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[Horace] Horatius Flaccus, Quintus: (Bentley, Richard, ed.:) [Opera] ex recensione & cum notis atque emendationibus Richardi Bentleii. Amstelaedami [Amsterdam]: apud Rod. & Gerh. Wetstenios hff, 1713. 4to., pp. [xxiv], 442, [ii], 443-717, [i], [iv], 5-239, [i], including engraved additional title-page and divisional title for 'Pars altera' after p.442. Emendata after p.717 (i.e. 4Y1 verso). Title-page in red and black with engraved vignette, woodcut initials. Lightly foxed throughout occasionally becoming heavier (e.g. gathering 3M), additional engraved title toned with some transfer to title opposite, small stain to lower gutter affecting title and 2 leaves following, a few faint ink smudges, very occasional paper flaws to tail margins but never affecting text. 20th-century half burgundy morocco, raised bands and gilt title to spine, red cloth boards, all edges coloured red, endpapers renewed. Spine a little sunned with some light wear to tail and corners, slight shelf wear but still a very good copy overall. Second and best edition of Bentley's controversial Horace, "rash and tasteless in many of its conjectures, marvellously acute in some others [...] a signal proof of [Bentley's] learning, his ingenuity and his argumentative power" (R.C. Jebb in OED). Unlike the first edition of 1711 it has Bentley's notes on the same page as the text and has an improved index. Bentley was thought for a long time the first classical editor of the modern age and was celebrated and reviled by his contemporaries. The scholar Alexander Cunningham produced a whole edition of Horace specifically against Bentley's in 1721. Dibdin II (4th ed.) 103-5; Bijker 140; Schweiger II 406   Ref: 52198 
£250
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[Horace] Horatius Flaccus, Quintus: (Bentley, Richard, ed.:) [Opera] ex recensione & cum notis atque emendationibus Richardi Bentleii. Editio altera. Amstelaedami [Amsterdam]: Apud Rod. & Gerh. Wetstenios Hff. 1713. 4to., pp. [xxiv] 717, [i], 239, [i], including engraved frontispiece. Without half-title preceeding Book II at p.442 found in some copies. Title page in red and black with engraved device. Some toning (some gatherings more affected), occasional wax specks and light ink smudges, a few faint tidemarks to pp.661-4 and rear pages, marginal repair to index p.123. Contemporary vellum, raised bands, gilt spine, borders and centrepiece of The Hague to both boards, edges red. Soiled, some smudges, gilt fading, edges dusty. The second edition of Bentley's (in)famous edition of Horace, first printed at Cambridge in 1711, notable for his rash but inspired conjectures and emendations. "The Amsterdam editions of 1713 and 1728 are preferable to the Cambridge one of 1711. The notes and text are in the same page, and they are accompanied by the index of Treter, corrected by Verburgius" (Dibdin 104). Dibdin (4th edn.) II 101; Schweiger II 406; Bijker Riedel A140; Lowndes 1113: "The best edition."; Graesse III 354 (note); Brunet III 319 (note).   Ref: 48039 
£300
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[Horace] Horatius Flaccus, Quintus: (Lambinus, Dionysus, ed.:) In Q. Horatium Flaccum ex fide atque auctoritate complurium librorum manuscriptorum a se emendatum, & cum diversis exemplaribus antiquis comparatum [&c.] Francofurti [Frankfurt]: Apud Andreae Wecheli heredes, 1596. 4to., pp. [xvi] 464, 550 [ii]. Outer margin of title restored. Light browning and spotting. Contemporary vellum boards, long sides overlapping, spine lettered in ink (just 'Dionysus Lambinus'), slightly ruckled and soiled, front hinge cracking, f.f.e.p. removed. Denis Lambin's first edition of Horace appeared in 1561, and 'marked a new aera in Horatian criticism', meeting 'with universal applause'. It was reprinted four times in Paris, once in Venice, and twice in Frankfurt (by Wechel, one folio, one quarto), with this being the second, quarto, Frankfurt edition. Adams H945. VD16 H 4878. Dibdin (4th edn.) II 95 (note).   Ref: 32934  show full image..
