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Florus, Lucius Annaeus L. Annaeus Florus. CL. Salmasius, addidit Lucium Ampelium, & cod. M.S. nunquam antehac editum. Lugd. Batav. [Leiden]: Apud Elzeviros, 1638. 12mo. pp. [viii], 290, [ii], [293-] 336, [xvi]. Engraved title, woodcut head- and tailpieces. Light red ink stain to upper outer blank corner of title and first two leaves, few leaves a trifle foxed. Near contemporary full calf, double gilt ruled, gilt fleurons to corners, spine gilt with fleurons and stars, gilt-lettered morocco label, inner edges gilt, a.e.g. Joints a bit cracked, lower with small worm hole. Bookplate of Faulque de Jonchieres to front pastedown, occasional annotations. Handsomely-bound copy of the better edition of the two printed by the Elzevirs in 1638. 'The preference is given to those copies where the two vignettes (one at the head of the dedicatory epistle, the other at that of the text of Florus) are different' (Dibdin II, 10). 'La plus jolie' (Willems 467), with the first headpiece in the shape of a mermaid. This copy belonged to Faulque de Jonquières (d.1873), librarian of the Ministère de la Marine. Dibdin II, 10; Willems 467.   Ref: 53175 
£200
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Froissart, Jean; De Commines, Philippe: Frossardus et Cominaeus Duo nobilissimi Gallicarum rerum scriptores. (I) Frossardi [...] Historiarum opus. (II) Philippus Cominaeus De rebus gestis a Ludovico & Carolo VIII. Amsterdami [Amsterdam]: Apud Ioan. et Corn. Blaeu, 1640. 12mo. 2 works in 1. pp. 203, [i]; [ii], [207-] 670, [xlviii]. General engraved title, separate titles for each work. Small marginal ink burn on p.589, pp. 209-12 misbound, ink mark to title. Contemporary English calf, triple blind ruled, spine gilt to a floral design, gilt-lettered morocco label. Joints and spine a bit cracked. Bookplate of John Rolle, 1st Baron Rolle, to front pastedown, his signature and monogram WW inked to flypaper. The two most famous accounts of 15th-century French history, by Jean Froissart and Philippe de Commines, in an exquisite, remarkably preserved, contemporary English binding. This copy was in the library of John Rolle (1750-1842), 1st Baron Rolle, a British MP supporting William Pitt the Younger. His attacks against Edmund Burke and Charles James Fox made him the target of the satire "The Rolliad". Not in Brunet.   Ref: 53160 
£250
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Gale, Roger (ed.:) Registrum Honoris de Richmond exhibens terrarum & villarum quae quondam fuerunt Edwini comitis infra Richmundshire descriptionem: ex libro Domesday in thesauria domini regis: [...]. Londini [London: ] Impensis R. Gosling, 1722. Large paper copy. Folio, pp. [ii], xxxv, [i], 106, [xxvi], 286, [xxx] + folding engraved map and 15 other engraved plates (7 folding). Lacking the list of subscribers leaf. Title and many pages in red and black. Spotted and lightly browned. Early 19th century marbled boards, scuffed, with spine renewed in half reversed calf by John Henderson c.1980. The Bowyer ledgers show 50 large paper copies were printed, of this last significant publication by Roger Gale (1672-1744), the eldest son of the antiquary Thomas Gale. The text is "a twelfth-century register of the honour of Richmond from the Cotton Library, accompanied by a long appendix of important early charters. It was published in 1722 under the auspices of the Society of Antiquaries, of which he was the first vice-president" (ODNB). ESTC T150024.   Ref: 53037 
£350
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Gellius, Aulus: Noctes Atticae. Editio nova et prioribus omnibus doctis hominis cura multo castigatior. Amstelodami [Amsterdam]: apud Ludovicum Elzevirium, 1651. Editio Nova. 12mo. [48], 498, [124]. Small clean tear to lower blank margin of F10, another three on K12, V3-4 touching text. Contemporary vellum over boards, yapp edges, title inked to spine (modern), all edges sprinkled blue. Spine little rubbed. Ex-libris of Rudolph Apfelbeck 1883 to ffep. 'The first two editions from the Elzevir press [of which this is the first] were carefully published by J.F. Gronovius.' (Dibdin) 'Fort jolie et qui passe pour tres correcte' (Willems) Dibdin I, 340; Pokel, 101; Schweiger II, 378; Willems, 1127.   Ref: 53177 
£175
