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Berington, Joseph: The History of the Reign of Henry the Second, and of Richard and John, his Sons; with the Events of the Period, from 1154 to 1216. In which the Character of Thomas a Becket is vindicated from the Attacks of George Lord Lytttelton. Basil: printed and sold by J.J. Tourneisen, 1793. 3 vols., 8vo., pp.xl, 304; vi, 312; vi, 279, [ixx]. A little sporadic foxing slightly heavier towards front and rear of each volume, occasional light ink spots. Slightly later half marbled calf, beige morocco gilt labels to spines, marbled paper-covered boards. Lightly rubbed, edges a bit worn, corners fraying but very good overall. Ownership inscription 'Wulff' to ffep each volume, the first dated December 1860. Also to ffep of the first volume, a note in an old but indecipherable hand. First published in 1790. ESTC N7467   Ref: 48525 
£180
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Blackmore, Richard: Prince Arthur. An Heroick Poem. In ten books. London: Printed for Awnsham and John Churchil, 1695. First edition. Folio, pp. [xx], 296. Title within plain borders. A few light smudges, but internally bright and clean. Near-contemporary speckled calf, raised bands, paper label to second compartment with title inked in an old hand, blind tooled borders, edges sprinkled red. Loss to headcap, joints worn, calf split at upper joint but cords holding firm, a few light scuffs, edges worn, top corners bumped and fraying, endpapers split at hinges, patch of skinning to front paste-down likely fron the removal of a bookplate. A very good copy. Small library code inked to front paste-down. The first edition (the second followed the same year, and included an idex) of Richard Blackmore's (1654-1729) celebration of William III in the form of an epic based on The Aeneid using historical material from Geoffrey of Monmouth. King William rewarded Blackmore with the post of physician-in-ordinary. Blackmore was less successful with other poets, and is the target of particular scorn from Pope in The Dunciad and other satires. ESTC R23258.   Ref: 51084 
£750
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Blondel, David: (Davies, J., tr.:) A Treatise of the Sibyls, so highly celebrated, as well by the Antient Heathens, as the Holy Fathers of the Church; giving an accompt of the Names, and Number of the Sibyls, of their Qualities, the Form and Matter of their Verses; as also of the Books now Extant under their Names, and the Errours crept into Christian Religion, from the Impostures contained therein London, Printed by T[homas] R[oycroft] for the Authour, 1661. First edition thus. Small folio in 4s, pp. [iv], 293, [vii]. Some decorative intitials and head-pieces. Gutter between signatures A and B rather dusty, a few tiny scorchmarks and smudges scattered through, tip of bottom fore-edge corner torn from penultimate leaf but text unaffected. Contemporary brown sprinkled calf, raised bands, later brown gilt label to spine, blind-tooled borders and vertical line, edges lightly sprinkled red. Rubbed, joints cracking but binding holding firm, fairly deep horizontal scratch to upper board, a few small repairs to corners and edges, very good. Signature of 'Robe. Michell' in an old hand to head of p.1, small MS note and a little underlining to p.92. First English edition of this historical attack on the Sibylline Oracles, Judeo-Christian forgeries of ancient pagan prophesies which were traditionally seen in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance to foretell the coming of Christ. The Protestant clergyman and historian David Blondel (1591-1655) published this work in French, in 1649, and in the following year succeeded G.J. Vossius in the chair of history at the University of Amsterdam. Wing B 3220. ESTC R38842   Ref: 51140 
£450
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[Book of Common Prayer] Book of Common Prayer and Administration of the Sacraments and Other Rites and Ceremonies of the Church, According to the Use of the Church of England Together with the Psalter or Psalms of David, Pointed as they are to be Sung or Said in Churches. London: Engraven and Printed by the Permission of Mr Baskett, Printer to the King's most Excellent M 1717. 8vo., pp.xxii, 166, [ii]. Silverplate engraving throughout, with ornate borders, initials and decorations, and copious illustrations. Volvelle to p.v, single-page publisher's list to rear. Faint toning, volvelle repaired at point of attachment but functional. Recent brown morocco, raised bands, gilt spine with title, a.e.g., very good. 