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Rous, John: (Hearne, Thomas, ed.:) Antiquarii Warwicensis Historia Regum Angliae. E Codice MS. in Bibliotheca Bodlejana descripsit, Notisque & Indice Adornavit Tho. Hearnius... Accedit Joannis Lelandi antiquarii Naenia in mortem Henrici Duddelegi Equitis; cui praefigitur tTstimonium de Lelando amplum & praeclarum, hactenus ineditu Oxonii [Oxford]: e Theatro Sheldoniano [...] Impensis Jac. Fletcher Bibliop. Oxon. & J. Pote Etonens 1745. Second edition. 8vo., pp. xxxvi, 236 + 2 folding plates. A little light foxing, some gatherings slightly toned (e.g. E). Recently rebound in mustard half calf, raised bands, spine blind tooled and highlighted in green with a little gilt, orange spine labels with gilt titles, dark brown marbled boards, edges sprinkled brown and red, endpapers renewed, very good. Uniformly bound with our stock number 51817, Peter Langtoft's Chronicle (1725). 'As a historian, Rous can be faulted. He is often inaccurate about dates and details, and he mingled history with legend like all his English contemporaries. Nevertheless, he used a wide range of writers, often referred to his sources, and compared the population figures given in the hundred rolls of 1279 with those of places in his own day. He recognized the historical value of paintings and monuments, and though he did not altogether master the history of costume, he had an understanding of the evolution of body armour. His lists of university halls and deserted villages show an eye for institutions disregarded in his own day. With his contemporary and fellow Oxonian, William Worcester, he is deservedly recognized as one of the earliest major English antiquaries.' (ODNB) ESTC T139044   Ref: 51815 
£275
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Rymer, Thomas: The Tragedies of the Last Age, Consider'd and Examin'd by the Practice of the Ancients, and by the Common Sense of all Ages in a Letter to Fleetwood Shepheard, Esq. London: Printed and are to be sold by Richard Baldwin [...] 1692. 2nd edition. 8vo., pp. [xvi], 144. Imprimatur leaf opposite title page dated July 17 1677, half-page printer's advertisement to final leaf verso. Fore-edge corner of title-page repaired at head, small rust mark near head of p.1, closed tear to bottom edge pp. 39-40 affecting bottom 4 lines of text but with no loss, a little grubby towards edges, occasional spots of foxing. Recent half tan morocco, raised bands and gilt title to spine, marbled boards, edges coloured red, endpapers renewed. Spine lightly sunned, a little dusty, very good. An MS note on Thomas Rymer to the imprimatur leaf recto; to the verso, inscription of (Charles?) Callan dated 1785, 'Ex. Lib.' with the name then removed, and a small note '2nd part never published'. The title-page identifies this as 'Part I', but in fact the old note is correct that no further parts were published. The first edition appeared in 1678 without 'Part I' on the title page. In this critical essay Thomas Rymer (1642/3–1713) identifies what he believes to be 'the choicest and most applauded English Tragedies of that last age; as Rollo; A King and No King; the Maid's Tragedy, by Beaumont and Fletcher; Othello, Julius Cæsar, by Shakespeare; and Cataline by Worthy Ben', and considers them in the context of classical tragedy. 'Rymer managed to rehearse the plots of the first three plays (Rollo is of uncertain authorship) and to analyse the plays according to his views on how tragedy should be written. He advocated strict compliance with the theory of decorum—characters were stereotyped, with soldiers being courageous; women, modest. Poetical justice demanded that the good be rewarded, the evil punished. Plots should not be improbable; plays should have a moral.' (ODNB) Indeed, Rymer is credited with coining the expression 'poetic justice'. ESTC R7998; Wing R2431   Ref: 52268 
£225
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[Sallust] Sallustius Crispus, Gaius: Opera Omnia quae exstant. Amstelodami [Amsterdam]: Ex Officina Henrici & Viduae Theodori Boom, 1690. 8vo., pp. [xxvi] 596 [xxxviii] + add. engraved titlepage. A little light browning and spotting, faint dampmark to title, library stamp to title recto and verso, last leaf, and one other leaf, faint dampmark to title. Early 20th-century tan calf by F. & T. Aitken, neatly rebacked, spine in six compartments with raised bands, tan morocco gilt label, corners lightly worn, a few small marks to boards. Bookplate of Peterhouse College, Cambridge, to upper pastedown and their shelfmark to title. The last and best in a line of some half-dozen Dutch variorum editions of Sallust. "This is the best variorum edition...besides the notes of Gronovius, it contains the entire commentaries of Rivius, Paul Manutius, Ciaconius, and others; with the select notes of Gruter and Glareanus, &c. &c. It is a valuable book..." (Dibdin). Schweiger II 879. Dibdin (4th edn.) II 385.   Ref: 24004  show full image..
