Antiquarian Booksellers Association
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Spelman, Henry: Glossarium Archaiologicum: Continens Latino-Barbara, Peregrina, Obsoleta, & Novatæ Significationis Vocabula; Quæ post labefactatas a Gothis, Vandalisque res Europæas, in ecclesiasticis, profanisque scriptoribus; variarum item gentium legibus antiquis municipalibus, chartis, & Londini: excudebat Tho. Braddyll, & prostant apud Georg. Pawlett, & Guil. Freeman [...] 1687. Third edition. Folio, pp. [xxii], 576 + engraved portrait frontispiece. Title-page in red and black, woodcut initials, head- and tail-pieces, double-column text. Dampstain to gutter from preliminary blanks to first leaf of text, occasional light patchy toning, a few faint ink blots. Later 18th-century brown, lightly diced calf recently rebacked in goatskin with raised bands, black and gilt morocco title label. Gilt borders and armorial centrepiece to each board, all edges coloured yellow, marbled endpapers reinforced with cloth at hinges. Spine very slightly rubbed at head and tail, board edges worn and chipped, a little light crackling to surface, corners frayed. A very good copy, with interesting provenance. Armorial bookplate of Rugby School to ffep. Armorial gilt stamps to boards and bookplate to front paste-down, all of Sir Simon Richard Brissett Taylor, 2nd Baronet of Lysson Hall, Jamaica (1783-1815). He was nephew and heir to Simon Taylor (1740-1813), planter and slave owner who was at the time of his death one of the richest and most powerful men in Jamaica. Uncle and nephew were very close; an enormous amount of correspondence between the two still exists and is now housed at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies (University of London). Simon R.B. Taylor's library was eventually auctioned by R.H. Evans on 3rd June 1833. This setting of the title-page has 'auctior' in the edition statement and the second line of imprint ends 'Free-'. Another setting has 'auctor', and the second line of the imprint ends 'Freeman;'. Sir Henry Spelman (1563/41641), celebrated historian and antiquary, published the first part of this work (covering the letters A-L) in 1626 as Archaeologus. He had moved to London in 1612 and found himself part of an encouraging community of fellow scholars such as John Selden and in particular Sir Robert Cotton, whose extensive library he was allowed to use. Spelman's work required him to make sense of the meaning and usage of historic terminology used by the church and in common law, particularly Latin and Anglo-Saxon terms. It was this need that prompted him to begin work on what was to eventually become Archaeologus. Publication of the work, for which Spelman bore the full cost, was encouraged by a number of scholars including Peiresc, to whom Spelman sent samples prior to its release. The finished glossary 'encompassed the study of the usages, offices, ranks, ceremonies, and rules in the medieval church and law in the context of the words used in Europe' (ODNB). A great deal of Spelman's work remained incomplete or unpublished at the time of his death in 1641. William Dugdale (16051686), who had met Spelman in 1638, completed and saw to the publication of the remainder of the glossary, which first appeared as Glossarium Archaiologicum in 1664. ESTC R10264; Wing S4926   Ref: 51877 
£500
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Spencer, Nathaniel, pseud. [Sanders, Robert]: The Complete English Traveller; or, a new survey and description of England and Wales. Containing A full Account of whatever is Curious and Entertaining In The Several Counties of England and Wales, The Isles of Man, Jersey, Guernsey, And other Islands adjoining to, and dependant o London: printed for J. Cooke, 1771. First edition. Folio, pp. iv, [iv], 696, [xii] + engraved frontispiece, 3 folding engraved maps, 57 engraved copper plates. 11cm closed tear to the largest map, fortunately only affecting the 'Northern Ocean' and stopping at the coast. Final 4 leaves repaired, the last 2 extensively, though the text remains legible. Occasional spots and smudges, some pale ink blots, a little light dampstaining to top corner of first few leaves. Contemporary calf, rebacked, red gilt morocco spine label. Endcaps very worn, upper joint splitting, rubbed, corners wearing, endpapers renewed. Earlier repairs beginning to deteriorate, but still a good, sound copy. Large armorial bookplate of Major Philip E. Back to front paste-down. 