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Phaedrus, Gaius Julius: (Burmann, Pieter, ed.:) Fabularum Aesopiarum libri quinque. Cum novo commentario Petri Burmanni. Leidae [Leiden]: Apud Samuelem Luchtmans, 1727. Burman's 4th edition. 4to., pp. [lii], 263, xlix, 93, [iii] + additional engraved title-page. Lacks folding portrait plate. Title-page in red and black with woodcut printer's device, head- and tail-pieces. Francis Hare's 93-page 'Epistola Critica' at rear, the presence of which indicates a large paper copy according to Lamb. A little light dampstaining near gutter, sporadic toning with some gatherings more affected than others, occasional wax spots. Contemporary vellum, title inked to spine, edges sprinkled red and blue. Spine with a red smudge, small hole and remains of a paper label, a little grubby but sound. A scholar's copy, still useful despite the missing plate. 20th-century bookplate of John Denys Parmiter (1902-1989), headmaster of Eagle House School, Wellington College, to front paste-down. Inscription of G[eorge] I[saac] Huntingford dated Aug. 14 1790 also to front paste-down. Huntingford (1748-1832) was tutor and friend of Henry Addington (Prime Minister 1801-4), and served as Bishop of Gloucester 1802–1815, and of Hereford, 1815–32. He published an account of Addington's government, a popular Short Introduction to Writing of Greek and original Greek and Latin verse. 'To this day Burman's edition of 1727 is the only complete commentary on Phaedrus and has not been superceded. Unlike his variorum editions, the notes are Burman's own work. He uses conjecture sparingly and often discusses the emendations of other scholars at considerable length.' (Lamb, Annales Phaedriani, p.vi). Dibdin II (4th ed.) 281; Schweiger II 736; Lamb 167   Ref: 51782 
£100
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Phalaris [...] Epistolae. Ex MSS Recensuit, Versione, Annotationibus, & Vita insuper Authoris Donavit Car. Boyle ex Aede Christi. Oxonii [Oxford]: e typographeo Clarendoniano, 1718. 8vo., pp. [xiv], 154, [vi] + engraved frontispiece. Greek and Latin text. A little soiling at beginning and end. Contemporary Cambridge-style panelled calf, rebacked and re-polished preserving original red morocco label, hinges relined. Bookplate of Cheshunt College Library with 'Withdrawn' stamps to front pastedown. Second impression (first published in 1695) of the book which set off the academic spat which changed the face of English classical scholarship. In his preface Charles Boyle, younger brother of the Earl of Orrery and grand-nephew of Robert Boyle, accuses Richard Bentley, as King's Librarian, of "singular humanity" in denying him adequate access to a manuscript. Thus provoked by this (unfair as it happens) accusation, Bentley published A Dissertation upon the Epistles of Phalaris first in 98 pages and then expanded to about 600, proving the spuriousness of the attribution of the letters to Phalaris, tyrant of Agrigentum. Written in English and proceeding step by step through anachronism, unhistorical use of language and form, dialect, artificiality of content and transmission of text, Bentley set a new benchmark for classical scholarship. The hapless Boyle could have had no idea of the future consequences of his prefatory clause of sarcasm. ESTC T144295. Brunet IV 592.   Ref: 43129 
£475
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Philostratus, L. Flavius 'the Athenian'; Philostratus 'the Lemnian' & Philostratus 'the Younger'?; ['Apollonius of Tyana'; Eusebius of Caesarea; Callistratus:] (Olearius, G., ed.:) [Opera] quae supersunt omnia. Vita Apollonii libris VIII, Vitae Sophistorum libris II, Heroica, Imagines Priores atque Posteriores, et Epistolae. Accessere Apollonii Tyanensis epistolae, Eusebii liber adversus Hieroclem, Callistrati descript. statuarum [...] Lipsiae [Leipzig]: Apud Thomam Fritsch, 1709. First edition thus. Folio, pp. [viii], xliii, [i], 987, [i]. Half-title, title in red and black with printer's Pegasus device, woodcut initials and head- and tail-pieces, occasional small engravings in the text. A little faint foxing, a very small number of toned leaves (e.g. Q2). Contemporary dark brown calf, gilt spine with raised bands, dark red morocco title label, edges coloured red, marbled endpapers. Rubbed with faint crackling to surface, endcaps worn and endbands lost, joints creased and starting to crack at head and tail but boards holding firm, corners fraying. Still, a very good copy overall. Olearius's edition of the Philostrati, which uses unpublished notes by the scholar Richard Bentley. Works present include an account of the 1st century AD Pythagorean Apollonius of Tyana, of other pagan sophists, of the cults of heroes of the Trojan war, and letters on themes of love (Ben Jonson's 'To Celia' is derived from letter 33), and descriptions of artistic images. Also included are letters once attributed to Apollonius of Tyana; descriptions of statues by Callistratus (fl. 3rd or 4th century), an imitator of Philostratus; and the treatise of Eusebius of Caesarea (c.AD 260-339) against comparisons between Apollonius and Christ. Gottfried Olearius (1672-1715) was brought up and educated in Leipzig, where from 1709 he was professor of theology. He travelled in Holland and England in 1693.   Ref: 51001 
