hemsterhusii, & Io. Matthiae Gesneri [...] Cuius priorem partem summo studio curavit & illustravit Tiberius Hemsterhusius. [...] notasque suas adiecit Ioannes Fredericus Reitzius. Amstelodami [Amsterdam]: Sumptibus Jacobi Wetstenii; trajecti ad Rhenum (Utrecht): ex typographia He 1743; 1743; 1743; 1746. 4 vols. (3 vols. Opera + later Index vol.), 4to., pp. [x], LXXII, 882 + 1 plate; [iv], 953, [i]; [iv], 860; [viii], XVI, 500, [iv]. Index volume lacks gathering 4D, and has the 'Index Criticus' bound before the main text (rather than its usual place at the rear). Half-titles to vols. I-III, title-pages in red and black with engraved printer's devices except vol.IV which has a woodcut decoration. Woodcut initials, engraved head- and tail-pieces, occasional illustrations in the text. Parallel columns of Greek text and Latin translation, Latin footnotes. Some light foxing mostly restricted to front and rear, occasional dustiness to some head margins and final leaves, a little toning to Index vol. around text, to vol.III a slight separation between gatherings A and B. Contemporary vellum, titles inked to spines, raised bands, boards blindstamped, edges heavily sprinkled red. Light smudgy marks and a few small stains, lower corner of vol. III's upper board curved inwards a little but a very good, attractive set. Bound uniformly with our stock number 51574, Burmann's Virgil (1746). To front paste-down of each volume: armorial bookplate of the mathematician Miles Bland (1786–1867); book plate of T.A. Bury. The famous three-volume edition of Lucian by the eminent 18th-century classicist Tiberius Hemsterhuis (1685-1766), together with a fourth volume of indices produced three years later by Conrad Reitz. In 1824 Jacob Geel published a further 66-page volume of Hemsterhusius' annotations which had been supposed to have been burnt, but had in fact been preserved in Leiden public library. 'This is not only the most beautiful, but the most accurate and complete edition of Lucian that has ever been published: the editors were Hemsterhusius, J.M. Gesner, and Reitzius. The greater part of the first volume was particularly the production of Hemsterhusius, and it contains a rich find of the most curious and profound criticism relating to Lucian; the second and third volumes were completed chiefly by J. Reitzius; the fourth volume [...] was compiled by Conrad Reitzius, the brother: Gesner had the care of the Latin version, which is a very excellent one, and accompanied with useful notes. The high character which this edition has long borne in the classical world, makes it unnecessary to give minute description of its contents [...]' (Dibdin). 'Édition la plus estimée de cet auteur' (Brunet). Dibdin (4th edn.) II 193   Ref: 51573 
£800
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Lucretius Carus, Titus: De Rerum Natura Libri Sex. Birminghamae [Birmingham]: Johannis Baskerville, 1772. First Baskerville edition. 4to., pp. [ii], 280. Occasional very light spots and smudges but generally bright, gatherings T-Z clean and not foxed as is sometimes the case. Slightly later red straight grain morocco, raised bands, gilt rules and title to spine, plain gilt borders and dentelles, a.e.g., marbled leather-jointed endpapers, green ribbon bookmark bound in. Spine a little darkened, a few tiny scrapes, white dusty marks to board edges at fore-edge. A very good, handsome copy. Tiny, illegible inscription at foot of first page of text, possibly dated 1785, the bottom edge of the letters just shaved off. The first Baskerville edition of Lucretius (a duodecimo followed the next year). In a somewhat backhanded fashion, Dibdin comments that this edition is remarkable for its typographical beauty though nothing else. ESTC T50365; Dibdin II (4th edn.), 203; Gaskell 43; Gordon 20; Schweiger II, 577   Ref: 52288 
£600