£150
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[Sallust] Sallustius Crispus, Gaius: (Mattaire, Michael, ed.:) [Opera] quae extant. Londini [London]: Ex officina Jacobi Tonson, & Johannis Watts, 1713. 12mo., pp. [xiv], 179, [xi] + engraved portrait. Title-page in red and black. Lightly toned, occasional minor spotting, portrait offset onto facing page. Late 19th-century green long grain morocco, spine in six compartments with raised bands, second and third compartments and foot gilt-lettered direct, a.e.g., small scrape to front joint, spine slightly sunned. Mattaire's edition of Sallust, one of several classical authors he edited in the same year for Tonson & Watts. Although his editions were of no great textual significance, they were always elegantly printed and usually (as here) accompanied by exhaustive indices. ESTC T111402.   Ref: 40551 
£225
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[Sallust] Sallustius Crispus, Gaius; Florus, Lucius Annaeus; Velleius Paterculus, Gaius: (Crispinus, Daniel, Anne Le Fevre & Robert Riguez, eds.:) [Opera] Quae extant. In usum serenissimi Galliarum Delphini, diligenter recensuit, & Notulas addidit Daniel Crispinus. [Bound with:] Rerum Romanarum Epitome. Interpretatione et notis illustravit Anna Tanaquilli Fabri filia. [And:] Historiae Romanae ad M. Vinicium Cos. li Parisiis [Paris]: Apud Fredericum Leonard, 1674; 1674; 1675. 4to., pp. [xxx], 234, [cxxvi], [xxii], 205, [clix], [xxviii], 151, [lxxxix] + an engraved frontispiece to each work. Age-toned throughout, some light foxing and spotting, blank lower margin of second title-page renewed early on. 18th-century vellum boards, spine in 5 compartments with raised bands, red morocco label in second compartment, old paper shelfmark label to foot, long sides overlapping. Booklabel with motto 'sollicitae iucunda oblivia vitae' to front pastedown, and an early ownership inscription to the foot of each title-page 'Laurentii Paralos'(?). The Delphin editions, produced as part of a project to newly edit and annotate all of classical literature to aid the education of the French Dauphin, of Sallust, Lucius Annaeus Florus, and Velleius Paterculus, all bound together. The Sallust is edited by Daniel Crespin, one of the primary editors of the series, the Florus by the notable scholar Anne Dacier (nee Le Fevre), and the Velleius Paterculus by the Jesuit Robert Riguez.   Ref: 40548 
£400
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Salvian of Marseilles: A treatise of God's government and of the justice of his present dispensations in this world. London: printed for S. Keble, 1700. 8vo., pp. [xxiv], 255, [i]. Some headlines cropped. Browned and foxed in places, some staining, early clumsy inscription to head of title page, later advisory manuscript verse to initial blank. Later quarter calf with marbled boards, corners tipped with vellum, spine renewed preserving old label, endpapers renewed at various times. The first full translation into English of the greatest work of the 5th-century Christian writer Salvian of Marseilles, a treatise arguing that God maintained continuous close governance of the world; therefore, it concludes, the barbarian invasions of Rome were punishment for the immoral and dissolute inhabitants of the city. ESTC R16712.   Ref: 40117 
£300
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[Sanchuniathon] Cumberland, R.: (Payne, S., pref.:) Sanchoniatho's Phoenician History, Translated from the First Book of Eusebius, De Praeparatione Evangelica. With a Continuation of Sanchoniatho's History of Eratosthenes Cyrenaeus's Canon, which Dicaerchus Connects with the First Olympiad [...] London: printed by W[illiam]. B[owyer]. for R. Wilkin, 1720. First edition thus. 8vo., pp. xxxii, xvii-xxii (i.e. xxxiii-xxxviii misnumbered), [ii], 488 + folding chart. Woodcut head- and tail-pieces, and initials. Sporadic light toning, edges of ffep and title-page toned, folding chart protruding very slightly at fore-edge and with a short closed tear along the central fold. Contemporary Cambridge-style panelled calf, recently rebacked, raised bands, red morocco gilt spine label, edges sprinkled red. A little rubbed, a tiny hole and a scrape to surface of upper board, corners fraying. A very good, sound copy. Small oval bookplate lettered AF to front paste-down. Illegible ownership inscription to head of title page. The preface (sig. A-C), reimposed in half sheets, was separately issued; here its final gathering C is mislabelled E. Cumberland (1632–1718) had already published several well-respected works by the time he produced the manuscript for Sanchoniatho's Phoenician History. It was 'the first English translation of this controversial fragment of Phoenician ancient history, which is recorded in the work of Eusebius; it appeared together with a detailed commentary that sought to reconcile Sanchoniatho's history with the Bible. Sanchoniatho's account revealed the means by which the Phoenicians had corrupted