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[Quintilian] Quintilianus, Marcus Fabius: (Spalding, Georg Ludwig, ed.:) De Institutione Oratoria libri duodecim ad codicum veterum fidem recensuit et annotatione explanavit Georg. Ludovicus Spalding A.M. Gymnasii Berolino-Coloniensis professor [...] Lipsiae [Leipzig]: Sumtibus Siegfried Lebrecht Crusii (Vols. I-IV); Sumptibus Frid. Christ. Guil. Vo 1798-1834. 6 vols., 8vo., pp. lxxxvi, 628, [iv]; viii, 652, [ii]; xii, 646, [ii]; xviii, [iv], 718, [ii]; xxviii, 478, [ii]; lxxxiv, 1042, [ii]. Publisher's list to final page verso, vol. I. Vol. VI has additional title-page facing t.p. proper: 'Lexicon Quintilianeum edidit Eduardus Bonnellus Gymnasii Berolinensis professoris'. Occasional spots of foxing but generally bright, small closed tear to vol. IV title-page. Mid 20th-century half light tan calf, red morocco spine labels, red marbled paper boards, edges lightly sprinkled brown, contrasting marbled endpapers. Some patchy colour variation to spines (possibly from injudicious use of leather dressing), a little rubbed but a very good set. To the flyleaf of each volume, 'David M. Gaunt (Re-bound, Jan. 1968)'. This is likely the classicist David Martin Gaunt who served at Bletchley Park during WWII (see the 'Roll of Honour' on the Bletchley website) and published an edition of Quintilian in 1952. An additional crossed-through ownership inscription to vol. I. An edition much praised by Dibdin (writing of the first four volumes): 'It was wish of Ernesti that some ingenious and erudite scholar, "florens adhuc aetate," would favour the classical world with a complete edition of Quintilian [...]. The above excellent production of Spalding seems to have realised this wish.' Dibdin II 4th edn. 371   Ref: 50392 
£390
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Rapin, Rene: Les Artifices des Heretiques Paris: Chez Sebastien Mabre-Cramoisy. 1681. 12mo. pp. [xii], 444. Woodcut vignette to title. Small clean tear from outer edge of p.271, few leaves a trifle browned or dampstained. Contemporary sprinkled calf, raised bands, spine triple gilt ruled, gilt fleurons and tendrils, all edges sprinkled red. Boards and outer edges rubbed. A rather vigorous Jesuit diatribe against Jansenism as an heretical imposture, listing the 24 psychological techniques and social behaviours by which Jansenists pass themselves off as 'saintly people'.   Ref: 53164 
£200
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Ross, Alexander: [Davies, John, trans.:] [Greek letters] Pansebeia: or, A View of all Religions in the world: with the several church-governments, from the creation to these times. Also, a discovery of all known heresies in all ages and places: and choice observations & reflections throughout th [with] Apocalypsis: or, the revelation of certain notorious advancers of heresie [...] London: printed by Sarah Griffin for J.S [...], 1664. 2 parts in 1. 8vo., pp. [xxxii], 544, [xxxii], 78, [ii], including engraved portrait frontispiece by Lombart. MS longitudinal half-title, 'Ross his View of Religions'. Woodcut initials, second part with separate title-page, 3A1 and 3a4 blanks, and several engraved portraits in the text. Dampstain to fore-edge margin of frontis and half-title, diminishing through the first gathering, ink smudge to p.182 obscuring a couple of words, tiny wormhole to final leaf affecting a few letters, gathering 2N (a table) cropped close with slight loss at fore-edge in some places, occasional light spots and smudges. Recent tan morocco, red gilt title label to spine, gilt and carbon-tooled borders with small carbon-tooled centrepiece to each board, edges coloured red, endpapers renewed. Spine slightly creased, very light shelf-wear, a very good copy in a competent modern binding. Fourth edition of Ross' (1591–1654) Pansebia (first published 1652), to which is added the third edition of Apocalypsis (first edition in English, 1655). Apocalypsis was translated by John Davies from the Latin edition, Apocalypsis insignium aliquot hæresiarcharvm (Leiden, 1608), which was taken from the Dutch original, Growelen der vornemsten hooft-ketteren by H. L. van Haestens (Leiden, 1607). ESTC R218401; Wing R1974 & 1945A   Ref: 52188 
£375
