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(Brome, Alexander:) A Collection of Loyal Songs Written Against the Rump Parliament: Between the Years 1639 and 1661. Containing a great variety of merry and diverting characters of the chief sectaries, who were the principal actors in that whole scene of affairs. With an historical introduction to the whole. London: Printed for J. Stone [...] 1731. 2 vols., 12mo., pp.[xiv], 264; [vi], 288. With woodcut initials, head- and tail-pieces. Each volume bound without its initial blank, very occasional light spots and smudges but generally very clean within. 19th-century deep maroon cross-grain morocco, spines ornately gilt with raised bands and title & volume labels, fine gold borders, corner tools and dentelles to each board, a.e.g., marbled endpapers. Raised bands slightly rubbed, upper joints a little worn and corners a little worn. A very good, attractively-bound set. Ink inscription to a preliminary blank, 'Simon / from Daddy. 1939.' Tiny inkstamp to each ffep verso, 'Bound by Lloyd, London'. An expanded edition of Brome's Ratts Rhimed to Death: Rump-Parliament hang'd up in the shambles, which first appeared (also anonymously) in 1660. 'Though he was a successful attorney, Brome's claim to fame derives from his avocation as poet. Between 1640 and 1660 Brome composed over 200 poems, including love poems in the cavalier mode, satires attacking the enemies of the king and, later, the Commonwealth government, drinking songs in the Anacreontic tradition, an assortment of occasional poems, translations of epigrams from the Greek and Latin, and other translations. Some of these poems were printed anonymously, while others appeared as dedications or in poetical miscellanies.' (ODNB) ESTC T145238 ; Lowndes 1593   Ref: 51879 
£200
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Browne, Thomas: Pseudodoxia Epidemica: or Enquiries into Very Many Received Tenents, and Commonly Presumed Truths. The Second Edition, Corrected and much Enlarged by the Author. Together with some Marginall Observations, and a Table Alphabeticall at the end. London: printed by A. Miller, for Edw. Dod and Nath. Ekins, at the Gunne in Ivie Lane, 1650. 2nd ed. Folio, pp. [xvi], 329, [xi]. Imprimatur to leaf B4, verso; woodcut initials and head- and tail-pieces. A few small annotations. Sporadic light dampstaining at gutter widening out, and then at bottom margin pp.65-84 and again pp.113-7. Occasional wax spots and ink smudges, small closed tear to gutter leaf C4 and leaf 2O, not affecting text. Contemporary dark brown calf, raised bands, plain triple-filet borders to boards. Rubbed with a few small patches of surface loss and faint marks, spine a bit creased, small repair to headcap, endpapers renewed, very good. To front paste-down, small bookplate of Robert Montgomery, Convoy (County Donegal) with crest and motto, and his ownership inscription to title-page. Also to the title-page, ownership inscriptions of: Josua Edisbury; Samson Archer; (Sam. or Dan.?) Law; Robt. Ball. The names appear almost as a list, and 'to' has been added between each to give a sense of the book being passed on. To head margin of p.121, inscription of Charles Archer dated 1717/1718. Josua Edisbury (d. c.1718) was educated at Brasenose College, Oxford (matriculated 1653) and became Sheriff of Denbighshire in 1682. Two years later he began building work on an ambitious new hall at Erdigg, running into severe financial trouble in the process. Robert Montgomery of Brandrim inherited an estate in Convoy from his cousin Sandy Montgomery in November of 1807. Pseudodoxia, first published in 1646, was Sir Thomas Browne's (16051682) most substantial work: 'almost an encyclopaedia of seventeenth-century misconceptions and new knowledge, Browne took up numerous false beliefs particularized in the Apology of George Hakewill; and, with a larger number of his own finding (some already mentioned in Religio medici), he put them in the framework suggested by Francis Bacon in his Advancement of Learning (as translated by Gilbert Watts, 1640) of "a calendar of falsehoods and of popular errors now passing unargued in natural history and in opinions, that sciences be no longer distempered and embased by them". Browne still had religious motives: to "repaire our primarie ruins" (I.5), the loss of Adam's universal knowledge of the natural world by the fall, and "to enforce the wonder of its Maker" (II.3), and theology as well as philosophy figure in the first book's systematic survey of the causes of error, from the fall of man, through logical and verbal misunderstanding, laziness, deference to antiquity and authority, to the wiles of the Devil. In the following six books, he subjects to "the three determinators of truth, Authority, Sense and Reason" (III.5) [...] a host of misbeliefs concerning the natural world, human physiology, pictorial representation, geography, history, biblical interpretation, and classical antiquity. While he records about a hundred personal experiments on subjects animal, vegetable, and mineral (ranging from amber, ants, and bitterns to toads, turkeys, and yew berries), he cites twelve times as many authors: in Certain Physiological Essays (1661) Robert Boyle accordingly respects him as both "the learned Dr Brown" and "so faithful and candid a Naturalist". The science and learning are sharpened with witty irony as Browne disposes of the "misapprehension, fallacy or false deduction, credulity, supinity, adherence unto Antiquity, Tradition and Authority" of two millennia, which have conceived a world of shrieking mandrakes, lopsided badgers, griffins, phoenixes, mermaids, ominous owls, the wandering Jew, Pope Joan, and Aeschylus brained by a tortoise, through to the last chapter, in which he points out a bright side to the all too believable account of necrophiliac embalmers in Egypt: "Surely, if such depravities there be yet alive, deformity need not despaire; nor will the eldest hopes be ever superannuated, since death hath spurres, and carcasses have beene courted" (VII.19).' (ODNB) ESTC R2160   Ref: 52270 
£600
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Browne, Thomas: The Works. Edited by Geoffrey Keynes. (comprising of) I. Religio Medici Christian Morals. A Letter to a Friend. II. Pseudodoxia Epidemica Books I-III. III. Pseudodoxia Epidemica Books IV-VII. IV.Hydriotaphia Brampton Urns. The Garden of Cyrus. V. Letters. VI. M London: Faber & Gwyer Limited, 1928-31. 6 vols. 8vo., portrait frontispieces Bound in blue cloth gilt, top edges gilt and others untrimmed, spines sunned, a bit shelf-worn but a good, firm set. Pencilled marginalia to some volumes, copious to Vol. II, to which vol. a printed portrait of the author has been added to front pastedown.   Ref: 29743 
£180
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Burn, John Southerden: The History of Parish Registers in England. London: John Russell Smith, 1863. 8vo., pp. 296. Bookplate and ownership stamp to f.f.e.p. Brown original Cloth. Head and tail of spine a little frayed, corners bumped, but very good.   Ref: 37661  show full image..