'The effect is harsh and dazzling in the extreme, and surely none but the most enthusiastic devotee ever yet prayed to heaven from the text of Sturt's prayer-book.' (Dibdin, Bibliographical Decameron p.116) Generally considered the most spectacular of Sturt's productions, the entire text is engraved rather than typeset, and is lavishly ornamented. Sturt (16581730) specialised in miniature work and was renowned for having engraved the Lord's Prayer in the space of a silver halfpenny and the Creed within that of a penny. Here his frontispiece portrait of King George I showcases this skill, being composed of the Creed, the Lord's Prayer, the Ten Commandments, a prayer for the royal family, and Psalm 21, all inscribed in lines of tiny characters across the King's profile. The overall effect disquiets Dibdin to a degree this cataloguer cannot recall seeing before, as he describes the miniscule text 'running horizontally and directly across the physiognomy of his Majesty. These sacred parts of our Liturgy were perhaps never before so unpicturesquely introduced.' He recovers his composure though, and admires the book's visual impact if not its practicality: 'The effect is harsh and dazzling in the extreme, and surely none but the most enthusiastic devotee ever yet prayed to heaven from the text of Sturt's prayer-book.' (Dibdin, Bibliographical Decameron p.116) Five variants are listed by the ESTC, this copy being that with a cherub-filled border to page v, and no numeral in the head margin. ESTC T141241   Ref: 51511  show full image..
£750
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Boswell, James: An Account of Corsica, the Journal of a Tour to that Island; and Memoirs of Pascal Paoli. Illustrated with a new and accurate map of Corsica. Glasgow: printed by Robert and Andrew Foulis for Edward and Charles Dilly, London, 1768. First edition. 8vo., pp. xxi, [iii], 382 + folding map (2nd state). Engraved vignette to title. Occasional very light offsetting, a few spots and smudges with p.1 a little foxed, map with repaired tear near gutter but no loss. Contemporary brown calf boards rebacked neatly but in a much lighter mustard shade, raised bands gilt ruled, burgundy and green morocco labels, plain double filet gilt borders, armorial gilt centrepiece of Londonderry Public Library to upper board. Rubbed, corners bumped particularly the top fore-edge corner of the upper board, endpapers a little toned at edges. A good, sound copy. Old MS library code to ffep verso. A number of variants exist, but in this copy: D2 is in its first state with 'John Home' after the first quotation; E2 and Z3 are cancels (with the correct spelling of Mariani on p.357 and 'Is-' at the end of line 11 on p.67); the last words of line 6, p.93 are "prince of" rather than the misspelling "prince fo"; line 18, p.296 are ends "of my own" rather than "my own of". First edition copy of Boswell's first substantial work, which was published in February of 1768. 'His meetings with Rousseau inspired Boswell to make a bold journey to Corsica [in 1764-5] to meet General Pasquale Paoli, leader of the insurgents seeking the island's independence from the Genoese [...] After a difficult inland journey he met and had conversations (22 to 27 October) in Sollacarò with Paoli, who at first suspected he was a spy, but who quickly came to like his improbable young visitor, saw an opportunity for promotion of the Corsican cause in Britain, and consented to a series of interviews. Boswell's trip was both arduous and dangerous. He suffered painfully from ingrowing toenails, the result of trudging long distances in inadequate boots, and he contracted malaria, but the experience none the less exhilarated him. He remarked in 1783: 'I had got upon a rock in Corsica and jumped into the middle of life' (Boswelliana, 328). [...] With its reports of the gallant islanders and a Plutarchan depiction of Paoli paralleled with several classical heroes, [An Account of Corsica] was an immediate success. The work was widely read and translated, stimulated great interest in Paoli and the Corsican cause, brought its author wide fame in Britain and Europe, and found an interested readership among the Americans. It attracted the notice of the French government (which had a translation made), and though Boswell's ambition for British intervention was not to be fulfilled, he probably influenced Britain's decision to send secret supplies of arms to the Corsicans.' (ODNB) ESTC T26157; Gaskell 473   Ref: 52306 
£600
