Antiquarian Booksellers Association
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Statius, Publius Papinius: (Stephens, Thomas, trans.:) An Essay Upon Statius: or, the Five First Books of Publ. Papinius Statius his Thebais. Done Into English Verse by T.S. With the Poetick History Illustrated. London: printed for Richard Royston, 1648. First edition. 8vo., pp.[xiv], 152 including portrait frontispiece. Bound without preliminary blanks. Woodcut headpieces. Small burn hole to leaf C4 affecting a couple of lettters, a few small spots and smudges. 19th-century tan polished calf, neatly rebacked with original spine retained, two black morocco and gilt labels to spine, edges sprinkled grey, some pencilled bibliographical notes to endpapers, A few scrapes to lower board, corners a little worn, but still very good. Bookplate of Christopher Rowe to front paste-down. From the library of Thomas Park (1758/91834), antiquary and bibliographer, with his signature to the title-page but sadly without the heavy annotation for which he was known. The first translation of Statius into English. Stephens (d.1677), headmaster of the grammar school at Bury St Edmunds, claims in the prefatory material that the translation is purely for use by his students. Indeed, it does serve to as introduction to Statius' poetry during a time 'increasingly hostile to his aesthetics as well as to his politics'. However, this claim is shown to be a little disingenuous, as Stephens' Royalist sympathies are quite apparent in his translation. He 'seems to have seen in Statius' Thebaid a poem for his times that, translated, could provide an oblique commentary on English politics and the crisis of monarchy.' (Brill's Companion to Statius, p.603) This work appears at a fraught point in the career of its publisher Richard Royston, 'staunch supporter of the church and the crown'. Imprisoned in the Fleet from July to October of 1645 for issuing an anti-parliament parody of Robert Ram's Soldier's Catechism, by 1648 he was embroiled in the controversial publication of Eikon Basilike, allegedly written by Charles I during his incarceration. 'Royston's involvement with the publication had begun earlier and by the end of 1648 he contrived to get Eikon into print, using a series of printers, and began distributing it. Although it has been suggested that he was imprisoned for publishing the King's Book, there is no evidence of this. However, in October 1649, nine months after the execution of Charles I, Royston was called before the council of state and was bound in £500 to appear 'when required, and not to print or sell any unlicensed books or pamphlets in the meantime' (CSP dom., 164950, 524).' (ODNB) ESTC R21944; Wing S5335   Ref: 51516  show full image..
£950
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Stukeley, William: An Account of Richard of Cirencester, Monk of Westminster, and of his Works: with his Antient Map of Roman Brittain; and the Itinerary thereof. Read at the Antiquarian Society, March 18, 1756. London: printed by Richard Hett: and sold by Charles Corbet, 1757. First edition. 4to, pp. 94, [ii] + folding map, + blank leaf to front and rear. A few woodcut initials and decorations, facsimile of part of an original MS to final leaf. Blank leaves foxed and a little tattered at edges, first and final few leaves toned at edges (seemingly acid transfer from a previous leather binding); map a little creased at head and tail edges, with 75mm closed tear along one fold and short closed tears at each end of gutter attachment. Recently rebound in dark green library buckram backed with dark green textured sheep, gilt title to spine, new endpapers with cloth-reinforced hinges. A very good copy in an incongruent but very practical binding. Library code in red ink to title-page. To title-page verso, armorial bookplate of 'A. Gifford, D.D. of the Museum'. Baptist minister Andrew Gifford (1700-1784) was assistant librarian at the British Museum from 1757 to 1784. He left many of his books, and other objects, to the Baptist College in Bristol. 'In 1747 Stukeley received a letter from a young Englishman named Charles Bertram, resident in Copenhagen, informing him of his discovery of a medieval copy of a previously unknown Roman map and itinerary of Britain, allegedly made by a fourteenth-century monk of Westminster. Stuart Piggott has described this episode as 'one of the most audacious and successful literary forgeries of the eighteenth century' (Piggott, William Stukeley: an Eighteenth-Century Antiquary, 127). Although Stukeley attempted to purchase the (non-existent) manuscript of De situ Britanniae for the newly opened British Museum, the amicable correspondence between him and Bertram did lead to the publication of Stukeley's An Account of Richard of Cirencester, Monk of Westminster, and of his Works (1757) and Bertram's Britannicarum gentium historiae antiquae scriptores tres (1757, including authentic works by Gildas and Nennius). Bertram's forgery as disseminated in these two books was a great success, and De situ was considered an authentic source for Roman Britain (it was even used in part by Edward Gibbon). The forgery was not fully discredited until 1869.' (ODNB) ESTC T68353   Ref: 51077 