£750
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[Horace] Horatius Flaccus, Quintus: (Wakefield, Gilbert, ed.:) Quae Supersunt, Recensuit et Notulis Instruxit Gilbertus Wakefield [...] London: Kearsley, 1794. 2 volumes bound as one. 8vo., pp. viii, 186, [viii]; [ii], 168, [x] + 4 plates, including engraved frontispiece to each volume. Errata slip bound in at rear. Plates a little toned with some slight transfer to adjacent pages but generally bright and clean. Contemporary vellum, gilt spine with gilt title label, delicate gilt border to each board, a.e.g., marbled endpapers. A little grubby but still a handsome copy. Bookplate of John Sparrow (1905-1992) to front paste-down. Sparrow was a barrister, essayist, bibliophile and for 25 years Warden of All Souls College, Oxford. 'A very elegant and correct edition, ornamented with plates; the type is clear and beautiful.' Dibdin ESTC T46154; Dibdin (4th edn.) II 116   Ref: 51369 
£225
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Horsley, John: Britannia Romana: or the Roman Antiquities of Britain: In Three Books. The I. Contains... Roman Transactions... II.... the Roman Inscriptions and Sculptures... III. Contains the Roman Geography of Britain. London: Printed for John Osborn and Thomas Longman. 1732. Folio, pp. [viii], xxxii, 520, [xl] + 5 folded engraved maps and 100 other engraved plates. Includes half-title. Occasional light offsetting and a bit of marginal foxing but generally bright within. Occasional small, unobtrusive paper repairs, 9cm vertical closed tear to leaf 3G2 just touching a few letters near fore-edge. Early 19th-century tan diced Russia, five flat raised bands to heavily gilt spine, ornate gilt border within which a blind-tooled frame, blue marbled edges and endpapers, dark blue silk page marker bound in. Rebacked in calf with original, much darkened spine laid on. Edges worn, corners fraying, endpapers split at hinges but reback holding firm. A very good, sound copy. Two 19th-century armorial bookplates: to the front paste-down, Jeffrey Ekins (bap.1803); to the ffep, Sir Lambton Loraine (1838-1917). MS inscription of William Edward White dated 1953 to ffep recto. Ekins was the brother of Loraine's mother, Caroline Isabella (1804-1847). Sir Lambton Loraine was 11th Baron Loraine of Kirke Harle, Northumberland. His long career in the Royal Navy brought him some fame in 1873 during what became known as the 'Virginius Affair'. The American ship Virginius sailed from Jamaica in October of 1873 carrying weapons and ammunition along with 102 Cuban insurgent passengers, all destined to help fight the Spanish in Cuba. Before it could reach shore the Virginius was captured by the Spanish warship Tornado; a council of war was held by Spanish officials and who decided to begin executing the men on board, including the ship's Captain. On arriving at Santiago de Cuba harbour as Commander of the British warship HMS Niobe, Sir Lambton Loraine intervened by personally visiting the Spanish Military Commander of Santiago and refusing to leave his office until he ordered an end to the executions. His intervention saved the lives of the remaining insurgents and crew. His departure from New York the following year was recorded by the New York Times: 'The vessel moved out of her dock a few minutes after 1 o'clock, Sir Lambton standing by the gangway with his umbrella raised, puffing quietly on his cigar and waving adieus with his hat to the little groups of friends on the pier, who sent him off with a hearty cheer.' 'Horsley had been collecting material on the history of Roman Britain when, about 1727, he began working on them with a view to publication. He was assisted in various aspects of his antiquarian research by his friend and correspondent Robert Cay, and by George Mark, who was probably Horsley's assistant at his school in Morpeth. Mark helped to prepare the plans and drawings for Horsley's history, undertook archaeological tours and explorations, and made surveys, including one of Watling Street. He was also assisted by John Ward, professor of rhetoric at Gresham College, who helped revise the manuscript 'and communicated to him many important remarks for its improvement' (Nichols, Lit. anecdotes, 5.521). Horsley's work on Hadrian's Wall utilized material from Alexander Gordon's Itinerarium septentrionale (1726), though his reliance on this book largely went unacknowledged. The Britannia Romana, or, The Roman Antiquities of Britain was divided into three 'books'. The first contained the history of the Romans in Britain, with accounts of the legions stationed there, the Roman stations, and a substantial description of the Roman walls; the second 'book' contained a complete collection of the Roman