Antiquarian Booksellers Association
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International League of Antiquarian Booksellers

Haskins, Charles: (Wordsworth, C., trans.:) The Charter of Henry III (1227), with a translation [...] New Sarum in the Middle Ages and the History of St Edmund's College, Salisbury [...] Salisbury: The Salisbury Times, issued under the auspices of the Mayor and Corporation of Salisbury, 1927. Unbound (folded into quires but not sewn). 8vo., pp.[xvi], 62, [iv] + 12 plates. Additional title-page to front, 'In Commemoration of the Seventh Centenary of the Granting of King Henry III's Charter [...]'. Occasional small annotations in pen and pencil. A little toned towards front and rear, mark left by a clip to outermost pages, edges uncut. Still good.   Ref: 51854 
£20
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Hearne, Thomas: (Bliss, Philip, ed.:) Reliquiae Hearnianae: The Remains [...] Being Extracts from his MS. Diaries, Collected with a Few Notes [...] Oxford: printed for the Editor, by James Wright, Printer to the University, 1857. First edition, 2 vols., 8vo., pp. viii, 432; [iv], 433-985, [i] + portrait frontispiece to first volume. A little dampstaining at gutter to first few leaves of vol.I, otherwise internally bright. Contemporary tan half calf, red gilt morocco labels to spines, raised bands, marbled paper boards. Spines rubbed with a little loss to vol.I head-cap, joints and edges worn, corners worn with some just beginning to fray, still a good copy. A limited edition of 150 small and 50 large paper copies was produced, of which this is the smaller version.   Ref: 51401 
£150
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Hey, David: Yorkshire from AD 1000. London: Longman, 1986. Paperback. Minor shelf wear, very good. In the series, 'A Regional History of England'.   Ref: 51395 
£7
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Home, Gordon: Yorkshire, Painted and Described [...] London: Adam & Charles Black, 1908. First edition. 8vo., pp. xi, [i], 464, 8 + colour plates, and folding map at rear. Each plate preceeded by a printed tissue. 8-page publisher's catalogue to rear. Heavily decorated beige cloth, white and green rose and leaf motifs and gilt titles to spine and upper board, top edge gilt. Endcaps a bit creased, endpapers toned, very good. Gordon Cochrane Home (1878-1969) was an art editor at 'The Tatler', 'The King' and later at the publishers A & C Black. He worked largely in watercolours, many examples of which can be seen here, and was a frequent exhibitor at the Royal Academy.   Ref: 51687 
£40
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Horsley, John: Britannia Romana or the Roman Antiquities of Britain. Newcastle upon Tyne: Frank Graham, 1974. Second edition. Large folio (361 x 260mm), vi, [vi], xxxii, [iv], 520, [xxxx] +numerous b/w plates. A few first pages of the text, endpapers and edges foxed a little, otherwise internally clean. Blue cloth, black label to spine, gilt. Spine a little faded, edges spotted. A little used, still very good. Ex Libris 'Paul Ashbee' to front paste down. Copy no. 147 label to f.f.e.p. First published 1733. This edition, a facsimile reprint of the first edition with new introduction by Eric Birley, was is limited to 700 copies of which this is no. 147.   Ref: 48441 
£75
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Horsley, John: Britannia Romana: or the Roman Antiquities of Britain: In Three Books. The I. Contains... Roman Transactions... II.... the Roman Inscriptions and Sculptures... III. Contains the Roman Geography of Britain. London: Printed for John Osborn and Thomas Longman. 1732. Folio, pp. [viii], xxxii, 520, [xl] + 5 folded engraved maps and 100 other engraved plates. Includes half-title. Occasional light offsetting and a bit of marginal foxing but generally bright within. Occasional small, unobtrusive paper repairs, 9cm vertical closed tear to leaf 3G2 just touching a few letters near fore-edge. Early 19th-century tan diced Russia, five flat raised bands to heavily gilt spine, ornate gilt border within which a blind-tooled frame, blue marbled edges and endpapers, dark blue silk page marker bound in. Rebacked in calf with original, much darkened spine laid on. Edges worn, corners fraying, endpapers split at hinges but reback holding firm. A very good, sound copy. Two 19th-century armorial bookplates: to the front paste-down, Jeffrey Ekins (bap.1803); to the ffep, Sir Lambton Loraine (1838-1917). MS inscription of William Edward White dated 1953 to ffep recto. Ekins was the brother of Loraine's mother, Caroline Isabella (1804-1847). Sir Lambton Loraine was 11th Baron Loraine of Kirke Harle, Northumberland. His long career in the Royal Navy brought him some fame in 1873 during what became known as the 'Virginius Affair'. The American ship Virginius sailed from Jamaica in October of 1873 carrying weapons and ammunition along with 102 Cuban insurgent passengers, all destined to help fight the Spanish in Cuba. Before it could reach shore the Virginius