£500
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Tacitus, Publius Cornelius: [...] Opera, Quae Extant. Integris J. Lipsii, Rhenani, Ursini, Mureti, Pichenae, Merceri, Gruteri, Acidalii, Grotii, Freinshemii, & selectis aliorum commentariis illustrata. Joh. Fred. Gronovius recensuit, & suas notas passim adjecit. Accedunt Jacobi Gronovii exc Amstelodami [Amsterdam]: Daniel Elzevir, 1672. 2 vols. 8vo, pp. [xxxii], 1224; [ii], 899, [xi], [ccxxiii]. Additional engraved title-page to first vol., woodcut device to title-page, woodcut head & tail pieces & initials. Occasional light foxing, small loss to fore-edge margin of engraved title-page, vol. II with one front endpaper excised and a marginal scorch-hole to Y7. Late 19th-century red straight-grain morocco, spines and boards blind tooled, gilt titles, a.e.g, green endpapers. Joints, endcaps and corners a bit rubbed, a few faint spots and smudges but very good overall. To front paste-down of each volume a 20th-century bookplate of James Elwin Millard. To front paste-down of vol. I, small bookseller's ticket of Edward Rainford of 12 Red Lion Passage. To preliminary blank, MS extract from Dibdin. Described by Dibdin as more 'beautiful and valuable' than the 1685 Bleau edition, though he observes that the Bipont editors consider that 'its accuracy is not equal to its beauty'. Contains the notes of various commentators including J.F. Gronovius, who unfortunately died before the work was completed. Willems 1479; Dibdin II (4th ed.) 453   Ref: 52212 
£600
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Tacitus, Publius(?) Cornelius: (Opera) Cum optimis exemplaribus collatus, adiecti sunt capitulorum numeri. Amstelodami [Amsterdam]: Typis Danielis Elzevirii, 1665. 24mo, pp. 624, [24]. Late 19th-century sprinkled calf, boards bordered with a triple gilt rule, spine divided by gilt rules, red morocco label, other compartments with either small central flower tool or infilled with a diaper pattern in gilt, marbled endpapers, edges sprinkled blue and red. Cut a little close by the binder with some headlines shaved (particularly in the index). Extremities rubbed, corners a touch worn, a small spot of insect damage to upper joint. The second pocket-format Elzevir edition of Tacitus, a line-for-line reprint of the 1649 first. Willems 1364.   Ref: 53244 
£150
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Tacitus, Publius(?) Cornelius: Opera: ad fidem optimarum editionum expressa. Edinburgi [Edinburgh]: Apud Bell & Bradfute, J. Dickson, et T. Duncan, 1792. 2 vols, 12mo, pp. xii, 384; [ii], 410. Contemporary tree calf, spine divided by double gilt rules, red morocco labels. Some minor spotting, a dampmark to foot of index in vol. 2. Extremities a touch rubbed, slight cracking to ends of joints. Ownership stamp of Robert Montgomery, Convoy, to front pastedowns, with his ownership inscription to title-page of vol. 1. A pleasant and unsophisticated binding, perhaps Irish, on a scarce Edinburgh printing of the works of Tacitus. The early owner Robert Montgomery is from a significant family of Ulster Scots who settled in Convoy, County Donegal. ESTC locates 5 copies of this edition in the UK (Birmingham, BL, NLS, NLW, National Trust), the same again in the USA, and one in Amsterdam. ESTC T96040.   Ref: 53246 
£150
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Tacitus, Publius(?) Cornelius: (Ernesti, J.A., ed.:) Opera iterum recensuit. Notas integras Iusti Lipsii, I.F. Gronovii, Nic. Heinsii et suas addidit Io. Augustus Ernesti. Lipsiae [Leipzig]: Apud Weidmanii Haered. et Reichium, 1772. 2 vols., 8vo, pp. lvi, [vi], 896; 752, [176] + engraved frontispiece in vol. 1. Contemporary speckled calf, smooth spines divided by double gilt rules, black morocco labels, other compartments with central gilt tools (or gilt numbered direct within a circular frame), marbled endpapers. Poorquality paper rather browned and foxed. Leather somewhat rubbed and crackled but since polished. An attractive copy of the second Ernesti edition after the first of 1757, being 'the more copious edition' of the pair; in both 'the preface, notes, and indexes, will be found interesting and useful; many obscure passages are explained' (Dibdin). Dibdin II 455.   Ref: 53245 
£200
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[Terence] Terentius Afer, Publius: Comoediae. Birminghamiae [Birmingham]: Johannis Baskerville, 1772. First Baskerville edition. Large 4to, pp. [ii], 364. Pp.203,299 misnumbered 303, 283 respectively, as usual. Title-page recto and final leaf verso lightly toned, occasional light foxing, a few faint smudgy marks. Late 19th- or perhaps early 20th-century brown polished and sprinkled sheep, gilt spine with raised bands and burgundy morocco title label, plain double-fillet borders, a.e.g, marbled endpapers. Edges and raised bands a bit rubbed, some wear to joints and corners but still a very good, handsome copy. Tiny bookbinder's stamp reading 'Bound by Birdsall. Northampton & London' (1792-1961) to tail edge of ffep verso. A few small bookseller's notes pencilled to front endpapers. First Baskerville edition of Terence's Comedies; they were printed on the press' better 'Writing Royal' paper and sold for a Guinea each (a 12mo. was produced in the same year on cheaper paper). Terence (d. 159 B.C.) was born into slavery at Carthage and brought to Rome, where he was freed, taking his old master's name. His six comedies, which stand out for their particular naturalistic style, were admired right through the Middle Ages for their moral arguments, and were still on school curricula in the nineteenth century. Gaskell, 'Baskerville', * 46 (p. 58). ESTC T137489. Dibdin (4th edn.) II 477. Schweiger III 1070. Graesse VI.2 61. Brunet V 718.   Ref: 51890 