£40
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Burton, Janet E. (ed.): English Episcopal Acta V: York, 1070-1154. Oxford University Press for the British Academy, 1988. 8vo., pp. li, 152 + 4 plates. Red cloth, gilt; a little bumping and scratching, a few minor marks. Very good.   Ref: 42447 
£24
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Burton, William: A Commentary on Antoninus his Itinerary, or Journies of the Romane Empire, so far as it Concerneth Britain [...] London: printed by Tho. Roycroft (for) Henry Twyford, and T. Twyford, 1658. Small folio (285 x 190mm), pp. [xx], 266, [vi] + 2 plates: portrait frontispiece (by Hollar) and double-page map. Lacking single-leaf 'Preface to the Reader' (but see below). Title-page in red and black, woodcut initials, illustrations in the text, errata to final leaf verso. Small burn-hole to pp.33-4 just touching a few letters, pp. 141-2 creased during binding, very occasional spotting and a few slight smudges, front and rear blanks darkened at edges. Contemporary calf, gilt-ruled panels with various mottled effects, all edges gilt, rebacked with dark brown morocco, original spine label retained. Spine rubbed, a few chips, inner hinges relined with tape, marbled front pastedown but no marbled flyleaf. Armorial bookplate of Robert N. Pemberton and bookplate of T.H. Ellison to front pastedown. Underneath the Pemberton plate a piece of paper crossed through in ink, possibly patching a removed third bookplate. Latin annotation in an old hand to preliminary blank. ESTC calls for 22 pages of preliminaries but a number of copies, including those in St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle and others in libraries and sale records, have only 20 pages, being without the single-leaf 'Preface to the Reader'. This leaf, a singleton signed 'a', may have been more frequently omitted because the 'Catalogue of Authors' which would follow it is also signed 'a'. William Burton (1609-1657) is sometimes confused with another of the same name, the younger brother of Robert Burton and author of 'The Description of Leicestershire', but this Burton was more adept at philology. He died of palsy shortly before the completion of this work. ESTC R6432; Wing B6185   Ref: 49120 
£750
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Cardwell, Edward (ed.); Cranmer, Thomas. The Reformation of the Ecclesiastical Laws as Attempted in the Reigns of King Henry VIII, King Edward VI and Queen Elizabeth. Oxford University Press, 1850. 8vo., pp. lviii, 344, 36. Final 36 pages comprise a Clarendon Press publisher's list. Some pages unopened at top edge. Very occasional pencil underlining. Brown cloth, worn paper labels to spine, endcaps worn and frayed, sunned, corners bumped. Hinges cracked, some foxing to r.f.e.p.. Engraved bookplate to front paste-down with added ownership inscription of P.A. Slack and some pencil notations. 'A new edition' with an introduction in English and the original text of 1571 in Latin.   Ref: 41525  show full image..
£50
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Carlyle, Thomas: The Letters and Speeches of Oliver Cromwell. London: Methuen and Co., 1904. 3 vols., 8vo., pp. lxii, 523; xii, 557; xiii, 604. Title pages in red and black. Very light intermittent foxing. Green cloth, gilt. Spines sunned, head- and tail caps creased with small tears to vol. II. Tail edges uncut and foxed, dusting to head edge. Very good. Gift inscription to Sybil A. Lucas from Mr Claude Montefiore, Feb. 8th 1911 to f.f.e.p. vol. I. Ownership inscription of P.A. Slack, March 1973 in pencil to f.f.e.p. of each volume. The inscription notes that this set was a gift to Ms Lucas from the scholar and founder of Liberal Judaism Claude Montefiore (18581938), though we do not believe the handwriting to be his. His sister Alice married into the Lucas family, so Sybil was perhaps a relative of hers.   Ref: 41708 
£45
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Chadwick, John Nurse: Memorials of the Vicarage House & Garden, in South Lynn, Otherwise All Saints, Within the Borough of King's Lynn, Together with a List of the Vicars from the Earliest Times, and a Quantity of Other Useful Information. Illustrated by Four Engravings [...]. King's Lynn: printed by William Taylor, 1851. 8vo., pp. 64, [ii] + 4 plates. Sewing beginning to fail with some leaves loosening, occasional spots and smudges. Recent black cloth, gilt title to spine.   Ref: 52173 
£60
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Chadwick, Nora: The British Heroic Age: The Welsh and the Men of the North. Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1976. First edition. 8vo., pp. x, 126. A few neat annotations. Yellow paperback, spine toned and endcaps a little worn, some patchy fading to rear cover but still good and sound. Short note to Dr J.G.F. Hind loosely inserted.   Ref: 51981 
£45
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