Antiquarian Booksellers Association
Unsworth's Booksellers
International League of Antiquarian Booksellers

Dorson, Richard M. (ed.): Peasant Customs and Savage Myths. Selections from the British Folklorists. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul Ltd., 1968. 2 vols. 8vo. Cloth, very good. Dustwrapper, price-clipped, rubbing to extremities, very good.   Ref: 32090 
£20
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Dugdale, William: The Baronage of England, or An Historical Account of the Lives and Most Memorable Actions of Our English Nobility [...] London: Printed by Tho. Newcomb, for Abel Roper, John Martin, and Henry Herringman, 1675-6. First edition. 3 vols. in 2, folio. pp. [xii], 476, 497-790, [ii] + 5 folding plates; [viii], 312, 361-488, [iv] (pagination as called for). Title pages in red and black, a few woodcut initials. Each plate is a folding pedigree (Percy, Talbot, Clifford, Berkley and D'Arcie). A few neat marginal notes in both pencil and ink, all in old hands. A few occasional faint spots and smudges but generally bright within, a few small and unobstrusive paper repairs. 19th-century tan (or 'citron') polished calf, rebacked in a slightly lighter shade with raised bands, gilt, brown and tan morocco gilt title labels. Gilt borders and dentelles, a.e.g., marbled endpapers with reinforced cloth hinges. A few tiny scrapes to boards, very good copies overall. Housed in a tan cloth slipcase. Armorial bookplate of Gerald Gascoigne Lynde (1873-1938) to front paste-down of each volume. Directly below, a small label printed with the arms of William Amhurst Tyssen Amherst (18351909), created first Baron Amherst of Hackney in 1892. 'Collecting books and antiquities was Tyssen-Amhurst's chief interest, and he gathered a library rich in ecclesiastical history, especially of the Reformation and the Church of England, and in editions of the English Bible (of which his collection was inferior only to that of Lord Ashburnham). Equally strong was his interest in the history of the spread of printing, and historic bookbindings. He bought steadily from the 1860s, often in friendly rivalry with the earl of Carysfort, and had the benefit in the saleroom of the regular agency of Bernard Quaritch. His library included seventeen Caxtons, in its day one of the two or three best collections in private hands, and his early printed books illustrated the spread of typography in practically every European country. He was a member of the Roxburghe Club [...]. A detailed catalogue of Tyssen-Amherst's collection was in preparation by the distinguished bibliographer Seymour De Ricci, who gratefully recorded that he owed to Tyssen-Amherst's 'kind lessons in English bibliography my own earliest interest in that difficult science'. However, owing to the dishonesty of Charles Cheston, the solicitor entrusted with the administration of Tyssen-Amherst's estate and trust funds, a sale of the library at Didlington proved urgently necessary. De Ricci's catalogue raisonné had to be reduced to a much abbreviated (though still substantial) hand-list, speedily produced for private circulation in 1906. A major sale by Sothebys was organized: its two sections commenced on 3 December 1908 and 24 March 1909, and the total realised was £32,592.' (ODNB) These volumes appear as item 1081 in De Ricci's Hand-List (described as 'very fine') and as Lot 303 in Sotheby's catalogue (a clipping from which is pasted to the ffep verso). Bound by the notable English bookbinder Francis Bedford (17991883), who was patronised by William Bentinck, 4th Duke of Portland and various other aristocratic book collectors who saw his 'antique' style as befitting the importance of their libraries. Bedford's Atheneum obituary notes the derivative nature of his style, but praises his high level of skill as a binder, restorer and repairer of books. "A history of the aristocracy and its deeds since Anglo-Saxon times, an immense work of genealogical scholarship derived from sound sources that retains its value to the present day [...] Editions of Dugdale's work continued to appear after his death as scholars polished and quarried his researches. His place in the annals of historical scholarship is an honourable one. His speciality was the retrieval of factual information relating to the great institutions of the middle ages: the monasteries, the legal system, and the aristocracy. The scale of his operations was greater than any previous endeavour, and its achievements were astonishing, especially in view of the disorder of the records from which he worked. " (ODNB). ESTC R16723, R225614; Wing D 2480; Brunet II 868; Lowndes 691; Moule CCLXXIV.   Ref: 51874 
£1000
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Dugdale, William: (Wright, James, ed. & trans.:) Monasticon Anglicanum, or, the History of the Ancient Abbies, and other Monasteries, Hospitals, Cathedral and Collegiate Churches in England and Wales. With divers French, Irish and Scotch Monasteries formerly relating to England. London: Printed for Sam. Keble [...] 1693. First edition. 3 vols. in 1. Folio, pp. [xii], 331, [xiii] + 15 plates. Title in red and black, woodcut intitials. Title-page and first plate ('A Benedictine Monk') both trimmed and laid down, leaves A5 & A6 repaired at gutter, light dampstain to lower half of plates, occasional spots and smudges, final gatherings a little toned. Late 18th or early 19th-century tan tree calf, red morocco label and a little gilt to spine, edges lightly sprinkled red. Board edges rubbed, corners wearing, a very good copy overall. Pencilled bookseller's note to front paste-down, monogram inked to ffep. Copious annotations in two old hands: one leaving marginal comments, the other cross referencing. The cross-referencing hand also leaves a bibliographical note to a preliminary blank, numbers the plates, and writes at the head of the final plate, 'These 15 plates are neither numbered nor placed regularly'. The first English epitome of Dugdale's great work; the Monasticon was originally published in three volumes Latin in 1655-73. James Wright (1643-1713) was a barrister at Middle Temple and a significant antiquarian himself, author of an important history of Rutland which he produced with Dugdale's encouragement. He dedicates the work to William Bromley of Warwickshire (1664-1732): "Warwickshire has certainly produced two of the most famous and deserving Writers, in their several ways, that England can boast of; a Dugdale, and a Shakespear, both Williams; a name that has been of eminent Grace to this County in many instances: nor will it ever cease to be so while you are living" (2nd leaf verso). ESTC R8166; Wing D 2487B; Lowndes 685-6.   Ref: 51727 