inscriptions and sculptures found in Britain, together with historical and critical notes; the third 'book' contained a 'Roman geography of Britain', including all the extant ancient Roman accounts of Britain. Horsley wrote that the first 'book' had cost him: 'much labour and time in my study, to draw out an history of transactions, through so many ages, and at such a distance from our own times But I need not inform the world, that the second book was the most expensive and tedious. Several thousand miles were travelled on this account, to visit antient monuments I omitted no care nor pains, that was necessary to copy these with the greatest exactness, which was the principal design of the work.' (Horsley, Britannia Romana, 1732, i). The book's prefatory dedication to Sir Richard Ellys was written on 2 January 1732, but Horsley did not live to see the publication in early April of this, his greatest achievement. On 12 January he was, according to his friend Ward, 'suddenly and unexpectedly taken off by an apoplexy' (Hinde, 178). His exertions on his Roman history were thought to have contributed to his early death at the age of only forty-six [...] Despite occasional inevitable errors and inaccuracies, Horsley's Britannia Romana was one of the major antiquarian achievements of his day. F. Haverfield in The Roman Occupation of Britain (1924) described it as 'till quite lately the best and most scholarly account of any Roman province that had been written anywhere in Europe' (Haverfield, 75).' (ODNB) ESTC T115200.   Ref: 51872 
£850
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Howard, John: Aikin, John (ed.): An Account of the Principal Lazarettos in Europe; with Various Papers Relative to the Plague: Together with Further Observations on Some Foreign Prisons and Hospitals; and Additional Remarks on the Present State of Those in Great Britain and Ireland; [bound with] Appendix, Containing Observations Co Warrington: printed by William Eyres; and sold by T. Cadell, J. Johnson, C. Dilly, and J.Taylor, in 1789; 1791. First edition. 4to., pp. viii, 259, [xv]; [ii], 32 + 23 engraved plates (many of which folding), including a very large table. With half-title and leaf of instructions to binder bound in. Odd spots of foxing and the occasional light ink smudge, sporadic light toning; several plates with closed tears near attachments, 3 of which significant, plate edges often lightly crumpled, occasional foxing, faint dampstain to fore-edge margin of final 2 plates. Contemporary marbled calf recently rebacked plainly but competently, green morocco gilt spine label, edges coloured yellow, marbled endpapers, cloth-reinforced hinges. Joints a little creased, edges rubbed and corners wearing but a sound, handsome copy. Armorial bookplate of The Right Hon. Earl of Suffolk and Berkshire to front paste-down. Oddly, this book was written by one John Howard and owned by another, completely unrelated, one: General John Howard, 15th Earl of Suffolk & 8th Earl of Berkshire (1739-1820) was a British soldier and nobleman. The price of 'Twelve Shillings unbound' is printed below the imprint (omitted in some copies). Howard (1726?1790) spent 15 months from 1785, travelling throughout western and southern Europe inspecting lazarettos (quarantine stations) for the treatment of plague victims. Here we find the result of his work, An Account of the Principal Lazarettos in Europe, published at Warrington in 1789. In it he surveys conditions in lazarettos, prisons and hospitals, going into great detail and making observations and suggestions for their improvement. He organises his findings by first by country, and then by county when he gets to Ireland, Scotland and England. Writing near the end of his life, he also reflects on his own efforts at reform. Of the Gaol at Southwark he writes that prisoners awaiting transportation to Australia 'lay almost perishing in the gaol': 'I am persuaded this would have been in great measure prevented, if penitentiary houses had been built on the salutory spot at Islington fixed on by Dr. Fothergill and myself: the gentlemen whose continual opposition defeated the design, and adopted the expensive, dangerous and destructive scheme of transportation to Botany Bay, I leave to their own reflections upon their conduct.' (p.147). Howard set off again on his travels a few years later but died of fever at Kherson in southern Russia on 20th January 1790. The results of his final travels are found in the added Appendix here. 'His death was announced in the London Gazette (1790, 174), a unique honour for a civilian, and his statue, the first to be admitted to the cathedral, was erected by public subscription in St Paul's.' (ODNB) ESTC T115289   Ref: 51654  show full image..
