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Paris, Matthew: (Watts, William, ed.:) Historia Major. Juxta Exemplar Londinense 1640. verbatim recusa [...] Huic Editione accesserunt, duorum Offarum Merciorum Regum; & viginti trium Abbatum S. Albani Vitae: una cum Libro Additamentorum. Londini [London], Impensis A. Mearne, T. Dring, B. Tooke, T. Sawbridge, & G. Wells 1684. Folio, pp. [xxxiv], 424, 451-859, 856-861, [i], [xcvi], [xii], 961-1048, 1041-1175, [xxxvii] + portrait frontispiece. With all usual errors in pagination. The section titled 'Adversaria sive Variantes Lectiones' and the Indices are bound after the main part of the text, instead of at the beginning as in the ESTC copy. Title in red and black with woodcut device, some woodcut initials. A few tiny smudges and wax spots, small blue ink mark to lower margin of frontis, short closed tear to lower margin pp.695-6. Contemporary dark brown mottled calf, sturdily rebacked, raised bands, gilt title label, edges sprinkled red. Very scuffed, edges worn but corners repaired, a very good, sound copy overall. Reprint of the first complete edition of Matthew Paris' works. Watts added to Archbishop Parker's edition of the 'Historia Major' (1571) Matthew's unpublished minor works (real and suppositious), besides his own notes on variant readings and parallel sources (Roger Wendover, William Rishanger, and others). He produced overall an impressive piece of early modern English historical scholarship, complete with glossary and index. Matthew Paris (d. 1259), a historian and the official chronicler at St. Alban's monastery, was a favourite of King Henry III, and a sharp reporter on contemporary political life. Watts (1590-1649) was also chaplain to Prince Rupert of the Rhine, the Civil War commander. Wing P 359; ESTC R25517   Ref: 51274 
£350
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Paulus Diaconus; Lipsius, J: Pauli Warnefridi Langobardi Filii, Diaconi Foroiuliensis, De Gestis Langobardorum Libri VI. Ad MS, & Veterum Codicum Fidem Editi; De Recta Pronunciatione Latinae Linguae Dialogus. Lugduni Batavorum [Leiden], Ex Officina Plantiniana, Apud Franciscum Raphelengium, 1595; [c.1586]. 12mo., pp. [xii], 337, [i]; [ii], 96, [viii]. Woodcut device to title page of first work. Slightly toned with some occasional foxing, small scorch mark to text p.16 (no loss of sense), preliminary blanks and one leaf loosening. Some underlining to one page in second section. Later vellum, possibly retaining old boards, ink title to spine, Yapp edges, edges sprinkled red. Endcaps creased, a little darkened at fore-edge but otherwise bright, pastedowns lifting to reveal manuscript binder's waste. Some booksellers notes and a pasted catalogue entry to front paste-down. Two works bound together: the first is the major work of Paul the Deacon, his History of the Lombards, in an edition published by Plantin - the first edited by Fr. Linbenbrog; the second work is an anonymous edition of Lipsius's study on the correct pronunciation of Latin. Adams, p.499   Ref: 46592  show full image..
£675
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(Phaedrus:) 'Aesop': (Desbillons, Francois-Joseph, ed.:) Fabulae Aesopiae, curis posterioribus omnes fere emendatae:accesserunt plus quam clxx nove. [...]. Mannhemii et Parisiis [Mannheim and Paris]: Apud J. Barbou, 1768. 8vo. 2 vols. [2], 290pp.; [4], [291-] 615pp., [1]. Additional engraved frontispieces, 15 full-page engraved plates. Occasional very minor toning, I) lower outer blank corner of C3 minimally torn. Contemporary mottled calf, marbled endpapers, raised bands, spines gilt ruled into six compartments, gilt large fleuron to five, one with gilt-lettered morocco label, a.e.r. Extremities a little rubbed, I) upper joint cracked but firm, small loss to upper cover, II) upper joint repaired. Bookplate of Rev. H. Campbell to front pastedowns. Elegantly bound Latin edition of Aesop's "Fables" by the Jesuit poet François-Joseph Desbillons (1711-89), author of several other collections of ancient and modern fables. Brunet II, 607. Not in Dibdin.   Ref: 53150  show full image..
£250
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[Plautus] Plautus, Titus Maccius: (Pareus, Philippus, ed.:) Comoediae XX superstites et deperditarum fragmenta. Francof. [Frankfurt]: Philip Jacob Fisher, 1641. 8vo. 3 parts in 1, pp. [224], 826, [2], 31, [1], 85, [1], with engraved title. Title in red and black with engraved vignette, woodcut vignette to verso of last. Title dusty, some scattered foxing or dampstaining, small paper flaw and minor clean tear to outer blank margin of two leaves. Contemporary vellum over boards, yapp edges. 'The last edition of [Johannes Philippus] Paré in which were corrected several criticised passages of the previous editions' (Graesse V, 328-29). In addition to Plautus's twenty comedies, it features numerous fragments, 'Querolus' and 'Animadversionum ablegmina'. Graesse V, 328-29. Not in Dibdin.   Ref: 53281  show full image..