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Rymer, Thomas: The Tragedies of the Last Age, Consider'd and Examin'd by the Practice of the Ancients, and by the Common Sense of all Ages in a Letter to Fleetwood Shepheard, Esq. London: Printed and are to be sold by Richard Baldwin [...] 1692. 2nd edition. 8vo., pp. [xvi], 144. Imprimatur leaf opposite title page dated July 17 1677, half-page printer's advertisement to final leaf verso. Fore-edge corner of title-page repaired at head, small rust mark near head of p.1, closed tear to bottom edge pp. 39-40 affecting bottom 4 lines of text but with no loss, a little grubby towards edges, occasional spots of foxing. Recent half tan morocco, raised bands and gilt title to spine, marbled boards, edges coloured red, endpapers renewed. Spine lightly sunned, a little dusty, very good. An MS note on Thomas Rymer to the imprimatur leaf recto; to the verso, inscription of (Charles?) Callan dated 1785, 'Ex. Lib.' with the name then removed, and a small note '2nd part never published'. The title-page identifies this as 'Part I', but in fact the old note is correct that no further parts were published. The first edition appeared in 1678 without 'Part I' on the title page. In this critical essay Thomas Rymer (1642/3–1713) identifies what he believes to be 'the choicest and most applauded English Tragedies of that last age; as Rollo; A King and No King; the Maid's Tragedy, by Beaumont and Fletcher; Othello, Julius Cæsar, by Shakespeare; and Cataline by Worthy Ben', and considers them in the context of classical tragedy. 'Rymer managed to rehearse the plots of the first three plays (Rollo is of uncertain authorship) and to analyse the plays according to his views on how tragedy should be written. He advocated strict compliance with the theory of decorum—characters were stereotyped, with soldiers being courageous; women, modest. Poetical justice demanded that the good be rewarded, the evil punished. Plots should not be improbable; plays should have a moral.' (ODNB) Indeed, Rymer is credited with coining the expression 'poetic justice'. ESTC R7998; Wing R2431   Ref: 52268 
£225
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Sallustius Crispus, Caius: (Rose, William, trans.:) The History of Catiline's Conspiracy, and the Jugurthine War. With a new translation of Cicero's four orations against Catiline. To which is prefixed, the life of Sallust. By William Rose. London: Printed for D. Browne, A. Millar, G. Keith, W. Owen, R. Griffith, P. Davey and B. Law, 1757. 8vo, pp. xvi, 253, [3]. Contemporary sheep, spine divided by raised bands between gilt rules, second compartment lettered in ink. Some foxing. Extremities a little rubbed - particularly spine ends - with short cracks at head and tail of lower joint. Ownership inscriptions of J. Strickland and Robt. Field (a gift from John Walker, 1820) to front flyleaf, a short note to verso (probably by Strickland) and one marginal annotation (ditto) in the text, both correcting the translation. The rare second issue of this translation by William Rose (1719-1786), a Scottish schoolmaster who had moved to west London following his marriage, where he befriended Samuel Johnson as well as translating Sallust. It was originally published in 1751 and this is in fact a reissue with a cancel titlepage. Neither version is at all common: ESTC locates just one copy of this one in the UK (BL), with 7 more outside, and the first issue in two locations in the UK (BL & Oxford) and two outside. ESTC T93461.   Ref: 53241 
£350
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[Sallust] Sallustius Crispus, Gaius: (Boxhorn, M.Z., ed.:) (Opera) [...] Lugduni Batavorum [Leiden]: Ex Officina Elzeviriana. 1634. 12mo (120 x 65mm), pp. [xvi], 310, [xxxiv]. Engraved title, woodcut vignette of Sallust facing p.1, ornament of the head of Medusa on p.216, ornament at end of index. Very minor mainly marginal foxing, the odd spot. Later (c.1800?) straight-grained morocco, double gilt ruled, bordered with roll of palmettes in blind, spine double gilt ruled, gilt fleurons and dentelles, gilt-lettered, inner edges gilt, a.e.g., silk bookmark. Wanting ffep, head and foot of spine and lower edges a trifle rubbed. 18th-century French bibliographic note to fly, illegible near contemporary autograph on [*]8. Second reprint of the first Elzevir edition, also 1634. Willems 412, Dibdin (4th edn) II 384.   Ref: 53180 
£250
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Severus, Sulpicius: Opera Omnia. quae extant. Amstelodami [Amsterdam]: Ex officina Elzeviriana, 1656. 12mo. 332pp., [4]. Engraved title, decorated initials and ornaments. Title and verso of last leaf dusty, one small marginal tear to title. Contemporary (Welsh?) sprinkled calf, blind ruled with arabesque cornerpieces in blind, raised bands. Joints a bit cracked but firm, covers little rubbed. Ex-libris of William Lhwyd to flyleaf. 'Re-imprint line by line of the edition produced by the Elzevirs of Leiden in 1643', 'very nice' (Willems 1207). Willems 1207.   Ref: 53176 
