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(Dickinson, Edmund:) Delphi Phoenicizantes sive, Tractatus, in quo Græcos, quicquid apud Delphos celebre erat, (seu Pythonis & Apollinis historiam, seu poeanica certamina, & præmia, seu priscam templi formam atque inscriptionem seu tripodem, oraculum, &c. spectes) è josuæ historiâ, scriptisqu Oxoniae [Oxford]: excudebat H. Hall Academiae Typographus, impensis Ric. Davis, 1655. First edition. Small 8vo. (145 x 90mm), pp. [xxxviii], 42, 41-56, 59-142, [xviii], 40, [x]. Usual mispagination. Woodcut initials and head-pieces, title-page bordered with ornamental type. A little worming to gutter margin near head from about p.127 onwards, small scorch-hole to G6 affecting a marginal note, occasional light foxing. Contemporary vellum, title (recently) inked to spine. Upper board warped, split at joint and very nearly off, just holding on at tail of spine. Vellum grubby, endpapers toned. Internally good, but would benefit from a binder's attention. First edition copy of the first published work of Edmund Dickinson (1624–1707), physician and alchemist. 'At Oxford Dickinson became proficient in many languages, including Greek, Hebrew, and Arabic—languages which occur in all his major publications. These languages were the key to his first book, Delphi Phoenicizantes (1655), a philological and etymological attempt to show that Greek stories of Delphos and Apollo's battle with the Python were derived from Hebrew accounts of Joshua, and that Bacchus and Hercules were based on Moses and Joshua. The volume also contains notions about Noah's arrival in Italy, and the origin of the druids. This work made Dickinson widely known both at home and abroad. Wood (Ath. Oxon., 2.90–91) claims that the true author of this work was Henry Jacob, a Mertonian ejected at the 1648 visitation. According to Wood, Jacob left the completed manuscript in a locked book-chest, but his quarters were later given to Dickinson, who took possession of the chest and published the manuscript under his own name. There is no clear evidence for this assertion, and Wood was ill-disposed towards Dickinson, owing to a £70 fine for the renewal of the lease on his family house, the imposition of which he blamed on Dickinson, then (1664) bursar of Merton.' (ODNB) ESTC R8623   Ref: 51875 
£225
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Dictys Cretensis: [Dares Phrygius:] [Joseph of Exeter:] (Smids, L., ed.:) De Bello et Excidio Trojanae, in usum Serenissimi Delphini [...] accedunt in hac nova editione notae variorum integrae; nec non Josephus Iscanus, cum notis Sam. Dresemii. Numismatibus & Gemmis, Historiam illustrantibus exornavit Lud. Smids, M.D. Dissertationem de Dictye Cretensi Amstelaedami [Amsterdam]: Apud Georgium Gallet, 1702. 8vo., pp. [lxxxiv], 177, [lxxv], 54, [22], 168, [viii], including 1 engraved frontispiece as part of the first gathering + 1 additional engraved frontispiece and 6 further plates. Includes final errata leaf. Title page in red and black, engraved head-pieces, woodcut decorations. Occasional light spotting, a few faint smudgy marks. Contemporary vellum, raised bands, title inked to spine, blind-tooled border, frame and centrepiece to each board, edges sprinkled blue and red. A little grubby, a few small marks to boards (possibly wax?), free endpapers very lightly toned at edges, very good overall. Small MS inscription of William R. Lyall to head of title-page. William Rowe Lyall (1788–1857) was Dean of Canterbury from 1845 until his death. He was the younger brother of Gerorge Lyall (1778/9–1853), MP for the City of London and chairman of the East India Company. The Delphin edition of three Latin poems on the Trojan war, by the pseudonymous authors 'Dictys of Crete' (4th-cent.) and 'Dares of Phrygia' (5th/6th-cent.), and by the English monk and crusader Joseph of Exeter (d.1224), they are evidence for the continuity of the Homeric legends through the Latin Middle Ages. Basing his edition of Dictys and Dares on Anne Dacier's Delphin edition of 1680, with notes also from an edition of Strassburg, 1691, the editor Ludolf Smids has added numismatic illustrations and his own commentary, and an essay by Jacobus Perizonius (1651-1715). The text and commentary for Joseph of Exeter are from an edition of Frankfurt, 1623 (cf. Schweiger). Schweiger II 332.   Ref: 51906 