sacred history to deify their own versions of biblical individuals. Cumberland traced the resulting polytheism and idolatry to its most recent manifestation in the Roman Catholic church. On the eve of the revolution of 1688 Cumberland's publisher thought the work too controversial to publish.' (ODNB) It was eventually published posthumously in 1720, prefaced with a biographical memoir by Cumberland's son-in-law and domestic chaplain, Squire Payne. On the subject of Sanchiniathon's disputed authenticity, he writes 'The Humour which prevail'd with several learned Men to reject Sanchuniatho as a counterfeit because they knew not what to make of him, his Lordship always blam'd Philo Byblius, Porphyry and Eusebius, who were better able to judge than any Moderns, never call in question his being genuine.' The modern view is that Philo's summary of Sanchuniathon offers a Hellenistic view of Phoenician materials, or is otherwise a literary invention of Philo. ESTC T100370; Maslen and Lancaster, Bowyer Ledgers, 695   Ref: 51769 
£175
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[Scriptores Rei Rusticae] Cato, Marcus Porcius; Varro, Marcus Terentius; Columella, Lucius Junius Moderatus et al. (Gesner, Johann Matthias, ed.;) (Ernesti, Johann August, rev.:) Scriptores Rei Rusticae Veretes Latini [...] Lipsiae (Leipzig): sumptibus Caspari Fritsch, 1773; 1774. Second edition. 2 vols. 4to., pp. [vii], lviii, 936; [iv], 448, 163, [i] + frontispiece to vol. I and 6 further folding plates. Engraved vignette to each title-page. Some spotting and browning due to paper quality as usual with Fritsch (but less than sometimes seen), final plate a little oversized and therefore crumpled at edges. Contemporary speckled tan calf, red and green morocco gilt spine labels, edges sprinkled red. Vol. I head-cap a little chipped, a few small stains and patchy fading but overall a very good set. Armorial bookplate of the Right Hon. Henry Hobhouse (1854-1937), Liberal MP for East Somerset and father of the peace activist and prison reformer Stephen Hobhouse (1881-1961) and Arthur Hobhouse (1886-1965), architect of the National Park system of England and Wales. A collection of classical works on agriculture and natural history thought to have been assembled in the Middle Ages, and certainly printed at least 5 times before 1501. This production sees Ernesti revise Gesner's 1735 edition. Schweiger II, 1307   Ref: 50153 
£350
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Seneca (the Younger): Publilius Syrus: (Haverkamp, Syvert & Preiger, Abraham, eds.:) [...] Singulares Sententiae centum aliquot versibus ex codd. Pall. & Frising. auctae & correctae, studio & opera Jani Gruteri. cum notis ejusdem recognitis & castigatis. accedunt ejusdem notae postumae ut & nova versio Graeca Josephi Scaligeri [...] nunc primum ex utriusque aut Lugduni Batavorum [Leiden]: apud Johannem du Vivie, 1708. 8vo., pp. [xxviii], 569, [v]. Additional engraved title-page, title-page in red and black with engraved vignette, woodcut head- and tail-pieces. Sporadic light foxing, evidence in gutter preceeding engraved title of presentation certificate removal. Contemporary vellum prize binding, gilt spine with red morocco label, gilt crest of The Hague to each board, edges sprinkled red. Spine label a little chipped, some greyish marks, boards slightly bowed, top edge dusty. Bookplate of Maurice B. Worms to front paste-down, possibly Maurice Benedict de Worms (1805-67), an Austrian plantation owner descended from the Rothschild family. Modern ink inscription to f.f.e.p., 'A.S.B. from A.J.C. Easter mcmlx'. Taken from works including De Moribus, these writings are now attributed to 'Pseudo-Seneca'. Containing 'some notes of Scaliger and Gruter... The engraved frontispiece, representing the subjects of the several plays, is very spiritedly executed.' (Dibdin). Dibdin II, 398   Ref: 48985 
£200
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Silius Italicus: De Secundo Bello Punico. Amsterodami [Amsterdam]: Apud Guiljel. Janssonium, 1620. 16mo. in 8's, pp. 279, [i]. Title-page with engraved historiated border. Occasional light stains and smudges. Later parchment over thin boards, black and gilt label to spine, edges sprinkled red. A bit grubby, tiny nick to parchment at head edge, very good. Armorial bookplate of John Peter Fearon (c.1804-73) to front pastedown. 'John Peter Fearon was a distinguished parliamentary lawyer and acted for the major railway companies at that time. He also acted for the Meuse and Sambre railway in Belgium. He was also a Solicitor to the Attorney General in Charity Affairs. He was, among many other matters, also responsible for the drafting of new Charters for New College, Oxford and St Cross, Winchester.' (fearonlaw dot com) Pocket-sized copy of Silius Italicus's (c.28 – c.103) only surviving work, the 17-book Punica, an epic poem about the Second Punic War. Schweiger 955   Ref: 51724 
£125
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