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Lydius, Jacobus: (Van Til, Saloman, ed.:) Syntagma Sacrum De Re Militari: Nec Non De Jure Jurando Dissertation Philologica. Opus postumumu, & multa eruditione commendatum cum figuris æneis elegantissime incisis, quod nunc primum ex tenebris eruit, notisque illustravit. Salomon van Til. Dordraci [Dordrecht]: apud Cornelium Willegardum Bibliopolam; 'apud Nicolaum Vries' to rear, 1698. First edition. 4to., pp. [xxviii], 338, 56, [xxviii] + 12 plates, 4 of which folding. Additional engraved title-page, woodcut device to title-page and further woodcut head- and tail-pieces and initials, generous margins. A couple of small, closed marginal tears; paper flaw to bottom edge of pp.89-90, not affecting text. Very occasional spots, a few small stains to engraved title, some light marginal smudges but generally clean and bright within. 19th-century marbled paper-covered boards with tan calf corners, recently rebacked in tan speckled calf with raised bands and red morocco gilt label, edges very lightly sprinkled red. Boards a bit rubbed, corners worn, but a very good, sound copy. Oxford University bookplate to front paste-down, with 'Rejected 1925' overwritten in pencil. First edition of Lydius's (1610-79) posthumously published work on ancient military science. Brunet 29046   Ref: 50149 
£450
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Lysias: (Taylor, John, ed.:) Orationes et Fragmenta. Graece et Latine. Ad fidem Codd. Manuscriptorem recensuit, [...] Londini [London]: Ex Officina Gulielmi Bowyer, 1739. 2 vols. in 1, 4to., pp. [viii], xc, 528, [ii], 431-722, [xxvi] (with errors in pagination as usual). Greek and Latin. Leaf Fff4 (ie. pp.415-6) in this copy is the cancelland, showing the original number '39' in the first line of text. A few large, engraved head-pieces, occasional woodcut decorations. Two preliminary blanks a little loose at tail edge, first few leaves slightly creased. Contemporary vellum, raised bands and inked title to spine, all edges coloured red, marbled endpapers. Upper board a bit bowed, a little grubby. A very good, large paper copy. 19th-century armorial bookplate of Sir John Trollope to front paste-down. One of only 100 copies printed on large paper. According to Bowyer's records, 300 copies were printed on Genoa demy, 75 on royal, and 25 on writing royal. "Beautifully and correctly printed by the celebrated Bowyer. This is an incomparable edition, and hardly exceeded by any which this country can boast of" (Dibdin). ESTC T106443; Schweiger I 202; Dibdin (4th edn.) II 213; Brunet III 1257; Graesse IV 314.   Ref: 51885 
£950
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Mandeville, John: The Voiage and Travaile of Sir John Maundevile, Kt.. Which treateth of the Way to Hierusalem; and of Marvayles of Inde, with other Ilands and Countryes. Now publish'd entire from an Original MS. in the Cotton Library. London: printed for Woodman and Lyon in Russel-Street Covent-Garden, and C. Davis, in Hatton-Garden, 1727. 8vo., pp. xvi, 384, [xvi]. Contents bound at rear with Index, rather than as usual after the Editor's Preface. Title-page in red and black, woodcut head- & tail-pieces and initials. Occasional foxing, a few ink spots and smudges, first and final leaves a little dusty. Contemporary Cambridge-style panelled calf, recently rebacked with older red morocco gilt spine label retained, board edges and corners repaired, endpapers replaced with armorial bookplate slightly visible beneath front paste-down. A little rubbed but a very good, soundly repaired copy. Ownership inscription of Wm. Leaker of Liverpool at head of Editor's Preface (A2). First appearing in France c.1357 as Voyages de Jehan de Mandeville Chevalier, the name of this work's true author remains unknown. It tells the story of the narrator's supposed world travels and was enormously popular: there were further French versions, as well as translations into German, English, Italian, Dutch, Spanish, Irish, Danish, and Czech. 'Altogether over 250 manuscripts survive in twenty-two versions. In England alone there were four Latin and four English translations and a rhymed version.' (ODNB) 'Sir John Mandeville' claims to be an English knight, born in St Albans, who departed on his travels in 1322. However, there is no historical evidence for his adventures, and it appears that at least 90% of the narrative of the Voyages can be traced back to preexisting written sources. So who was the real author? Examination of the original French text is revealing. M.C. Seymour posits 'that the author had no knowledge of St Albans but was a fluent French-speaker; that he composed his work c.1357 