£325
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Diderot, Denis: Mémoirs sur Différens Sujets de Mathématiques. Paris: chez Durand [...] Pissot [...], 1748. First edition. 8vo., pp. vi, [vi], 243, [i] + 7 folding plates. Title-page vignette, initials and headpieces, further illustrations in the text. A few page corners slightly creased, occasional light spots and marginal dampstains, small marginal scorchmark to leaf N8, Plate 5 with closed tear neatly repaired to verso. Contemporary mottled sheep, gilt spine with reddish title label, endcaps and corners neatly repaired, edges coloured red, marbled endpapers unobtrusively repaired at hinge. Spine and joints a bit worn, a few small stains and scrapes to boards, some minor dents to edges. A very good copy overall. Small monogram (initials possibly M and C) inked in an old hand to ffep verso. First edition copy of the scientific work of which Diderot (1713-1784) was most proud. Mémoirs sur Différens Sujets de Mathématiques contains his original ideas on acoustics, tension, and air resistance. He also describes "a project for a new organ" playable by all. The remarkable Lettre sur les aveugles à l'usage de ceux qui voient was published anonymously in Paris in June of the following year, and despite suppression by the authorities marked Diderot's introduction to the world one of its great original thinkers.   Ref: 51835 
£600
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Drexel, Jeremias: Recta intentio omnium humanarum actionum amussis. [bound with:] Gymnasium Patientiae. Col. Agrippinae [Cologne]: Apud Corn. ab Egmund, 1634. 16mo., pp. [xiv] 416 [ii]; [xiv] 387 [iii] + engraved title pages in each book. Two further full-page engravings in the text of each book. The edge of first three leaves a bit creased. Contemporary vellum boards, long sides overlapping, spine lettered in ink, ties removed, somewhat soiled, pastedowns torn. Ownership inscription of Jacobus van Aker D'heysbroeck to f.f.e.p. recto and A. Domis (1802) to verso. Two works by the Jesuit writer Jeremias Drexel (or Drexelius, 1581-1638). The first has been called a prelude to his most famous work, the 'Heliotropum', while the second, the 'Gymnasium of Patience', comprises arguments for Christian acceptance of suffering. The imprint is usually considered to be false, with the books printed by Blaeu in Amsterdam. VD17 32:709942B; VD17 1:075296S.   Ref: 29953 
£350
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Dugdale, William: (Wright, James, ed. & trans.:) Monasticon Anglicanum, or, the History of the Ancient Abbies, and other Monasteries, Hospitals, Cathedral and Collegiate Churches in England and Wales. With divers French, Irish and Scotch Monasteries formerly relating to England. London: Printed for Sam. Keble [...] 1693. First edition. 3 vols. in 1. Folio, pp. [xii], 331, [xiii] + 15 plates. Title in red and black, woodcut intitials. Title-page and first plate ('A Benedictine Monk') both trimmed and laid down, leaves A5 & A6 repaired at gutter, light dampstain to lower half of plates, occasional spots and smudges, final gatherings a little toned. Late 18th or early 19th-century tan tree calf, red morocco label and a little gilt to spine, edges lightly sprinkled red. Board edges rubbed, corners wearing, a very good copy overall. Pencilled bookseller's note to front paste-down, monogram inked to ffep. Copious annotations in two old hands: one leaving marginal comments, the other cross referencing. The cross-referencing hand also leaves a bibliographical note to a preliminary blank, numbers the plates, and writes at the head of the final plate, 'These 15 plates are neither numbered nor placed regularly'. The first English epitome of Dugdale's great work; the Monasticon was originally published in three volumes Latin in 1655-73. James Wright (1643-1713) was a barrister at Middle Temple and a significant antiquarian himself, author of an important history of Rutland which he produced with Dugdale's encouragement. He dedicates the work to William Bromley of Warwickshire (1664-1732): "Warwickshire has certainly produced two of the most famous and deserving Writers, in their several ways, that England can boast of; a Dugdale, and a Shakespear, both Williams; a name that has been of eminent Grace to this County in many instances: nor will it ever cease to be so while you are living" (2nd leaf verso). ESTC R8166; Wing D 2487B; Lowndes 685-6.   Ref: 51727 