£150
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Silius Italicus: De Secundo Bello Punico. Amsterodami [Amsterdam]: Apud Guiljel. Janssonium, 1620. 16mo. in 8's, pp. 279, [i]. Title-page with engraved historiated border. Occasional light stains and smudges. Later parchment over thin boards, black and gilt label to spine, edges sprinkled red. A bit grubby, tiny nick to parchment at head edge, very good. Armorial bookplate of John Peter Fearon (c.1804-73) to front pastedown. John Peter Fearon was a distinguished parliamentary lawyer and acted for the major railway companies at that time. He also acted for the Meuse and Sambre railway in Belgium. He was also a Solicitor to the Attorney General in Charity Affairs. He was, among many other matters, also responsible for the drafting of new Charters for New College, Oxford and St Cross, Winchester.' (fearonlaw dot com) Pocket-sized copy of Silius Italicus's (c.28 – c.103) only surviving work, the 17-book Punica, an epic poem about the Second Punic War. Schweiger 955   Ref: 51724 
£125
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Smith, Matthew: Memoirs of Secret Service. London: printed for A. Baldwin near the Oxford Arms in Warwick Lane, 1699. 8vo., pp. 160, 24. Short 'Advertisement' cutting pasted to blank leaf opposite title-page, the final 24-page section is titled 'The reasons why I corresponded with Mr. John Hewet'.. Foxed, occasional marginal smudges. Contemporary calf boards, rebacked with raised bands and gilt title to spine, marbled endpapers, joints repaired with cloth. Spine rubbed, upper joint a bit worn, corners worn and fraying, two small patches of surface loss to rear board one of which patched. A well-used copy but still sound and very good overall Typewritten catalogue description for a different edition pasted to first blank leaf. Seemingly contemporary inscription of Robert Welborne to head of title-page. 'Letters published by Smith concerning the conspiracy of Charles Mordaunt, Earl of Monmouth and Peterborough, and complaining of his treatment at the hands of the Duke of Shrewsbury and James Vernon.' (ESTC). The catalogue clipping pasted in at the front states that the work is 'said to have been written by Charles, Earl of Peterborough, with the assistance of Dr Davenant, against the Duke of Shrewsbury. It was ordered by the House of Peers to be burnt by the hangman. (Mackay's Memoirs, p.64)' ESTC R10305; Wing (2nd ed.), S4131   Ref: 52378 
£500
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Solerius Cemeliensis, Anselmus, pseud. [Raynaud, Théophile]; (Frisius, Andreas Wilhelmus, ed.): Bosso, Girolamo: De pileo cæterisque capitis tegminibus tam sacris, quàm profanis. Editio novissima aucta, emendata & figuris æneis exornata; [bound with] De toga romana commentarivs, Accedit ex Philippo Rvbenio iconismus statuae togatae, et praeter indicem geminum, quem adjecimus, De modo gestandi togam ex Ferrario dissertatio. Amstelodami [Amseterdam]: sumptibus Andreæ Frisii, 1671; 1671. 2 works bound as 1, often found together. 12mo., pp. [xii], 379, [xli] + 4 plates, including 3 folding; 84, [xii] + 1 folding plate. De Pileo with engraved title-page and second title-page with vignette (both part of first gathering), many engraved illustrations several of which occupy a full page, with final blank leaf. Very slightly toned but clean, short repaired tear to De Toga Romana's folding plate at gutter. Contemporary vellum, title inked to spine, edges sprinkled red. A few marks and smudges, corners very mildly rubbed, a very good copy indeed. Solerius' De Pileo is a curious work on hats and headgear, pseudonymously published by the French Jesuit theologian Théophile Raynaud (1583-1663). Amongst the numerous illustrations, the engraved title-page is signed by Romeyn de Hooghe; one folded plate is signed by Cornelis Galle. This 'new edition' of 1671 followed its original publication in Leiden in 1655. Here, it is found paired with the second edition of Girolamo Bosso's work on Roman secular and clerical togas, which made its first appearance in Pavia in 1614. Lipperheide 1650; Barbier III 700 & Lipperheide 220; Colas 399   Ref: 52285 
£500
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