£500
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Plautus, Titus Maccius: (Gronovius, J.F., ed.:) Comoediae. Accedit commentarius [...] Lugd. Batavorum [Leiden]: Ex Officina Hackiana, 1664. First edition. 8vo., pp. [xvi] 1154 [lii]. Engraved title page, woodcut initials. Occasional spots of light foxing and browning but generally very clean. Contemporary vellum, title inked to spine, fore-edges turned in, edges sprinkled blue. Paper edge label with 'Plautus Gronovii & variorum' in an old hand tipped to tail edge of upper board. A few smudgy marks to boards, top edge a bit darkened, paper edge label crumpled and a little toned but an interesting addition to an already very good copy. Small oval paper label with MS '195' to spine; pale blue bookplate of Fintray House library, with E.195 added by hand. The first Gronovius edition of Plautus, with notes by him and others, and new readings from 6 MSS. Dibdin (4th edn.) II 312. Schweiger III 766. Graesse V 329.   Ref: 51893 
£225
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Plautus, Titus Maccius: (Taubmann, Friedrich, ed.:) Comoediae XX superstites, nunc denuo, post omnium Editiones, ad fidem meliorum [Colophon: Wittebergae [Wittenberg] apud Zachariam Schurerum [typis Johannis Gormanni] 1612. 4to., pp. [xl] 1320 [cxxiv]. Mostly Roman and Italic letter. Printer's device to title-page, repeated on final leaf recto (a colophon leaf with verso blank). Some nice woodcut headpieces. Sig. 3Q4 [pp. [1231-1232]] is blank save for woodcut device on recto. Browning, some spotting, a few leaves short in the bottom margin (blank), bound in contemporary vellum, overlapping along the long edge, soiled, ties removed. All edges red. Old MS shelfmark label to foot of spine (shelfmark repeated in pencil on front pastedown), a very small and unobtrusive old armorial ownership or library stamp to title-page. Second and best edition by Friedrich Taubmann of Wittenberg (1565-1613). Celebrated most for its clear and complete commentaries, the product of nearly 20 years' work (Schweiger), the book is also of interest for the contemporary world it shows up: there are letters to Taubmann by the celebrated figures Justus Lipsius, Daniel Heinsius, Isaac Casaubon, and Joseph Scaliger, and the prefatory poems include a short work, by a Bohemian called Christopher Cinesius, in Syriac and Greek! Taubmann made use of collations provided by Jan Gruter (1560-1627), the last librarian of the Palatine library in Heidelberg, whose priceless manuscripts were removed to the Vatican in 1623, after the defeat of the elector Frederick of Bohemia. Gruter produced his own edition of Plautus based on Taubmann's work in 1621. Dibdin (4th edn.) II 311. Schweiger III 764. VD 17 1:043513Q.   Ref: 21248  show full image..
£450
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Polignac, Melchior de: Anti-Lucretius, sive de Deo et Natura, libri novem. Parisiis [Paris]: Apud Hippolytum-Ludovicum Guerin, & Jacobum Guerin 1747. 2 vols., 8vo., pp. [ii] xxx [ii] 180; [iv] 181-450 + frontispiece. Without half-title in first volume. Some light browning and spotting. Contemporary calf, neatly rebacked with old green morocco gilt labels preserved, corners and hinges renewed, old leather scratched and slightly worn around the sides. A posthumously published poem in the Lucretian style offering a Christian and Cartesian refutation of Lucretius and Epicurean philosophy. Cardinal Polignac's (1661-1742) philosophy is "questionable, but the poem is, in form, the best imitation of Lucretius and Virgil extant" (Catholic Encyclopedia). Brunet IV 777.   Ref: 25031 
£200
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Pollux, Julius: (Lederlin, J.H.; Hemsterhuys, T.): Onomasticon Graece & Latine. Amstelaedami [Amsterdam]: Ex Officina Wetsteniana, 1706. 2 vols., folio, pp. [viii] 683 [i]; [ii] 687-1388 178 [x] + 1 folding plate. Half-title to each volume, to vol. I. an engraved title and engraved frontispiece with Amsterdam coat of arms, vol.I title page in red and black, woodcut initials, parallel Greek and Latin texts. Fold-out plate of coins before p.1027 in vol. II. The first page of text in each volume has a portion of its fore-edge margin excised, seemingly to remove ms. Occasional faint staining to fore-edge margins, a few wax spots, upper half of r.f.e.p. excised. Contemporary blind-tooled vellum, titles inked to spines, edges sprinkled red. Spines a little darkened, slightly grubby with a few small stains but a very good set. To the front of each volume a partially erased ownership inscription dated 1837. An interesting and important edition of the 2nd-century AD Greek thesaurus of Iulius Pollux, which had been begun and abandoned by Jean-Henri Lederlin (1672-1737). His