was captured by the Spanish warship Tornado; a council of war was held by Spanish officials and who decided to begin executing the men on board, including the ship's Captain. On arriving at Santiago de Cuba harbour as Commander of the British warship HMS Niobe, Sir Lambton Loraine intervened by personally visiting the Spanish Military Commander of Santiago and refusing to leave his office until he ordered an end to the executions. His intervention saved the lives of the remaining insurgents and crew. His departure from New York the following year was recorded by the New York Times: 'The vessel moved out of her dock a few minutes after 1 o'clock, Sir Lambton standing by the gangway with his umbrella raised, puffing quietly on his cigar and waving adieus with his hat to the little groups of friends on the pier, who sent him off with a hearty cheer.' 'Horsley had been collecting material on the history of Roman Britain when, about 1727, he began working on them with a view to publication. He was assisted in various aspects of his antiquarian research by his friend and correspondent Robert Cay, and by George Mark, who was probably Horsley's assistant at his school in Morpeth. Mark helped to prepare the plans and drawings for Horsley's history, undertook archaeological tours and explorations, and made surveys, including one of Watling Street. He was also assisted by John Ward, professor of rhetoric at Gresham College, who helped revise the manuscript 'and communicated to him many important remarks for its improvement' (Nichols, Lit. anecdotes, 5.521). Horsley's work on Hadrian's Wall utilized material from Alexander Gordon's Itinerarium septentrionale (1726), though his reliance on this book largely went unacknowledged. The Britannia Romana, or, The Roman Antiquities of Britain was divided into three 'books'. The first contained the history of the Romans in Britain, with accounts of the legions stationed there, the Roman stations, and a substantial description of the Roman walls; the second 'book' contained a complete collection of the Roman inscriptions and sculptures found in Britain, together with historical and critical notes; the third 'book' contained a 'Roman geography of Britain', including all the extant ancient Roman accounts of Britain. Horsley wrote that the first 'book' had cost him: 'much labour and time in my study, to draw out an history of transactions, through so many ages, and at such a distance from our own times But I need not inform the world, that the second book was the most expensive and tedious. Several thousand miles were travelled on this account, to visit antient monuments I omitted no care nor pains, that was necessary to copy these with the greatest exactness, which was the principal design of the work.' (Horsley, Britannia Romana, 1732, i). The book's prefatory dedication to Sir Richard Ellys was written on 2 January 1732, but Horsley did not live to see the publication in early April of this, his greatest achievement. On 12 January he was, according to his friend Ward, 'suddenly and unexpectedly taken off by an apoplexy' (Hinde, 178). His exertions on his Roman history were thought to have contributed to his early death at the age of only forty-six [...] Despite occasional inevitable errors and inaccuracies, Horsley's Britannia Romana was one of the major antiquarian achievements of his day. F. Haverfield in The Roman Occupation of Britain (1924) described it as 'till quite lately the best and most scholarly account of any Roman province that had been written anywhere in Europe' (Haverfield, 75).' (ODNB) ESTC T115200.   Ref: 51872 
£850
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Howell, James: Epistolae Ho-Elianae. Familiar Letters Domestic and Forren [...]; A New Volume of Familiar Letters [...]; A Third Volume of Familiar Letters of a Fresher Date [...]; A Fourth Volume of Familiar Letters, upon Various Emergent Occasions [...] London: Humphrey Moseley, 1655. 4 works as 1. 8vo., pp. [xxiv], 309, [v], 115, [xxiii], 38, [xiv], 126, [x] + folding engraved title plate to the first work. First title-page in red and black, woodcut initials and headpieces, with final advertisement leaf. Trimmed a little close but never affecting print. First title-page a little grubby, a few spots, smudges and light dampstains, some tiny but slightly clumsy repairs to edges. Contemporary polished sheep boards with blind corner tooling, rebacked in sheep with red morocco gilt spine label, edges coloured red. Spine rubbed, joints worn but holding firm, corners a little rubbed, endpapers replaced. A very good copy with an unsubtle but sturdy repair. Bookseller's catalogue description of an 1890 edition of the same work tipped onto ffep. To front paste-down, armorial bookplate of R.E.W. Maddison, 'Philosophiae Doctor'. Maddison (1902-1993) obtained his PhD from King's College London in 1924 after his researches into photochemistry and electrochemistry. He had a particular interest in the history of science and became Librarian of the Royal Astronomical Society in 1965. Third edition copies of the first two works; first editions of the second two works. With an added engraved title page (plate) 'Epistolæ Ho Elianæ Familiar letters domestic & forren partly historical political phylosophical'; signed at foot 'Will: Marshall sculp: 1650'. The second and third works each have a separate dated title-page and pagination; register is continuous. A Fourth Volume of Familiar Letters has a separate dated title-page, pagination and register. Each volume with an index. 