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Thoresby, Ralph: Ducatus Leodiensis, or, the Topography of the Ancient and Populous Town and Parish of Leedes [...] To which is added, at the Request of Several Learned Persons, A Catalogue of his Musaeum, with the Curiosities Natural and Artificial, and the Antiquities [ London: printed for Maurice Atkins, and sold by Henry Clements [...], 1715. First edition, subscriber's copy. Folio, pp. vi, [ii], v-xxi, 6, 5-114, 109-268, [iii], 276-628, [xii] + portrait frontispiece and 12 further plates, some of which folding. Text continuous, irregular pagination as usual. The separate title-page of the second section, Musaeum Thoresbyanum, is dated 1713. Woodcut headpieces and initials, further illustrations in the text. MS family tree of the Sleigh family tipped in between pages 128 and 129; MS family tree of the Parker family to blank at rear. A few tiny scorches and wax spots, occasional toned plate or gathering. 19th-century light yellowish-brown polished calf, raised bands, spine heavily gilt with black morocco title label and small red date label at tail end; gilt border, frame and dentelles, a.e.g., marbled endpapers. A bit rubbed, a little loss to headcap, small chip to spine, some scratches and scrapes to boards, corners slightly worn but still a handsome copy. Large coat of arms and motto ('Medio tutissimus') of the Sleigh family printed on paper and meticulously cut out (possibly from a bookplate) and pasted onto front the paste-down. To the ffep, a recent armorial bookplate of Lowther-Pinkerton. To the top corner of the title-page, inscription of R. Witton in an old hand. Richard Witton Esq. of Wakefield is listed as one of the subscribers. This could be the barrister Richard Witton (1649-1718), or his son of the same name (1682-1746), both of whom were important local figures and lived at Lupset Hall, Wakefield. To p.1, just above the title, the inscription of Gervase Petty Sleigh dated 9th Dec. 1874. Sleigh (1854-1883) was a captain in the Siamese navy and died at sea while still relatively young. His father John wrote a history of Leeke in Staffordshire (1883). The list of subscribers includes Mr Hugh Sleigh of Leeds, against whose name a small mark has been made, presumably indicating a family member. The MS family tree (Sleigh) on the final blank appears to be in Gervase's hand. The tipped-in family tree (Parker) is in a similar hand, though perhaps not quite the same. References to Leeke have been underlined, suggesting that it may have been the work of his father. 'Thoresby's great work was the Ducatus Leodiensis, or, The Topography of Leedes (1715). From the time he settled on the project in the early 1690s, Thoresby worked industriously towards its completion. This was not the first topographical publication of importance about a provincial town but it was the first work of importance by a Yorkshire antiquary. Attached to the main body of the text was a catalogue of the Musaeum Thoresbyanum and the volume included a very fine map of the area. Ducatus was published by subscription and was dedicated to Peregrine Osborne, marquess of Carmarthen and heir apparent to the duke of Leeds, and to the mayor of Leeds and aldermen of Leeds. About 2000 copies were printed and sold for £3. A second edition appeared in 1816, with notes and additions by Thomas Dunham Whitaker.' (ODNB) ESTC T139372; Upcott 1381-3   Ref: 52024 
£950
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Thoresby, Ralph: Vicaria Leodiensis: or the History of the Church of Leedes in Yorkshire. Containing an account of the learned men, bishops, and writers, who have been vicars of that populous parish; with the Catalogues of their Works, Printed and Manuscript. To which are added, The Lives of several Archbishops of York, and other eminent London: printed for Joseph Smith 1724. 8vo., pp. [xx], 248 + 5 plates, 4 of which folding. Woodcut initials and head- & tail-pieces. Marginal annotations in an old hand, mostly referencing other antiquarian works especially Drake's York, dated 1739 at the end of the text, further notes to paste-downs front and rear. Occasional light spots and smudges, a few plates with short closed tears near attachments. Contemporary dark brown calf neatly rebacked with joints now beginning to wear, edges sprinkled red. Rubbed, corners repaired but repair to corner of upper board lost, edges worn, ffep renewed and toned at edges. Binding a little tired, but still a very good copy with interesting near-contemporary annotations. To the front-paste down, a Chippendale-style (c.1740-1780) bookplate printed in green ink. The unusual arms, which repeat the same design inescutcheon, are those of Charles Eve of Hoxton Square who married his cousin Dorothy Eve (1724-1755) in 1753 in Canterbury. 'Thoresby's (1658-1725) great work was the Ducatus Leodiensis, or, The Topography of Leedes (1715). From the time he settled on the project in the early 1690s, Thoresby worked industriously towards its completion. This was not the first topographical publication of importance about a provincial town but it was the first work of importance by a Yorkshire antiquary.' (ODNB) Encouraged by public interest in his work, Thoresby intended to compliment Ducatus Leodiensis with further historical accounts of Leeds and the surrounding area. Most of his working life between 1716 and 1720 was taken up writing this volume on the history of the Church in Leeds, which was published the year before Thoresby's death and was the only part of the project to appear. ESTC T98271; Upcott 1390   Ref: 52185 