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[Girard, Guillaume]; Cotton, Charles (trans.): The History of the Life of the Duke of Espernon, the Great Favourite of France. [...] In Three Parts, Containing Twelve Books. Wherein the history of France is continued from the year 1598. where D'Avila leaves off, down to our own times, 1642. London: printed by E. Cotes, and A. Clark, for Henry Brome, 1670. Folio (in 4s), pp. [xx], 190, [ii], 191-416, [ii], 417-651, [i] + 2 portrait frontispieces. Separate title to-page to each part; with the advertisement at foot of p.651 (a variant lacks this advertisement). Title-page in red and black, woodcut initials and head- and tail-pieces. Occasional light spots and foxing, 2 short closed tears to margins of first portrait and a few neat paper repairs to other margins, some faint ink spatters plus a more significant blot to p.232 affecting but not obscuring a few words. 20th-century library binding, quarter dark blue morocco with blue cloth boards, gilt title to spine, edges coloured red, marbled endpapers. A very good copy in a sturdy recent binding. Ink stamps (various styles) of Inner Temple Library to: each frontis, verso; to title-page x3; A2 recto; pages 1, 223, 650, 651 and final leaf verso. Armorial bookplate of Herbert Jacob Esq. of St Stephens, Kent to title-page verso. Herbert Jacob (d.1725) was the son of Sir Abraham Jacob of Dover and inherited his estate, St Stephen's alias Hackington in Canterbury. 'This gentleman, who was bred to the bar, and proved a very efficient magistrate in this county, by his will left a considerable collection of books to the society of the Inner Temple, of which he was a bencher.' (Ireland, England's Topographer) Attributed by Halkett & Laing (2nd ed.) to Guillaume Girard (d.1663), the Duc d'Espernon's secretary who first published his Histoire de la Vie du Duc d'Espernon in 1655. The Duke was a courtier and favourite of Henri III, but was later implicated in the assassination of Henri IV. His Life includes a great deal of information about French history from 1570 until his death in 1642. ESTC R21918   Ref: 52221 
£225
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(Goodwin, Thomas:) The History of the Reign of Henry the Fifth, King of England, &c. In Nine Books. London: printed by J.D. for S. and J. Sprint, J. Robinson, J. Taylor, Andr. Bell, T. Ballard, and B. 1704. Folio, pp. viii, 256, 267-272, 257-266, 273-362 + portrait frontispiece. Preface bound before dedication; pp. 267-272 (i.e. leaves MM2-4) bound out of order, but all present. The appendix has a separate titlepage, with the date 1703. A few neatly pencilled marginal notes. Frontis and title both lightly toned and a bit dusty, odd spots of foxing becoming heavy by final two leaves. Slightly later tan calf, neatly rebacked, raised bands, gilt spine, black title label, blind-tooled border, corners repaired, marbled edges, endpapers renewed. A little scuffed, some smudgy marks, a very good copy. Goodwin's work is beginning to be recognised by modern historians as an important and in some respects innovative early contribution to the historical reputation of Henry V. "Goodwin's study marked a milestone in the study of the reign of Henry V... The chief contrast between Goodwin's work and that of earlier writers on Henry V lies in the broader picture he drew of what kingship was about and, consequently, by what criteria a king might be judged... The history of a reign, as understood and presented by Goodwin, went far beyond the language and 'deeds' (Acta or Gesta) of a single man. It was the history of a national enterprise, guided and led by the king. Although historians may differ today over interpretations regarding this question or that, this success or that failure, and in particular over their understanding of the king's character, that is still, in essence, how we see his reign today." (Allmand). Please see 'Writing History in the Eighteenth Century: Thomas Goodwin's The History of the Reign of Henry the Fifth (1704)', Christopher Allmand's very interesting chapter in Henry V: New Interpretations (2013) for a great deal more information on the scope and innovations of Goodwin's work. ESTC T90148   Ref: 53036 
£500
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Gratius (or Grattius) Faliscus: (Wase, Christopher, trans.:) Cynegeticon. Or, A Poem of Hunting by Gratius the Faliscian. Englished and illustrated by Christopher Wase Gent [...]. (London:) Charles Adams, 1654. 12mo., pp. [xciv], 86. Latin text and English translation on facing pages, the latter verso. Some light dust soiling, heavier on title and verso of last leaf, browning mostly to margins and occasional spots. 19th century half calf over marbled boards, gilt-lettered morocco label. Joints and extremities rubbed, small repair at head and foot. 20th century inscription to front pastedown, later monogram RC inked to title. The first edition in English of this poem on hunting by a contemporary of Virgil and Ovid. The translator's commentary includes chapters on "the styles of hunting different from the English, both antique and forreigne" and "the modern authors who have written upon this subject." The first edition in Latin had been published in Lyon by Sebastian Gryphius in 1537. Wing G1581; ESTC R1966; Schwerdt I, p.217.   Ref: 53093 
£750