'Sanders (c.17271783), a writer and compiler of biographies, actually began his career as an apprentice comb maker. His passion for reading consumed his free time, and coupled with an extraordinary memory meant that he could spend his nights studying Latin, Greek, Hebrew, mathematics, and history. He moved to London in about 1760 and made his living there as a hack writer. After about four years in the capital he began compiling criminal biographies; these were first published in numbers, and then as The Newgate Journal, or, Malefactor's Bloody Register (5 vols., 1773). He was employed by George Lyttelton, first Baron Lyttelton in 1769 to correct for the press the third edition of his History of the Life of King Henry II. Sanders published The Complete English Traveller under the pseudonym 'Nathaniel Spencer', issuing it in 60 weekly numbers. A hefty travel guide, it was based partly on his own experience but was also informed by the travel writings of John Ray, Daniel Defoe and John Pennant. 'Sanders, who had a wife and five children to support, was always impoverished; he was described by the bookseller Henry Lemoine as 'one of the sons of misfortune, who, with a share of learning that might have entitled a less voluminous writer to a name among the literati, never emerged from obscurity' (GM, 311).' (ODNB) ESTC T124249   Ref: 50828 
£650
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Stanley, Arthur Penrhyn: Historical Memorials of Canterbury. The Landing of Augustine; The Murder of Becket; Edward the Black Prince; Becket's Shrine. Philadelphia: George W. Jacobs & Co., 1899. 2nd US edition, from the 11th UK edition. 8vo., pp.xviii, 19-362 + plates. Further illustrations in the text. Red cloth, heavily gilt stamped, top edge gilt, other edges uncut and some unopened. Spine a little toned with endcaps a bit creased, upper hinge weakening slightly but holding firm, very good. Pencil inscription of Gilpin Ervin to ffep. Arthur Penrhyn Stanley (18151881) was Dean of Westminster from 1864 to 1881.   Ref: 51865 
£20
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Stanley, Arthur Penrhyn: Historical Memorials of Westminster Abbey. Philadelphia: George W. Jacobs & Co., 1899. US edition, based on the 6th UK edition. 2 vols., 8vo., pp. xlii, [ii], 335, [i]; x, [ii], 422 + plates. Further illustrations in the text. Red cloth, heavily gilt stamped, top edge gilt, other edges uncut and some unopened. Spine a little toned with endcaps a bit creased, slight split in endpaper at upper hinge but binding sound, very good. Pencilled inscription of Spencer Ervin Jr. to ffep. Arthur Penrhyn Stanley (18151881) was Dean of Westminster from 1864 to 1881.   Ref: 51866 
£30
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Stevenson, Francis Seymour: Robert Grosseteste, Bishop of Lincoln. A Contribution to the Religious, Political and Intellectual History of the Thirteenth Century. London: Macmillan and Co., 1899. 8vo., pp. xvi, 348. Black cloth, gilt; generally dusty, boards worn and spine slightly faded. Binding firm, internally clean. Ownership inscription to f.f.e.p.   Ref: 42199 
£30
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(Stevenson, Joseph ed.:) Chronicon Monasterii de Abingdon. I, From the Foundation of the Monastery Until the Norman Conquest; From the Norman Conquest Until the Accession of Richard the First. London: Longman, Brown, Green, Longmans, and Roberts, 1858. 2 vols., pp. 4, xxxii, [ii], 494; 4, cxi, [i], 615, [i], 3, [i] + folding frontispiece to each volume. Three-page publisher's catalogue dated November 1858. Generally unopened at head edge, several fore-edges also unopened, series title-pages a little foxed. Black paper-covered boards backed in textured burgundy cloth, gilt title to spines. Headcaps worn, top edges dusty, a little shelf wear, endpapers heavily toned but still very good overall. To front paste-down both vols., 'Ex Libris Monasterii St. Augustini, Ramsgate' bookplate and library card holder. Rerum Britannicarum Medii Aevi Scriptores, or Chronicles and Memorials of Great Britain and Ireland During the Middle Ages series.   Ref: 52169 
£50