in a large, almost certainly ecclesiastical, library; that he was an ecclesiastic, with a cleric's knowledge of the Bible, and probably a member of a regular order; that he was a fluent reader of Latin but lacked any knowledge of Greek or Arabic; that he was an informed and intelligent reader of books describing the Holy Land and other foreign parts; that he had mastered the theories of Sacrobosco and his commentators, possibly at the University of Paris, on the rotundity of the world and was aware of the possibility of circumnavigation; that he had never travelled to the lands he describes; that he was aware of current French accounts of foreign lands and was in a position to launch his own work into the mainstream of the Parisian book-trade.' (ODNB) This anaylsis presents Jean le Long (d.1388) as a likely candidate. As librarian of the Benedictine abbey church of St Bertin at St Omer (in France but then under English rule and on the main route between Calais and Paris) he would have had access to genuine travellers and pilgrims visiting the Mediterranean and the Near East who would have used the route and stayed at the abbey. '[The abbey's] library contained all the works used by Mandeville in the compilation of the Voyages, including the comparatively scarce French translation of the Directorium ad faciendum passagium transmarinum made by the hospitaller Jean de Vignay (c.1340).' (ODNB) ESTC T100821   Ref: 51726 
£650
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[Martial] Martialis, Marcus Valerius: (Farnaby, Thomas, ed.:) Epigrammata. Amsterdami: apud Joannem Jonssonium, 1645. 12mo., pp. [xii], 456. Woodcut device to title-page. Slightly foxed throughout, occasional light spots and smudges. Slightly later vellum, gilt title within border to spine, all edges coloured red. Vellum a litlte greyed with a few smudgy marks, some pencilled numbers to front endpapers. A good, sound copy. Thomas Farnaby (1574/5–1647) was a celebrated schoolteacher and grammarian. 'The success of his establishment allowed Farnaby to devote himself to a long-held obsession: the systemization of the grammatical principles of classical Latin and Greek in print. Commencing with the satires of Juvenal and Persius (1612), he annotated many of the classical authors—Seneca, Martial, Lucan, Ovid, Virgil, and Terence—in a manner intended to render their works intelligible to schoolboys [...] He also corresponded with the Dutch intellectuals Gerardus Johannes Vossius and Daniel Heinsius, both of whom acknowledged their own debts to his learning.' (ODNB) His edition of Martial first appeared in London in 1615.   Ref: 51881 
£125
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[Martial] Martialis, Marcus Valerius: (Farnaby, Thomas, ed.:) Epigrammata. Amsterdami: apud Iohannem Blaeu, 1644. 12mo., pp. 492, including engraved title-page. Latin text and apparatus. Woodcut initials and head- & tail-pieces. Ink smudges and a bit of light offsetting to blank area of p.5 and to text of p.20 where it affects a few words, trimmed closely at fore-edge but only occasionally brushing a letter or two, occasional light spots and smudges. Early 19th-century dark brown morocco, gilt spine, borders and dentelles, a.e.g., marbled endpapers. Joints worn with the upper just starting at each end, small loss to headcap, spine a bit faded. A very good copy in a handsome binding. Inked in an old hand to ffep verso 'Relie par Bozerian Aîné' and in pencil to rear free endpaper recto 'Bound by the famous Bozerian', though not otherwise signed. This refers to Jean-Claude Bozerian (1762-1840), elder of the two Bozerian brothers who were esteemed Parisian bookbinders producing both ordinary and luxury bindings. Jean-Claude practised from 1795 until about 1810, when his nephew P. Lefébure took over the studio. Thomas Farnaby (1574/5–1647) was a celebrated schoolteacher and grammarian. 'The success of his establishment allowed Farnaby to devote himself to a long-held obsession: the systemization of the grammatical principles of classical Latin and Greek in print. Commencing with the satires of Juvenal and Persius (1612), he annotated many of the classical authors—Seneca, Martial, Lucan, Ovid, Virgil, and Terence—in a manner intended to render their works intelligible to schoolboys [...] He also corresponded with the Dutch intellectuals Gerardus Johannes Vossius and Daniel Heinsius, both of whom acknowledged their own debts to his learning.' (ODNB) His edition of Martial first appeared in London in 1615. Schweiger III, 598   Ref: 52208 