£300
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Thoresby, Ralph; Whitaker, Thomas Dunham: Ducatus Leodiensis: or, the Topography of the Ancient and Populous Town and Parish of Leedes, and Parts Adjacent, in the West-Riding of the Country of York [...]; Loidis and Elmete: or, an Attempt to Illustrate the Districts Described in Those Words by Be Leeds: printed by B. Dewhirst, for Robinson, Son and Holdsworth; and John Hurst, Wakefield, 1816. Second edition. 2 vols., folio (445 x 280mm), pp. [iv], xvi, [i], xvii, [i], 267, [iii], 123, [i], 159, [i], 11, [i] + 10 plates + folding pedigrees of 16 families; pp. [iv], 404, 2, 80 + 58 plates on 54 leaves + 15 folding pedigrees. All plates and pedigrees as called for. Decorative initials and further engraved illustrations in the text. Occasional toning (mostly to plate-adjacent leaves), sporadic foxing. Contemporary half green morocco, spines ornately gilt with red and green labels, marbled paper-covered boards, marbled endpapers. Rubbed, joints, edges and corners worn, some scratches and light scrapes but still a very good, sturdy set. Thoresby (16581725) began work on his great project in the late 1690s, and the first edition of Ducatus Leodiensis was published in 1715. 'This was not the first topographical publication of importance about a provincial town but it was the first work of importance by a Yorkshire antiquary. Attached to the main body of the text was a catalogue of the Musaeum Thoresbyanum and the volume included a very fine map of the area. Ducatus was published by subscription and was dedicated to Peregrine Osborne, marquess of Carmarthen and heir apparent to the duke of Leeds, and to the mayor of Leeds and aldermen of Leeds. About 2000 copies were printed and sold for £3.' (ODNB)   Ref: 51438 
£600
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Thoroton, Robert: The Antiquities of Nottinghamshire, extracted out of Records, original Evidences, Leiger Books, other Manuscripts, and Authentick Authorities. Beautified with Maps, Prospects, and Portaictures. London: printed by Robert White, for Henry Mortlock [...], 1677. First edition. Folio, pp. [xvi], 507, [xxxvii] + 22 plates as called for including four leaves containing 520 coats of arms plus the separate slip of eight further coats of arms, which are bound after the Preface rather than at the rear amongst the indices as indicated in Upcott. Imprimatur leaf followed by title-page in red and black, copious illustrations and genealogical tables in the text, woodcut initials and head-pieces. Occasional tiny holes, scorch and wax marks, never affecting more than a letter or two, some plates neatly repaired, a few faint spots and smudges but generally clean. Mid-20th-century reback on 19th-century boards, mottled brown calf, spine heavily gilt, plain gilt borders, edges coloured red, endpapers renewed. Some significant surface loss due to insect damage at upper joint and a few other smaller patches, lightly scratched and shelf worn, front endpaper split at hinge but board holding firm. A very good copy. A few pencilled booksellers notes to front endpapers. To front paste-down, armorial bookplate of Revd. William Grice (1813-1885), vicar at Sherborne. Robert Thoroton (16231678) 'commenced his Antiquities of Nottinghamshire in 1667. He first worked on some transcript notes which his father-in-law Gilbert Boun had made from Domesday Book. He assisted Sir William Dugdale in his Visitation of Nottinghamshire, 16621664. For his researches he employed paid assistants at considerable expense to himself, delving into family archives, registers (some now lost), estate papers, church monuments, and epitaphs. Like a number of county antiquaries he was little concerned with his own times, or indeed with his own century, but tried to trace the manorial history of each parish back to Domesday. He showed little interest in Roman remains, while protesting at enclosure and destruction of woods. His notes, made on the back of letters from his patients in Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire, and Derbyshire, are now in Nottingham Public Library. The folio volume of Thoroton's Antiquities was printed in London in 1677, illustrated with engravings by Hollar after Richard Hall and dedicated to Gilbert Sheldon, archbishop of Canterbury, and Dugdale, both personal friends. Dugdale wrote to the antiquary Sir Daniel Fleming, 'Dr Thoroton's book cost me 16s to 18s. I do esteem the book well worth your buying, though had he gone to the fountain of records it might have been better done' (1 Sept 1677, Le Fleming MSS, 13940). John Throsby published a reprint of Antiquities with additions, in three volumes (published 179096 but dated 1797).' (ODNB) ESTC R22553; Upcott 1047   Ref: 52182 