£600
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Echard, Laurence: The Roman History, From the Restitution of the Empire by Charles the Great, to the Taking of Constantinople by the Turks. Containing the Space of 653 Years. Vol. V and Last. London: printed for R. and J. Bonwicke, J. Tonson, J. Walthoe, R.Wilkin, and T. Ward, 1726. Volume V only. Fifth edition. 8vo., pp. [x], 425, [vii] + additional engraved title-page. Title-page in red and black, woodcut head-piece to first page. Occasional faint spots and smudges but very good within. Slightly later dark brown speckled calf, red gilt morocco label to spine, raised bands with gilt, plain gilt borders, edges sprinkled red. Spine rubbed, a few small tears to head-cap, edges a bit worn, very good. Armorial bookplate of St Andrew, Ld. St John of Bletso to front paste-down. This is likely the 14th Baron St John of Bletso (1759–1817), but could be his son of the same name (1811–1874). The fifth volume of Echard's History, which stands alone as a work of medieval history. Echard (bap. 1672, d. 1730) was an enormously prolific writer. His most important work is considered to be his Roman History, 'the first in English, dedicated to the lord keeper of the great seal, Sir John Sommers, which attained ten editions by 1734 and was twice issued in French. The work was designed to be 'particularly useful to young Students and Gentlemen' (preface). There was, as one would expect, a heavy emphasis on moralizing, following the Sallustian model. It is a smooth narrative, without clash of sources, although Echard revealed an interesting preference for Greek sources over Livy, who was declared 'a little too verbose and circumstantial' (ibid.). Echard's political interpretations were conservative: blame the tribunes. He was, in general, an apologist for Roman imperialism, save for the obliteration of Carthage. He was under the spell of Caesar, and then of Octavian-Augustus. Strangely, he used only literary sources, neglecting inscriptions, coins, and archaeological evidence. G. Cornewall Lewis grouped Echard among the 'unenquiring and uncritical' (Enquiry into the Credibility of the Early Roman History, 2 vols., 1855, 1.4). In an age of raging Pyrrhonism, Echard was certainly very conservative. Yet his history held the field in English until Hooke (1738) and Ferguson (1783). A continuation of it was the first imperial inspiration of the young Gibbon [...] Echard's history remained the standard one until replaced by Hume (who does not seem to mention him) and Macaulay (who cites him frequently).' (ODNB) ESTC N26349   Ref: 51718 
£95
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Erasmus, Desiderius: Adagiorum [...] Epitome. Amstelodami [Amsterdam]: apud Ludovicum Elzevirium, 1650. First edition thus. 12mo., pp. [xxiv], 622, [lxxii]. Title-page in red and black with woodcut printer's device, woodcut initials and head-pieces. Occasional very tiny pencil annotations. Contemporary brown calf boards with triple-fillet blind tooled borders, rebacked in lighter sheep with gilt title label and blind tooling, edges coloured red, endpapers renewed. Spine very much rubbed but sound, corners worn. A good working copy. Inscription to a front endpaper, 'Frederico Bond. / Coll. Exon. Oxon. Socis. / D.D. / (?) / J.W. Maxwell Lyte'. This is likely John Walker Maxwell Lyte (1823-1848) who matriculated at New College, Oxford in 1843. His own life was short, but he has the distinction of a both notable father and a notable son: his father was the author and clergyman Henry Francis Lyte (1793–1847), writer of 'Abide With Me'; his only child was Henry Churchill Maxwell Lyte (1848–1940), who was for 40 years the Deputy Keeper of Public Records, a role he fulfilled with great innovation and vigour. Rev. Frederick Hookey Bond (1821-1897) is a likely candidate for 'Frederico Bond'. He matriculated at Exeter College in 1839, was awarded B.A. in 1843 and M.A. in 1845. He was headmaster of Marlborough Royal Free Grammar School from 1853 to 1876. His son, Frederick Bligh Bond (1864–1945), was an architect, author, and famous psychical researcher. First Elzevir edition of the epitome text of the Adagia, Erasmus' annotated collection of Greek and Latin proverbs. The first full edition, Collectanea Adagiorum, was published in Paris in 1500 and contained about eight hundred entries. By the time of his death in 1536, Erasmus had expanded the work to 4,151 entries, many with richly detailed notes and commentaries. Willems 1109   Ref: 52219 