replacement as editor, Tiberius Hemsterhuys (1685-1766), professor at Amsterdam, has "the honour of reviving the study of Greek in the Netherlands" (Sandys). For this edition he wrote for advice to Richard Bentley, the expert on Greek metre, but received his suggestions after the book went to press. Bentley later sent a long letter giving corrections to the texts of the fragments of comedy as found here in book 10. "So deep was [Hemsterhuys's] distress that he determined to abandon Greek for ever, and for two months did not dare to open a Greek book" (ibid.) Pollux is a source of information on many subjects, including theatre, the Athenian constitution, and the thirty-three terms of abuse for a tax-collector. The text survived only in interpolated copies of an early interpolated epitome. Schweiger I 270: "Gute Ausg." Sandys II 449; Hoffmann III, 262.   Ref: 50152 
£750
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Pollux, Julius: (Lederlinus, J.H., and T. Hemsterhuis, comm.:) Onomasticum Graece & Latine. Post egregiam illam Wolfgangi Seberi editionem denuo immane quantum emendatum, suppletum, & illustratum, ut docebunt praefationes ; praeter W. Seberi notas olim editas ; accedit commentarius doctissimus Gothofredi Jungermanni, nunc tandem a tenebris Amstelaedami: ex Officina Wetsteniana, 1706. 2 vols. Folio, pp. [viii], 48, 683, [i]; [ii], 687-1388, [xvi], 178, [x] + folding plate to vol. II. Addtional engraved title page and frontispiece, title page in red and black, woodcut initials. Very occasional light foxing and patchy toning, a few tiny wax spots but generally clean within. Slightly later lightly speckled brown calf, ornate gilt spines with terracotta-coloured morocco labels, edges sprinkled red. Joints cracking but cords holding firm, endcaps worn with some loss, a bit rubbed, corners bumped, a little creasing to endpapers. A good, attractive set. Wellington College Boys' Library bookplate to each front paste-down. The Onomasticon, a 2nd century AD thesaurus of Attic Greek phrases which preserves much significant material, as edited primarily by J. H. Lederlin - with the last three books taken care of by Hemsterhuis. The edition impressed Bentley, who sent Hemsterhuis an admiring letter, including some conjectures of his own on the text (and it is said that the brilliance of these conjectures nearly put the Dutch scholar off any future attempts at Greek).   Ref: 51003  show full image..
£450
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Prior, Matthew: Poems on Several Occasions. London: Printed for Jacob Tonson, and John Barber, 1718. Large Paper Copy (460 x 280mm). Folio, pp. [xlii], 506, [vi], including engraved frontispiece. Paper with Strasburg bend watermark (fleur-de-lys surmounting a shield), which generally denotes a subscriber's copy, as normal copies were issued with the London arms watermark.. Finely engraved title-page vignette, head-and tail-pieces, ornaments and initials. Occasional offsetting, a little light marginal foxing, some leaves a bit toned (e.g. 5F), ink stain to p.8 showing through to p.7 but not obscuring text. Contemporary Cambridge-style panelled calf, neatly rebacked, spine heavily gilt with raised bands and red morocco label, edges sprinkled red; corners, some edges and a scrape to lower board neatly repaired. Horizontal closed tear to headcap, lightly rubbed, inner hinges repaired, a few spots and smudges to endpapers and three dots of red sealing wax to each paste-down. A very handsome copy of the finest edition of this work. Early 18th-century Jacobean style armorial bookplate with arms of the Tryon family to front paste-down, with 'M.8.' pencilled beneath. Rowland Tryon Esq. and William Tryon Esq. both appear in the List of Subscribers. Rowland Tryon was a nephew of Sir Philip Warwick and inherited Frognal House in Bromley from him in 1691. Though his family were from working class origins, Rowland had made his fortune trading in the West Indies. He died in 1720 and left the house to his brother William, a wealthy City financier and philanthropist. To the title-page verso, bookplate of Sir Peter Thompson in the Chippendale style, with the motto 'Nil Conscire Sibi', signed Mynde. Thompson (1698–1770) was a successful merchant and enthusiatic book collector. 'Much of his posthumous claim to fame rests on his book collection which included the pioneering topographical works of William Borlase and William Stukeley, and many manuscripts and annotated works of contemporary antiquaries, particularly Joseph Ames and John Lewis. Books bearing his bookplate are to be found in several major libraries. He left his library to his namesake, Captain Peter Thompson of the Dorset militia, who was his godson and relative, and who kept the books packed up in boxes in the house until 1781. However, the collection remained intact until 1815 when it was sold by E. H. Evans.' (ODNB) Having been questioned by a secret committee investigating corruption and treason in the Tory party in 1715, Prior found himself confined in the home of the serjeant-at-arms of the House of Commons for more than a year before being released 26th June 1716. Upon his release, his political career irretrievably over, he was in a desparate situation financially. 