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[Greek Letters] Graecorum veterum selectae ac breves Epistolae. Romae [Rome]: Apud Aloisium Zanettum, 1604. 16mo, pp. 54, [2, blank], 68, [2, blank]. Later vellum, boards bordered with a double gilt fillet, spine infilled with gilt pallets, black morocco label, edges red. Some browning and spotting, top margin occasionally shaved just touching the page number. Vellum somewhat darkened and label a little chipped. Armorial bookplate of the Syston Park library (cut down to fit) to front pastedown. A rare reprint of a collection of excerpts from ancient Greek letters, with following Latin translation, originally published by Morel in Paris several decades earlier and often reprinted; it was almost certainly in regular use as a schoolbook. The epistolary selections are in this edition followed by (though no mention is made on the title-page) the sayings of the seven sages (i.e. Thales, Solon, Cleobulus, et al). Worldcat locates only one copy, at the Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale in Rome, though there is also a copy in the Deutsches Archaeologisches Institut.   Ref: 53232 
£500
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[Hale, Matthew:] A Letter from Sr. Matthew Hale, Kt. Sometime Lord Chief Justice of England To one of his Sons After his Recovery from the Small-Pox. London: Printed by J. Playford, for W. Shrowsbery at the Sign of the Bible in Duke-Lane, 1684. 8vo., pp. [ii], 37, [i]. Some faint smudgy marks to title-page, light foxing to final leaf. Contemporary Cambridge-style panelled calf, neatly rebacked, a little blind tooling to spine. A few slight scrapes and chips, corners a bit worn with the upper fore-edge corner of the rear board beginning to fray, endpapers toned and a little fragile at edges, still very good. At head of title-page, the inscription of the bibliophile Brent Gration-Maxfield (1916-1983), whose collection was sold by Sotheby's in London across several auctions in the early 1980's. Large armorial bookplate of 'The Hon. George Baillie Esq., one of the Lords of the Treasury' dated 1724, and signed 'A. Johnston sculp.'. Baillie (16641738) was a Scottish landowner and politician who was appointed to the Treasury board that had been formed upon the resignation of Robert Walpole in 1717. He was ousted in 1725 (though with a healthy pension equal to his salary). His wife was Lady Grisell Baillie (16651746), daughter of Patrick Hume and one of the heroic subjects of Henry Grey Graham's A Group of Scottish Women (1908). 'Hale (16091676) left a place in national memory as the type of the virtuous lawyer and the incorruptible judge. [...] Hale has continuously enjoyed the reverence of lawyers as the greatest Stuart jurist after Coke, and treatments of his place in legal history have virtually always been tinged with piety. In non-professional eyes Hale's reputation has been less consistent. Down to the early nineteenth century, his short religious tracts were recommended as edifying reading, no doubt because the point about these works was not their content but their authorship. Since then, the fact that such a man was also an exemplary protestant Christian has lost apologetic usefulness. During the twentieth century the best-known episode in Hale's career was undoubtedly his role in trying witches. This has usually been treated, given Hale's learning and his character, as a striking indication of the blindness of his age, although a more recent tradition has traced the aberration to his own misogyny. In Arthur Miller's play The Crucible, the clerical expert on witchcraft is called Hale.' (ODNB) ESTC R228016; Wing H247A   Ref: 52383 
£600
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[Hale, Matthew:] Burnett, Gilbert: The Life and Death of Sir Matthew Hale, Kt. Sometime Lord Chief; Justice of His Majesties Court of Kings Bench. London: printed for William Shrowsbery, at the Bible in Duke-Lane, 1682. 8vo., pp. [xx], 218, including portrait frontispiece (carefully laid down). Wing states that this edition is found in two variants: this copy has 'he' as the catchword on p.3, rather than 'while'. Woodcut initials. Single MS note to p.15 supplying a correction from the errata. Small lacuna to fore-edge margin of b2, not affecting text. Occasional light smudges. Very neatly executed recent period-style binding, brown calf, raised bands and gilt title to spine, blind-tooled Cambridge boards, endpapers renewed. Corners very slightly rubbed, a little toning to endpapers, very good indeed. Small oval inkstamp to frontispiece. Ownership inscription of Henry Currer to title-page, in an old hand. 'Hale (16091676) left a place in national memory as the type of the virtuous lawyer and the incorruptible judge. This image was cemented by Gilbert Burnet's hagiography, The Life and Death of Sir Matthew Hale (1682), a book that soon achieved a classic status. The date of this work's composition at a period of royalist reaction made Burnet relatively reticent about his hero's brand of politics. The balance was somewhat redressed by Baxter's remarks in his Additional Notes on the Life and Death of Sir Matthew Hale (1682), which stressed Hale's sympathy for the dissenters, and by the account of their friendship in the posthumous Reliquiae Baxterianae (1696).' (ODNB) ESTC R215370; Wing B5828   Ref: 52382 
£300
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