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Boxhorn, Marc Zuerius: (Hartnack, Daniel, ed.:) Chronologia praecipuorum universi orbis imperiorum, regnorum, principatuum, rerumque, publicarum ortus, mutationes, atque occasus designans. Edita atque plurimis additionibus & continuatione usque in praesentem annum aucta a Daniele Hartnaccio [...] Budissae [Budissina]: impensis Friderici Arnstii, typis Johannis Rudolphi Leonis, 1688. Folio, pp. [iv], 251, [i] + 4 folding tables at rear. Title-page in red and black, a few woodcut ornaments. Lightly toned with occasional light foxing, title-page more heavily affected. Some paper repairs to the back of each plate, mostly to edges and attachments, plus a little foxing. Contemporary vellum, edges sprinkled blue. Vellum a bit grubby with a few spots and smudges, a little light foxing to endpapers and their hinges reinforced. A very good copy. To ffep, inscription of Ant. Johnson; to title-page, ex libris inscription possibly in the name of Grosvenor, dated April 26th 1805. Boxhorn (1612-1653), a politician and linguist, was in 1648 successor to Daniel Heinsius as Professor of History at the university of Leiden. Chronologia consists mainly of three-column tables showing important events in both world and church history set next to the reigning monarch of the time.   Ref: 52222 
£225
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[Brindley Classics] Nepos, Cornelius: Excellentium Imperatorum Vitae. London: J. Brindley, 1744. 12mo., pp. [xiv], 118, [x], title-page with engraved publisher's device. Woodcut tail-pieces, publisher's advertisement to final leaf. Sporadic foxing especially to endpapers. Contemporary dark terracotta morocco, gilt spine and borders with corner-pieces, a.e.g., marbled endpapers. Some loss to headcap, joints worn but holding firm, corners a bit rubbed but still very good overall. A mostly-erased pencil inscription to a preliminary blank, the name illegible but with Edinburgh and the date 23rd Oct. 1839 just visible. Typically attractive small-format edition of Cornelius Nepos from the press of John Brindley, who produced a long run of Latin authors in the same format. Brindley was bookseller to the Prince of Wales and was authorised to carry his insignia, which appears on the title-page.   Ref: 52203 
£65
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[Bristol] An Impartial History of the Late Riots at Bristol. London: printed for and sold by G.G.J. and J. Robinsons, Pater-noster Row; S. Hazard, Bookseller, Ba n.d. [1793], Pamphlet (225 x 140mm), pp. 16 (two gatherings). Stab-stitched, edges uncut. First and final leaves a little grubby and foxed but generally very good. Monogram inkstamp (E.B.) to title-page. A pamphlet concerning the Bristol Bridge Riot of 30th September 1793, which started as a protest against the renewal of an act which levied tolls on Bristol Bridge and proposed a new access road which necessitated the demolition of several houses near the bridge. In the resulting riot 11 people were killed and 45 injured, making it one of the worst massacres of the 18th century in England. The title-page is without a date, but October 1793 is given at the end of the text. ESTC T125833; Goldsmiths', 15763   Ref: 52187 
£300
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(Brome, Alexander:) A Collection of Loyal Songs Written Against the Rump Parliament: Between the Years 1639 and 1661. Containing a great variety of merry and diverting characters of the chief sectaries, who were the principal actors in that whole scene of affairs. With an historical introduction to the whole. London: Printed for J. Stone [...] 1731. 2 vols., 12mo., pp.[xiv], 264; [vi], 288. With woodcut initials, head- and tail-pieces. Each volume bound without its initial blank, very occasional light spots and smudges but generally very clean within. 19th-century deep maroon cross-grain morocco, spines ornately gilt with raised bands and title & volume labels, fine gold borders, corner tools and dentelles to each board, a.e.g., marbled endpapers. Raised bands slightly rubbed, upper joints a little worn and corners a little worn. A very good, attractively-bound set. Ink inscription to a preliminary blank, 'Simon / from Daddy. 1939.' Tiny inkstamp to each ffep verso, 'Bound by Lloyd, London'. An expanded edition of Brome's Ratts Rhimed to Death: Rump-Parliament hang'd up in the shambles, which first appeared (also anonymously) in 1660. 'Though he was a successful attorney, Brome's claim to fame derives from his avocation as poet. Between 1640 and 1660 Brome composed over 200 poems, including love poems in the cavalier mode, satires attacking the enemies of the king and, later, the Commonwealth government, drinking songs in the Anacreontic tradition, an assortment of occasional poems, translations of epigrams from the Greek and Latin, and other translations. Some of these poems were printed anonymously, while others appeared as dedications or in poetical miscellanies.' (ODNB) ESTC T145238 ; Lowndes 1593   Ref: 51879 