'To assist him, Bathurst and Lord Harley conceived the scheme of bringing out his poems in a subscription edition. Details of the plan were worked out at a meeting in January 1717, at which Bathurst, Harley, Prior, Pope, Gay, Arbuthnot, and Erasmus Lewis were present. Jacob Tonson, who was much experienced in subscription publication, was to be its publisher, and Alexander Pope, who had himself recently brought out his Iliad in a very successful subscription, would be a valuable adviser. When the volume finally appeared in mid-March 1719, it was a large, handsome folio, 1 foot across and 1 yard tall, 500 pages long, with a list of 1445 persons who had subscribed for 1786 books. The book reprinted and reordered all the poems from the 1709 edition of Poems on Several Occasions and added a number of poems written since that time, notably Solomon and Alma. Though he probably did not make as much money as is commonly cited (4000 guineas), Prior undeniably made a small fortune by this publication and found himself comfortably off for the rest of his life, independently wealthy and no longer dependent on repayments from a remiss and recalcitrant government.' (ODNB) The size of this volume, the largest issued, has often attracted comment. In his note to the 1905 edition of Poems on Several Occasions, its editor A.R. Waller writes: 'This folio was issued in three sizes [...] Of these eighteenth-century examples of large-paper issues Mr Austin Dobson remarks, "with the small copy of 1718 Johnson might have knocked down Osborne the bookseller; with the same work in its tallest form... Osborne the bookseller might have laid prostrate the 'Great Lexicographer' himself." Those who have seen the "greatest" copy will not doubt the truth of this statement. Desirous of being suitably equipped in the "Battle of the Books", I have used a medium copy measuring 16 3/8 ins. x 10 3/4 ins.' In imperial terms, the copy here measures 18 1/2 ins. x 11 3/4. ESTC T75639; Foxon 641   Ref: 52035 
£600
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Prior, Matthew: Poems on Several Occasions. London: printed for J. and R. Tonson and S. Draper and H. Lintot, 1754. 12mo., pp. [xxiv], 402, [vi], including portrait frontispiece. Sporadic toning and foxing, particularly to margins. Contemporary polished brown calf, raised bands, red label to spine, traces of red to edges. Spine rubbed with surface crackling, upper joint and head of lower joint repaired, inner hinged repaired, endpapers toned at edges. Still very good overall. Inscription of E. Richmond Swales to front paste-down. Older inscription with the surname Le Mesurier to title-page. COPAC finds this issue as a single volume (1754) and also as a two-volume set (1754-1767). Whilst nothing internally indicates any lack, a barely visible 'I' to the spine suggests that this volume may once have been accompanied by a second work. Matthew Prior (1664–1721), was a gifted poet and diplomat. Prior began his education at Westminster School, but his father's death in 1675 forced him to leave and begin work in his brother's tavern. The following year Charles Sackville, sixth earl of Dorset (patron of Dryden and Congreve amongst others), visited the tavern and observed the twelve-year-old Prior reading Horace whilst working behind the bar. 'Dorset asked Matthew to construe a passage or two of Horace, then to turn a Horatian ode into English. He did so with such skill that on subsequent visits to the tavern Dorset often asked him to entertain his friends and himself by turning Horace or Ovid into English verse. Finally, the earl of Dorset offered to pay Prior's tuition to return to Westminster School, if his uncle Arthur would pay for his clothing and other necessities. The Priors gratefully accepted this offer, and Matthew returned to Westminster School about 1676, becoming a king's scholar there in 1681, an award based on his distinction in classical languages.' (ODNB) Prior went on to win one of the first five Duchess of Somerset scholarships to St John's College, Cambridge, and graduated in 1687. Poems on Several Occasions' first appearance was in 1707, in a pirated edition produced by Edmund Curll. Tonson printed the first official edition, meticulously prepared by Prior, in 1709. 'Prior himself spoke of the poetry contained in this collection as divided into four categories—'Public Panegyrics', 'Amorous Odes', 'Idle Tales', and 'Serious Reflections'—but some of its most famous poems ('Henry and Emma', 'An English Padlock', and 'Jinny the Just') do not fit easily into any one of these four categories.' (ODNB). The book proved extremely popular and a second edition was printed in the same year, followed by further editions in 1711, 1713, and 1717. ESTC T75658   Ref: 52037 
£30
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