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Stevenson, W.H. (ed.): Records of the Borough of Nottingham. Being a Series of Extracts from the Archives of the Corporation of Nottingham. Vol. III: King Henry VII to King Henry VIII, 1485-1547. London: Bernard Quaritch, 1885. First edition. 4to., pp. xix, 538 + 2 fold-out facsimiles. Quarter roan, spine worn with loss to endcaps. Dusting to top-edge.   Ref: 45698 
£25
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Strachey, Oliver; Strachey, Ray: Keigwin's Rebellion. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1916. 8vo., pp. xv, 184. Complete with frontis, 2 plates and 2 maps to text. Red cloth, endcaps a little creased but still very good. Dust-jacket spine sunned, slight wear to extremities. Oxford Historical and Literary Studies Vol. 6.   Ref: 51987 
£35
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Strutt, Joseph: (Hone, William, ed.:) The Sports and Pastimes of the People of England; Including the Rural and Domestic Recreations, May Games, Mummeries, Shows, Processions, Pageants, and Pompous Spectacles, from the Earliest Period to the Present Time. London: Printed for Thomas Tegg and Son, 1834. New edition with index. 8vo., pp.lxvii, [i], 420. Many illustrations in the text. Very faintly toned, occasional small smudges, title-page and endpapers a little dusty. Publisher's boards, backed in green cloth with printed paper label, edges uncut. Cocked, spine much faded, small loss to top left corner of label, a few marks, edges worn. A good sound copy in an interesting, unsophisticated binding. This 'New' edition is the third, the first edition having appeared in 1801 and the second (in fact just an incorrect reprint, according to Hone's preface) in 1810, the year of Strutt's death.   Ref: 51268 
£60
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Stukeley, William: An Account of Richard of Cirencester, Monk of Westminster, and of his Works: with his Antient Map of Roman Brittain; and the Itinerary thereof. Read at the Antiquarian Society, March 18, 1756. London: printed by Richard Hett: and sold by Charles Corbet, 1757. First edition. 4to, pp. 94, [ii] + folding map, + blank leaf to front and rear. A few woodcut initials and decorations, facsimile of part of an original MS to final leaf. Blank leaves foxed and a little tattered at edges, first and final few leaves toned at edges (seemingly acid transfer from a previous leather binding); map a little creased at head and tail edges, with 75mm closed tear along one fold and short closed tears at each end of gutter attachment. Recently rebound in dark green library buckram backed with dark green textured sheep, gilt title to spine, new endpapers with cloth-reinforced hinges. A very good copy in an incongruent but very practical binding. Library code in red ink to title-page. To title-page verso, armorial bookplate of 'A. Gifford, D.D. of the Museum'. Baptist minister Andrew Gifford (1700-1784) was assistant librarian at the British Museum from 1757 to 1784. He left many of his books, and other objects, to the Baptist College in Bristol. 'In 1747 Stukeley received a letter from a young Englishman named Charles Bertram, resident in Copenhagen, informing him of his discovery of a medieval copy of a previously unknown Roman map and itinerary of Britain, allegedly made by a fourteenth-century monk of Westminster. Stuart Piggott has described this episode as 'one of the most audacious and successful literary forgeries of the eighteenth century' (Piggott, William Stukeley: an Eighteenth-Century Antiquary, 127). Although Stukeley attempted to purchase the (non-existent) manuscript of De situ Britanniae for the newly opened British Museum, the amicable correspondence between him and Bertram did lead to the publication of Stukeley's An Account of Richard of Cirencester, Monk of Westminster, and of his Works (1757) and Bertram's Britannicarum gentium historiae antiquae scriptores tres (1757, including authentic works by Gildas and Nennius). Bertram's forgery as disseminated in these two books was a great success, and De situ was considered an authentic source for Roman Britain (it was even used in part by Edward Gibbon). The forgery was not fully discredited until 1869.' (ODNB) ESTC T68353   Ref: 51077 
£550
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