£180
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Mayr, Georgius: Institutiones Linguae Hebraicae in sex partes distributae. Lugduni [Lyon]: Sumptibus Antonii Iullieron. 1649. 8vo., pp. [viii] 463 [i]. Printed in Hebrew and Roman characters. Some browning and spotting. Contemporary calf, spine in six compartments with raised bands, rebacked preserving original gilt-decorated compartments and red morocco label, now somewhat darkened, boards flaked but since polished, corners renewed. Old ownership inscription to title of 'J. Thompson'(?). The major work of the Jesuit linguist Georg Mayr, a successful grammar of the Hebrew language for use by Christian hebraists. It followed the popular grammar of the same title by Robert Bellarmine (1578 et seq.), Mayr's teacher, and Mayr explains that Jesuit duties had prevented Bellarmine from achieving what he might have. Clearly there was a demand for new and improved Hebrew grammars, since Mayr's work, first published in 1616, was reprinted in 1622 and again in this edition of 1649.   Ref: 28113  show full image..
£375
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Meibom, Johann Heinrich: Maecenas, sive de C. Cilnii Maecenatis vita, moribus & rebus gestis: liber singularis. Accessit C. Pedonis Albinovani Maecenati scriptum epicedium, notis illustratum. Lugduni Batavorum [Leiden]: apud Johannem & Danielem Elsevier, 1653. Small 4to. (193 x 155mm), pp. [xii], 186, [viii], 11, [ix], including errata leaf usually lacking. Engraved portrait vignette to title-page, woodcut initials and head-pieces, small numismatic illustration in text. Sporadic light foxing a little heavier to a few leaves. Very neat modern binding, tan quarter calf, raised bands and red morocco gilt title label to spine, marbled boards, edges sprinkled red, endpapers renewed. Very slight shelf wear, a very good copy. An account of the early life of Gaius Cilnius Maecenas (68 BC–8 BC) the famous patron of letters (notably to the new generation of Augustan poets, including both Horace and Virgil), by the German physician and humanist Johann Heinrich Meibom (1590-1655). This copy includes the final errata leaf which, as Willems notes, appears to have been added afterwards and is missing in most examples. Schweiger II, 588; Willems 731   Ref: 52319 
£350
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Melvil, James: (Scott, George, ed.:) The Memoires of Sir James Melvil of Hal-hill: Containing an impartial account of the most remarkable Affairs of State during the Sixteenth Century, not mentioned by other Historians; [...] Now published from the original Manuscript, by George Scott, Gent. London: printed by E.H. for Robert Boulter, 1683. Folio, pp. [xvi], 204, [xxviii]. A little worming almost all of which is marginal but which just occasionally touches the text, occasional faint marks. Contemporary very dark brown mottled calf rebacked in lighter calf, gilt spine with label, top corners repaired., edges sprinkled red. Rubbed, joints creased with split just starting to tail of upper, small hole to first compartment, some surface loss to boards. Three labels pasted to front paste-down: the first a large plain T; the second an ornate V surmounted by a crown; the third the armorial bookplate of Gilmour of Lundin and Montrave. Another armorial bookplate, of Sir Wlliam Gordon of Inver-Gordon, to title-page verso. ESTC notes 'at least' two states, this being the first listed in which p. 26 & 31 are numbered correctly and p. 65 & 128 are misnumbered 67 & 118 respectively. Melvil's (1535-1617) grandson George Scott based this work on Melvils' Memoirs of my own Life, a manuscript of which was discovered at Edinburgh Castle in 1660. Some historians doubt the authenticity of Scott's edition, citing errors in editing and the suppression of some of the English government's more sinister dealings prior to Mary's condemnation. ESTC R201   Ref: 51141 
£300
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