£1000
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Toland, John: A Critical History of the Celtic Religion and Learning; Containing an Account of the Druids, or the Priests and Judges, of the Vaids, or the Diviners and Physicians, of the Bards, or the Poets and Heralds, of the Ancient Gauls, Britons, Irish, and Scots. [...] With the History of Abaris, the Hyperborean Priest of the Sun. To Which is Added an Abstract of the Life of the Author. London: Lackington, Allen & Co., 1815. 8vo., pp. [ii], 256. Foxed, improving towards rear. Contemporary dark brown speckled calf, neatly rebacked, gilt spine with green morocco title label. Small chip to tail of spine, corners worn, very good. Tiny label of Eland, Exeter to front paste-down. John Toland (16701722), Irish philosopher and freethinker, was a prolific writer who developed at an early age a critical attitude towards religious thinking; he produced his most famous work, Christianity Not Mysterious (1696), when he was only 25 years old. 'Because Toland's life and writings were filled with challenges to propriety, he generated great hostility. By making reason a criterion of knowledge and faith, he raised doubts about the legitimacy of beliefs and texts and continued to prompt responses from apologists throughout the eighteenth century. His criticism of arbitrary power and his widely read editions of Sidney, Ludlow, Milton, and Harrington had, for many, the unsettling effect of bringing together republican and classical ideals. In the long term it provided a foundation for the whig intellectual tradition that influenced Maximilien Robespierre, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, and Thomas Paine. On the continent Toland's blend of polemics and toleration, his defence of liberty, and critique of religious excess, attracted Voltaire and other Enlightenment figures. ' (ODNB) This volume nicely exemplifies a fairly typical Lackington publication. The publisher and bookseller James Lackington established his shop, 'The Temple of the Muses' in Finsbury Square in 1794. It was famed for both the vastness and cheapness of its stock, and displayed its motto 'The Cheapest Bookstore in the World' proudly on its frontage. Though Lackington himself retired in 1798 publications continued to appear until 1841, when 'The Temple of the Muses' was destroyed by fire.   Ref: 51889 
£200
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Topp, Chester W.: Victorian Yellowbacks & Paperbacks, 1849 - 1905. Volumes I-IX. Denver: Hermitage Antiquarian Bookshop, 1993. Set of 9 vols. Large 8vo. (260 x 180mm), brown cloth, as new.   Ref: 51322 
£180
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[(Triphook, Robert, ed.:)] Miscellanea Antiqua Anglicana; or, a select collection of Curious Tracts, illustrative of the history, literature, manners, and biography, of the English nation. London: Printed by T. Bensley and son, 1816. 4to., pp. [vi], 35, [i], xvi, [iv], 110, xv, [i], 76, iv, [ii], 12, [iv], 20, [xvi], 30, [ii], 46, 50, [ii] + engraved frontispiece. Some foxing and browning. Original paper boards, printed spine label, rubbed and a bit worn, hinges neatly reinforced. Eight 16th and 17th-century tracts and manuscripts, some printed for the first time; each is individually paginated and the dates vary - some 1815 but the final part 1821. The spine label specifies that only 250 copies were printed, and it was intended to begin a series but no further volumes were published.   Ref: 37041  show full image..
£260
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Tucker, Norman (transcribed): The Councell Booke of Ruthin, 1642-1695. Denbighshire Historical Society, n.d (1930). 8vo., pp. 76 + frontispiece. Green cloth, upper board very slightly bowed. Green dust-jacket sunned to spine and price-clipped. Very good. Ffep signed 'To Will with best wishes, Norman'. Also, pencilled ownership inscription of P.A. Slack near head edge. Contains parts I-III, originally published as separate pamphlets.   Ref: 51989 
£35
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Turner, J. Horsfall (ed.:) Halifax, and its Gibbet Law with Appendix. Idel: J. Horsfall Turner, 1886. 1886 reprint of 1708 edition. Small 12mo., pp. [vi], 91, [v] + frontispiece. Blue cloth, gilt. Spine worn, stain causing fading to boards at tail, edges worn and slightly frayed. Small rust marks from staples to rear paste-down. Ownership inscription of P.A. Slack to f.f.e.p.   Ref: 52042 
£15
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Upcott, William: (Simmons, Jack, intro.:) A Bibliographical Account of the Principal Works Relating to English Topography. Wakefield: EP Publishing, 1978. Facsimile edition. 4to., pp. x, (1576, eight reproduced pages per leaf). Black cloth, gilt title to spin. Top edge a little dusty, otherwise fine. Originally published in 1818 in an edition of only 250 copies.   Ref: 51145 
£25
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