£200
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Erasmus: Lingua, Sive, De Linguae Usu Atque Abusu Liber Utilissimus; (with) Encomium Moriae, Sive, Declamatio In Laudem Stultitiae; Consultatio De Bello Turcis Inferendo. Lugduni Batavorum [Leiden]: Joannis Maire, 1641; 1641; 1643. 3 bound as 1. 12mo., pp. 410, [xxii]; [viii], 229, [v]; 91, [i]. Third volume without its final blank. Printer's device to each title. Densely annotated in several old hands, occasional spots and smudges but genrally good within. Contemporary vellum, blind-tooled borders, titles inked to spine and both boards (a bit faded), edges red. Spine creased, vellum darkened and marked but still an attractive and interesting copy. Ownership inscriptions of : 'M. Marting [illegible]' dated 1659 to ffep; Charles Best Robinson dated 1852, and Thos. Hodgkin to ffep verso; illegible inscription to top of title-page. The banker and historian Thomas Hodgkin (1831-1913) was author of "Italy and Her Invaders", issued in four volumes in 1870. For the second edition he expanded the work to eight volumes, which were published between 1892 and 1899. STCN 840199635; 840199740; 840231431   Ref: 51266 
£400
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Euripides: (Valckenaer, Lodewijk Caspar, ed.:) Tragoedia Phoenissae. Interpretationem addidit H. Grotii; Graeca castigavit e MStis [...] Lugduni Batavorum [Leiden]: apud Samuelem et Joannem Luchtmans, 1802. 4to., pp. [iv], xxiii, [i], 452, 196. Stub from excised presentation certificate. Lightly toned towards top edge, foxing from p.125 of the second register onwards corresponding to a slightly lower quality paper stock for the final gatherings. Vellum prize binding, raised bands, gilt spine, borders, frame and central coat-of-arms of Amsterdam, edges sprinkled red and blue. Darkened, a bit grubby, ties lost, endpapers lifting but revealing interesting binding structure beneath. A very good copy overall. Reprinted from Valckenaer's "masterly work on Euripides" (Sandys), first printed by Brouwer at Franeker in 1755. Containing the version of Grotius and including the first printing of parts of the Scholia, "enriched by every thing which can render it most acceptable to a critical student", this reprint has been "improved and enlarged" to be "deserving of strong recommendation" (Dibdin). Dibdin (4th edn.) I 545. Schweiger I 119. Graesse II 523. Brunet II 1106.   Ref: 50323 
£275
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E[arbery], M[atthias]: Elements of Policy Civil and Ecclesiastical, in a Mathematical Method. London: printed for John Morphew, 1716. 8vo., pp.[iv], 88. Woodcut initials and decorations in the text. Author's name added in both pen and pencil to slightly dusty title-page,internally very good. Disbound, 20th-century (1950's?) paper wrapper glued at spine, handwritten paper label to front cover, edges lightly sprinkled red. One of numerous works by Matthias Earbery the Younger (1690–1740).'Earbery's views on the rights of hereditary monarchy and episcopacy were those of Charles Leslie, whom he admired, but Earbery had none of Leslie's wit or power of reasoning: his numerous works are largely made up of quantities of historical narrative, related with a strong ideological bias, often laced with personal abuse [...] He was arrested in London in 1723 for seditious libel, and again in 1732 for attacks on Sir Robert Walpole (later first earl of Orford) and King George II in the Royal Oak Journal. His targets ranged from the 'filth of Bangorianism' to John Wyclif, Gilbert Burnet, and Sir John Oldcastle.' (ODNB) ESTC T32602   Ref: 51460 
£95
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