£650
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Howell, James: Epistolae Ho-Elianae. Familiar Letters Domestic and Forren [...]; A New Volume of Familiar Letters [...]; A Third Volume of Familiar Letters of a Fresher Date [...]; A Fourth Volume of Familiar Letters, upon Various Emergent Occasions [...] London: Humphrey Moseley, 1655. 4 works as 1. 8vo., pp. [xxiv], 309, [v], 115, [xxiii], 38, [xiv], 126, [x] + folding engraved title plate to the first work. First title-page in red and black, woodcut initials and headpieces, with final advertisement leaf. Trimmed a little close but never affecting print. First title-page a little grubby, a few spots, smudges and light dampstains, some tiny but slightly clumsy repairs to edges. Contemporary polished sheep boards with blind corner tooling, rebacked in sheep with red morocco gilt spine label, edges coloured red. Spine rubbed, joints worn but holding firm, corners a little rubbed, endpapers replaced. A very good copy with an unsubtle but sturdy repair. Bookseller's catalogue description of an 1890 edition of the same work tipped onto ffep. To front paste-down, armorial bookplate of R.E.W. Maddison, 'Philosophiae Doctor'. Maddison (1902-1993) obtained his PhD from King's College London in 1924 after his researches into photochemistry and electrochemistry. He had a particular interest in the history of science and became Librarian of the Royal Astronomical Society in 1965. Third edition copies of the first two works; first editions of the second two works. With an added engraved title page (plate) 'Epistolæ Ho Elianæ Familiar letters domestic & forren partly historical political phylosophical'; signed at foot 'Will: Marshall sculp: 1650'. The second and third works each have a separate dated title-page and pagination; register is continuous. A Fourth Volume of Familiar Letters has a separate dated title-page, pagination and register. Each volume with an index. 'After taking his BA in 1613 Howell initially found employment through Sir Robert Mansell, uncle of his former tutor and steward of a glass factory in Broad Street, London. In 1616 the owners of the factory sent Howell abroad in search of materials and of workmen under a warrant for three years' travel issued by the privy council. The first part of his widely read Epistolae Ho-elianae: Familiar Letters (a series of epistolary volumes assembled and mainly written while Howell was imprisoned in the Fleet during the 1640s) offers a retrospective account of his travels together with his opinions on the peoples and places he encountered along the way.' (ODNB) ESTC R23382   Ref: 52184 
£500
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Howell, James: Lustra Ludovici, or the Life of the late Victorious King of France, Lewis the XIII. (And of his Cardinall de Richelieu). Divided into Seven Lustres. London: printed for Humphrey Moseley, 1646. First edition. Small folio (278 x 182mm), pp. [xii], 188, [viii] (with usual mispaginations), including to leaf *2 recto an engraved portrait of Charles II as a boy, signed G.G.. Some woodcut initials and decorations. Short annotations in an old hand to p.131 and p.144, plus a few underlinings in the same ink. Title-page a little dusty, occasional light ink smudges, short closed tear to bottom margin leaf V3. Contemporary deep red morocco, spine heavily gilt with raised bands, gilt borders and frames with corner tools to each board, a.e.g., marbled endpapers. A few small marks and scuffs, small repaired scrape to upper board, bottom fore-edge corner of upper board bumped. A very handsome copy. To the third compartment of the spine, a complex monogram surmounted by a baron's coronet. To the front paste-down, an armorial bookplate of the North Library of the Earl of Macclesfield, dated 1860. To the ffep verso a short note in an old hand: 'Sept. 5. 1720. Collat. & perfect (?) J. Wright.' 'Anne' has been added to the title-page, again in an old hand, but the surname has been erased leaving a small hole. A small blind-embossed Macclesfield coat of arms has been added to the title-page and subsequent four pages, plus a few other leaves elsewhere. Howell was imprisoned in the Fleet in 1643 and remained there for the next eight years. This incarceration 'forced Howell into an intense period of writing, for both financial and political reasons [...] Almost immediately after his imprisonment Howell was forced into a defence of parliamentary privilege in order to deflect William Prynne's charge that he was 'no friend to Parliaments, but a malignant'. Prynne based his objections on a few mildly anti-parliamentary remarks Howell had made in Dodona's Grove in 1640. In 1644 Howell issued from the Fleet a series of tracts intended to present a carefully worded, moderate position and at the same time to urge a general return to reason.' (ODNB) ESTC R4873; Wing H3092   Ref: 51871 