£200
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Browne, Thomas: Pseudodoxia Epidemica: or Enquiries into Very Many Received Tenents, and Commonly Presumed Truths. The Second Edition, Corrected and much Enlarged by the Author. Together with some Marginall Observations, and a Table Alphabeticall at the end. London: printed by A. Miller, for Edw. Dod and Nath. Ekins, at the Gunne in Ivie Lane, 1650. 2nd ed. Folio, pp. [xvi], 329, [xi]. Imprimatur to leaf B4, verso; woodcut initials and head- and tail-pieces. A few small annotations. Sporadic light dampstaining at gutter widening out, and then at bottom margin pp.65-84 and again pp.113-7. Occasional wax spots and ink smudges, small closed tear to gutter leaf C4 and leaf 2O, not affecting text. Contemporary dark brown calf, raised bands, plain triple-filet borders to boards. Rubbed with a few small patches of surface loss and faint marks, spine a bit creased, small repair to headcap, endpapers renewed, very good. To front paste-down, small bookplate of Robert Montgomery, Convoy (County Donegal) with crest and motto, and his ownership inscription to title-page. Also to the title-page, ownership inscriptions of: Josua Edisbury; Samson Archer; (Sam. or Dan.?) Law; Robt. Ball. The names appear almost as a list, and 'to' has been added between each to give a sense of the book being passed on. To head margin of p.121, inscription of Charles Archer dated 1717/1718. Josua Edisbury (d. c.1718) was educated at Brasenose College, Oxford (matriculated 1653) and became Sheriff of Denbighshire in 1682. Two years later he began building work on an ambitious new hall at Erdigg, running into severe financial trouble in the process. Robert Montgomery of Brandrim inherited an estate in Convoy from his cousin Sandy Montgomery in November of 1807. Pseudodoxia, first published in 1646, was Sir Thomas Browne's (16051682) most substantial work: 'almost an encyclopaedia of seventeenth-century misconceptions and new knowledge, Browne took up numerous false beliefs particularized in the Apology of George Hakewill; and, with a larger number of his own finding (some already mentioned in Religio medici), he put them in the framework suggested by Francis Bacon in his Advancement of Learning (as translated by Gilbert Watts, 1640) of "a calendar of falsehoods and of popular errors now passing unargued in natural history and in opinions, that sciences be no longer distempered and embased by them". Browne still had religious motives: to "repaire our primarie ruins" (I.5), the loss of Adam's universal knowledge of the natural world by the fall, and "to enforce the wonder of its Maker" (II.3), and theology as well as philosophy figure in the first book's systematic survey of the causes of error, from the fall of man, through logical and verbal misunderstanding, laziness, deference to antiquity and authority, to the wiles of the Devil. In the following six books, he subjects to "the three determinators of truth, Authority, Sense and Reason" (III.5) [...] a host of misbeliefs concerning the natural world, human physiology, pictorial representation, geography, history, biblical interpretation, and classical antiquity. While he records about a hundred personal experiments on subjects animal, vegetable, and mineral (ranging from amber, ants, and bitterns to toads, turkeys, and yew berries), he cites twelve times as many authors: in Certain Physiological Essays (1661) Robert Boyle accordingly respects him as both "the learned Dr Brown" and "so faithful and candid a Naturalist". The science and learning are sharpened with witty irony as Browne disposes of the "misapprehension, fallacy or false deduction, credulity, supinity, adherence unto Antiquity, Tradition and Authority" of two millennia, which have conceived a world of shrieking mandrakes, lopsided badgers, griffins, phoenixes, mermaids, ominous owls, the wandering Jew, Pope Joan, and Aeschylus brained by a tortoise, through to the last chapter, in which he points out a bright side to the all too believable account of necrophiliac embalmers in Egypt: "Surely, if such depravities there be yet alive, deformity need not despaire; nor will the eldest hopes be ever superannuated, since death hath spurres, and carcasses have beene courted" (VII.19).' (ODNB) ESTC R2160   Ref: 52270 
£600
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