£600
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Ellis, Henry: A General Introduction to Domesday Book; Accompanied by Indexes of the Tenants in Chief, and Under Tenants, at the Time of the Survery [...] London: Frederick Muller, 1971. 2 vols. Facsimile reprint, 8vo., pp.[iv], xix, [i], 515, [i]; [iv], 543, [i]. Black cloth, gilt titles to spines. Edges dusty, a few small dusty marks to boards but very good overall. Facsimile reprint of the 1833 edition printed 'By Command of his Majesty King William IV, Under the Direction of the Commissioners on the Public Records of the Kingdom.'   Ref: 51558 
£24
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[English Civil War] To the High and Honourable Court of Parliament, the Humble Petition of the University of Oxford, in Behalfe of Episcopacy and Cathedral. (London: s.n.,) 1641. Small 4to., pp. [ii], 6 + several gatherings of binder's blanks. Final leaf dated 'Dat XXIV. Apr. An. Dom. M.DC.XLI.' Neatly repaired closed tears near gutter of each leaf with a little infilling to first and final leaves but not affecting text, title-page slightly grubby, three tiny holes (paper flaws?) to fore-edge margin of last two leaves. Late 19th-century marbled paper-covered boards, gilt morocco label to spine, edges sprinkled red and blue. Paper split at joints with a few small chips but binding firm, edges worn, very good. Small label of James Parker & Co. 27, Broad Street, Oxford to front paste-down. A second pamphlet, An answer to the petition sent from the Universitie of Oxford to the honourable court of Paliament, was published in the same year. ESTC R23315; Wing O986   Ref: 50679 
£300
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Farrar, Clarissa P. and Evans, Austin P.: Bibliography of English Translations from Medieval Sources. New York: Columbia University Press, 1946. 8vo., pp. xiii, 534. Green cloth, gilt; dusty, a little worn and faded. Very good. 'Borough of Dagenham' Library stickers and markings to spine and front endpapers.   Ref: 49179 
£15
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Faull, Margaret L. and Stinson, Marie, (eds.): Domesday Book 30. Yorkshire, Parts One and Two. Chichester: Phillimore, 1986. 8vo., with maps and corrigenda pages. Red cloth, gilt titles to spines. Small dent to headcap Part One, top edges a little dusty, very good indeed. Red dust-jackets, lightly shelf worn, very good. In the History from the Sources series. Translated from the original Domesday Book of 1086.   Ref: 52146 
£20
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Firth, Charles; Davies, Godfrey: The Regimental History of Cromwell's Army. Oxford: the Clarendon Press, 1940. First edition. 2 vols., 8vo., pp. xxxvi, 397; vii, 398-768. Blue cloth, gilt titles to spines. Very slight shelf-wear, and edges dust-marked, but a very good set, Ownership inscriptions of (Professor) Robert Ashton to front paste-downs.   Ref: 45139 
£70
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Fitch, Robert: (Ninham, John, illus.:) Views of the Gates of Norwich, Made in the Years 1792-3, by the Late John Ninham, With an Historical Introduction, Extracts from the Corporation Records and Papers of the Late John Kirkpatrick. Norwich: printed by Cundall, Miller, and Leavins, 1861. 4to., pp.[iv], xxxv, [i], 36 + 22 plates as called for. Some foxing mostly affecting plates. Brown textured cloth, gilt title to spine, gilt-stamped centrepiece of the Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society to upper board. Cloth split and fraying at lower joint but mull beneath holding firm, endcaps worn, spine faded, a few marks to boards but still a good copy. Several bookplates and inscriptions to front endpapers: bookplates of John J. Nunn and T.J.W. Cushing; inscriptions of D.H. Cushing and (Sambrooke?) Taylor, the latter dated 1920. One additional illegible ownership inscription at head of ffep, the only readable part being 'Burnham Market'.   Ref: 49037 
£100
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Flood, Henry: The Speech and Proposition of the Right Hon. Henry Flood, in the House of Commons of Great Britain, Thursday, March 4th, 1790, on a Reform of the Representation in Parliament. London: J. Debrett, 1790. 8vo., pp. [iv], 32. Title-page a little grubby, faint stain to fore-edge margin of a few leaves. Disbound, buff paper covers a little rubbed, a few small tears to spine but still a very good copy. Flood (17321791) 'was certainly one of the most consequential figures on the Irish political landscape and one of the most powerful voices of eighteenth-century Irish protestant patriotism during the 1760s and early 1770s, when he dominated patriot politics, and during the early 1780s, when he was the most provocative patriot spokesman.' Made in the year before his death, 'his speech for leave to introduce a bill for the reform of parliament on 4 March 1790 indicate[s] that he retained his fabled oratorical and political skills to the last.' (ODNB) ESTC T178279   Ref: 51462 
£45
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