£800
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(Howell, James:) Epistolae Ho-Elianae. Familiar Letters Domestic and Forren; Divided into Six Sections, Partly: Historicall, Politicall, Philosophicall, Upon Emergent Occasions. London: printed for Humphrey Moseley, 1645. First edition. Small 4to. (195 x 150mm), pp. [xx], 88, 120, 40, 48, 92, (ii). Lacks additional engraved title-page. Woodcut initials and head- and tail-pieces, a few pencil marks and underlinings, some ms notes in an old hand including dates and sometimes locations appended to the foot of each letter (according to a note in the same hand, added from the 1737 edition). Occasional wax marks not affecting text. 19th-century plum-coloured faux morocco, gilt label to spine, blind-stamped spine and boards, edges sprinkled red, marbled endpapers. Rubbed, edges a bit worn with some fraying to corners, spine label lifting. Armorial bookplate of Frederick William Cosens to front paste-down, to which is added a ms gift inscription to Allan H. Bright dated 30th May 1891, from H.Y.S.. Armorial bookplate of (Douglas Kinnaird) to title page verso. Tipped to the f.f.e.p., a page of handwritten notes on the content of the book with a brief chronology of Howell's life in pencil beneath. Also added in pencil at the top of the page, a note that the book was purchased from the Cosens sale through Quaritch for £1.4.6 on 20th November 1890. Relatedly, to the f.f.e.p. verso is a note from the disgruntled collector describing both this purchase of the book and his subsequent discovery of the absence of the engraved title-page. Frederick William Cosens (1819-1889) was a wine merchant, writer and collector of books and art. His library was so extensive that when it was sold by Sotheby, Wilkinson and Hodge in the winter of 1890 the sale ran over 14 days and comprised 4995 lots. We believe the second bookplate to be that of Douglas Kinnaird (1788-1830) son of George, 7th Lord Kinnaird and a great friend of Byron. He handled Byron's literary and financial affairs in England after he left in 1816.   Ref: 49912 
£300
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Ignatius of Antioch, Saint: (Smith, Thomas, & John Pearson, eds.:) Epistolae genuinae, juxta exemplum Mediceum denuo recensitae [...] accedunt acta genuina martyrii S. Ignatii, epistola S. Polycarpi ad Philippenses, et Smyrnensis ecclesiae epistola de S. Polycarpi martyrio; cum veteribus latinis versionibus, & annotationibus Thomae Smithi. Oxonii [Oxford] e Theatro Sheldoniano 1709. First edition thus. 4to., pp. [xiv] 117 [iii]. Text in double column, Greek and Latin. Horizontal tear in one leaf partly through one line of text (no loss), some light spotting. Contemporary calf, panelled in blind, plainly rebacked and corners repaired, old leather rather scratched, red morocco label, old endpapers preserved. Small old ownership inscription of John Maddocks(?) to title-page, one leaf with a long manuscript note in an old hand. The letters of St. Ignatius of Antioch, second bishop after St. Peter of Rome; the edition contains notes by John Pearson (1613-1686), "probably the ablest scholar and best systematic theologian among Englishmen of the seventeenth century" (CDNB), author also of an important defence of the authenticity of Ignatius's letters (1672). Thomas Smith, editor (1638-1710), sometime fellow of Magdalen College Oxford, was librarian of the Cottonian library. Dibdin calls it "A very excellent edition; with some new and inedited notes of Pearson." Dibdin (4th edn.) I 178.   Ref: 39548  show full image..
£600
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