£250
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[Terence] Terentius Afer, Publius: (Westerhovius, A.H.:) Comoediae Sex, ad fidem duodecim amplius Msstorum Codicum, et pluscularum optimae notae Editionum recensitae, et Commentario Perpetuo illustratae [...] Curavit Arn. Henr. Westerhovius. Hagae-Comitum [The Hague]: Apud Thomam Johnsonium, 1726. 2 vols., 4to, pp. [x], lxxxix, 859, [i]; [ii], [861]-1240, 244, [ccclxxx] + engraved dedication pages in both vols., a frontispiece in vol. 1, and 47 plates (these last from another work). Some toning and spotting.Contemporary sprinkled calf spines divided by gilt rolls, red morocco labels, edges yellow. Spines somewhat rubbed, some small scratches to boards. 'This is a sumptuous and valuable edition' (Dibdin), which has been made even more so by the inclusion of 47 engraved plates depicting Terentian scenes or Roman theatrical masks, all from an octavo volume and mounted on quarto sheets to fit, with the page references amended by hand. Dibdin II 475.   Ref: 53247 
£400
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Theocritus: Quae extant. Ex editione Danielis Heinsii expressa. Glasguae [Glasgow]: In aedibus Academicis excudebant Robertus et Andreas Foulis, 1746. Pot 4to, pp. [xii], 32, 45-192 (as called for). Early 20th-century sprinkled calf by R. Nelson, boards bordered with a double gilt rules, spine divided by raised bands between double gilt rules, central gilt tools in compartments. Some light soiling in places. Rebacked preserving most of original backstrip, around 40 binders' blanks at end, edges rubbed, some scrapes to boards. Bookplate of Jacob Bennett Miller to front pastedown. The pot 4to issue containing just the Greek text, conjectured by Gaskell in his first edition and confirmed by Brian Gerrard for Gaskell's second edition: gatherings A and B signed are with * and the paper has a Royal Arms watermark. The first bifolium is oddly trimmed (or oddly imposed), with the inner margin substantially larger than the outer. This was the first book in which Andrew Foulis's name appears with Robert's as University Printer. Gaskell 78; ESTC T138485.   Ref: 53248 
£250
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Theophrastus: (Budgell, Eustace, trans.:) The Moral Characters [...] Translated from the Greek. London: printed for Jacob Tonson, 1714. First edition.12mo., pp. [xxvi], 80, [iv], including portrait frontispiece. With two final advertisement leaves and p.79 misnumbered as p.89. Some woodcut decorations. A few faint ink smudges to frontis and title but otherwise clean. Contemporary brown calf Cambridge panelled boards, neatly rebacked with heavily gilt spine and red morocco title label, edges lightly sprinkled red, corners repaired, hinges subtly reinforced. A few slight scrapes, some patches of toning to endpapers but a very good copy. Armorial bookplate of John Cator to front paste-down, likely John Cator the landowner, timber merchant and MP (1728-1806) who commissioned the building of Beckenham Place Mansion in 1773. He was described by Fanny Burney as 'a good-natured busy sort of man' (The Diary and Letters of Madame D'Arblay, Vol. 1.). To ffep, recent bookplate of Robert J. Hayhurst. MS inscription of J[ohn] Lydall of Uxmore in Oxfordshire, dated 1768 to title-page verso. Translated by jobbing writer and sometime Member of Parliament for Mullingar, Eustace Budgell (1687-1737). In his Preface he writes that he has not in fact 'translated from the Greek' at all but has used Bruyere's French translation as his starting point. He is surprisingly scathing about his own work: 'As for our English translation, I shall say no more of it, but that it is wholly done from the French, and as it always happens in a Translation of a Translation, is everywhere flat and spiritless'. He goes on to rather unfairly place the blame for his translations's deficiencies on Bruyere: 'It might perhaps be thought too hard if I should say Monsieur Bruyere was afraid of having Theophrastus outshine himself; yet I shall make no Scruple to affirm that the Method he has used in translating him has very much taken from the Beauty of his Author.' Budgell was a cousin of Joseph Addision and assisted him with The Spectator with some success, though he later fell on hard times. Thought vain and vindictive by many of his contemporaries, he is now mostly remembered for his death: he threw himself into the Thames, leaving a note that read 'What Cato did, and Addison approved, cannot be wrong.' ESTC T86597   Ref: 51609 
£225
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