'After taking his BA in 1613 Howell initially found employment through Sir Robert Mansell, uncle of his former tutor and steward of a glass factory in Broad Street, London. In 1616 the owners of the factory sent Howell abroad in search of materials and of workmen under a warrant for three years' travel issued by the privy council. The first part of his widely read Epistolae Ho-elianae: Familiar Letters (a series of epistolary volumes assembled and mainly written while Howell was imprisoned in the Fleet during the 1640s) offers a retrospective account of his travels together with his opinions on the peoples and places he encountered along the way.' (ODNB) ESTC R23382   Ref: 52184 
£500
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(Howell, James:) Epistolae Ho-Elianae. Familiar Letters Domestic and Forren; Divided into Six Sections, Partly: Historicall, Politicall, Philosophicall, Upon Emergent Occasions. London: printed for Humphrey Moseley, 1645. First edition. Small 4to. (195 x 150mm), pp. [xx], 88, 120, 40, 48, 92, (ii). Lacks additional engraved title-page. Woodcut initials and head- and tail-pieces, a few pencil marks and underlinings, some ms notes in an old hand including dates and sometimes locations appended to the foot of each letter (according to a note in the same hand, added from the 1737 edition). Occasional wax marks not affecting text. 19th-century plum-coloured faux morocco, gilt label to spine, blind-stamped spine and boards, edges sprinkled red, marbled endpapers. Rubbed, edges a bit worn with some fraying to corners, spine label lifting. Armorial bookplate of Frederick William Cosens to front paste-down, to which is added a ms gift inscription to Allan H. Bright dated 30th May 1891, from H.Y.S.. Armorial bookplate of (Douglas Kinnaird) to title page verso. Tipped to the f.f.e.p., a page of handwritten notes on the content of the book with a brief chronology of Howell's life in pencil beneath. Also added in pencil at the top of the page, a note that the book was purchased from the Cosens sale through Quaritch for £1.4.6 on 20th November 1890. Relatedly, to the f.f.e.p. verso is a note from the disgruntled collector describing both this purchase of the book and his subsequent discovery of the absence of the engraved title-page. Frederick William Cosens (1819-1889) was a wine merchant, writer and collector of books and art. His library was so extensive that when it was sold by Sotheby, Wilkinson and Hodge in the winter of 1890 the sale ran over 14 days and comprised 4995 lots. We believe the second bookplate to be that of Douglas Kinnaird (1788-1830) son of George, 7th Lord Kinnaird and a great friend of Byron. He handled Byron's literary and financial affairs in England after he left in 1816.   Ref: 49912 
£300
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Hoyle, R.W. (ed.): Early Tudor Craven: Subsidies and Assessments, 1510-1547. Leeds: The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1987. First edition. 8vo., pp. xxxiii, 148. Cloth, gilt-lettered and decorated, edges lightly dusted. The Yorkshire Archaeological Society Record Series Volume CXLV for the Year 1985.   Ref: 40837 
£10
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Hunter, Joseph: Hallamshire. The History and Topography of the Parish of Sheffield in the County of York: with Historical and Descriptive Notices of the Parishes of Ecclesfield, Hansworth, Treeton, and Whiston, and of the Chapelry of Bradfield. London: Printed for the Author, by Richard and Arthur Taylor: Published by Lackington, Hughes, Hardi 1819. Large paper copy, folio, pp.x, [ii], 299, [i] + engraved portrait frontispiece and 8 further plates, further engravings in the text. List of subscribers. Occasional marginalia, plates slightly foxed, small tears to frontis., title and leaf 2Q, all repaired. Recent half brown calf with marbled paper boards, gilt and blind tooling to spine, t.e.g., other edges uncut. Some light scuffs to spine, edges dusty, very good. Embossed stamp 'Ex Libris LMP MCMLXII' to f.f.e.p.. Letter dated 1925 to Mrs Dearden of Attercliffe Common, Sheffield loosely inserted. Joseph Hunter (1783-1861) established his reputation as an antiquary relatively late in life with this study of the Sheffield area, and a follow-up on Doncaster a decade later. He performed his research in London and Oxford on holidays from his home in Somerset, finding time to also visit his home city of Sheffield when he could, and borrowing manuscripts when he couldn't.   Ref: 49000 
£300
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