£250
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[Pliny the Elder:] Plinius Secundus, Gaius: (De Laet, J., ed.:) Historiae Naturalis Libri XXXVII. Lugduni Batavorum [Leiden]: ex officina Elzeviriana, 1635. First edition. 3 vols., 12mo, pp. [xxiv], 654, [xviii]; 631, [xvii]; 582, [xviii]. Engraved titlepage, small woodcut portrait of Pliny. With 'variae lectiones' and indexes at end of each vol. Slight toning, occasional minor spots, titles dusty, 1: one lower outer blank corner minimally torn, 2: small loss to lower blank margin of one leaf. Full blue morocco c.1800, signed by C. Hering (binder's ticket), blind-tooled, straight-grained calf doublures with gilt edges, raised bands, spines gilt-lettered, a.e.g. (boards and joints rubbed, free endpapers soiled). Later annotation to original rear endpaper. The first Elzevier edition of Pliny's 'Natural History', which became extremely popular with later collectors. De Laet was a Leiden historian and editor who wrote or produced a number of texts for the Elzevir press. In the dedication, to the lawyer and French royal counsellor Jerome Bignon (1589-1656), he states that he drew on the edition of Claude Saumaise. Willems 428; Dibdin (3rd edn.) II, 323.   Ref: 53181  show full image..
£600
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[Quintilian] Quintilianus, Marcus Fabius: (Spalding, Georg Ludwig, ed.:) De Institutione Oratoria libri duodecim ad codicum veterum fidem recensuit et annotatione explanavit Georg. Ludovicus Spalding A.M. Gymnasii Berolino-Coloniensis professor [...] Lipsiae [Leipzig]: Sumtibus Siegfried Lebrecht Crusii (Vols. I-IV); Sumptibus Frid. Christ. Guil. Vo 1798-1834. 6 vols., 8vo., pp. lxxxvi, 628, [iv]; viii, 652, [ii]; xii, 646, [ii]; xviii, [iv], 718, [ii]; xxviii, 478, [ii]; lxxxiv, 1042, [ii]. Publisher's list to final page verso, vol. I. Vol. VI has additional title-page facing t.p. proper: 'Lexicon Quintilianeum edidit Eduardus Bonnellus Gymnasii Berolinensis professoris'. Occasional spots of foxing but generally bright, small closed tear to vol. IV title-page. Mid 20th-century half light tan calf, red morocco spine labels, red marbled paper boards, edges lightly sprinkled brown, contrasting marbled endpapers. Some patchy colour variation to spines (possibly from injudicious use of leather dressing), a little rubbed but a very good set. To the flyleaf of each volume, 'David M. Gaunt (Re-bound, Jan. 1968)'. This is likely the classicist David Martin Gaunt who served at Bletchley Park during WWII (see the 'Roll of Honour' on the Bletchley website) and published an edition of Quintilian in 1952. An additional crossed-through ownership inscription to vol. I. An edition much praised by Dibdin (writing of the first four volumes): 'It was wish of Ernesti that some ingenious and erudite scholar, "florens adhuc aetate," would favour the classical world with a complete edition of Quintilian [...]. The above excellent production of Spalding seems to have realised this wish.' Dibdin II 4th edn. 371   Ref: 50392  show full image..
£390
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Rapin, Rene: Les Artifices des Heretiques Paris: Chez Sebastien Mabre-Cramoisy. 1681. 12mo. pp. [xii], 444. Woodcut vignette to title. Small clean tear from outer edge of p.271, few leaves a trifle browned or dampstained. Contemporary sprinkled calf, raised bands, spine triple gilt ruled, gilt fleurons and tendrils, all edges sprinkled red. Boards and outer edges rubbed. A rather vigorous Jesuit diatribe against Jansenism as an heretical imposture, listing the 24 psychological techniques and social behaviours by which Jansenists pass themselves off as 'saintly people'.   Ref: 53164  show full image..
£200
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Ross, Alexander: [Davies, John, trans.:] [Greek letters] Pansebeia: or, A View of all Religions in the world: with the several church-governments, from the creation to these times. Also, a discovery of all known heresies in all ages and places: and choice observations & reflections throughout th [with] Apocalypsis: or, the revelation of certain notorious advancers of heresie [...] London: printed by Sarah Griffin for J.S [...], 1664. 2 parts in 1. 8vo., pp. [xxxii], 544, [xxxii], 78, [ii], including engraved portrait frontispiece by Lombart. MS longitudinal half-title, 'Ross his View of Religions'. Woodcut initials, second part with separate title-page, 3A1 and 3a4 blanks, and several engraved portraits in the text. Dampstain to fore-edge margin of frontis and half-title, diminishing through the first gathering, ink smudge to p.182 obscuring a couple of words, tiny wormhole to final leaf affecting a few letters, gathering 2N (a table) cropped close with slight loss at fore-edge in some places, occasional light spots and smudges. Recent tan morocco, red gilt title label to spine, gilt and carbon-tooled borders with small carbon-tooled centrepiece to each board, edges coloured red, endpapers renewed. Spine slightly creased, very light shelf-wear, a very good copy in a competent modern binding. Fourth edition of Ross' (1591–1654) Pansebia (first published 1652), to which is added the third edition of Apocalypsis (first edition in English, 1655). Apocalypsis was translated by John Davies from the Latin edition, Apocalypsis insignium aliquot hæresiarcharvm (Leiden, 1608), which was taken from the Dutch original, Growelen der vornemsten hooft-ketteren by H. L. van Haestens (Leiden, 1607). ESTC R218401; Wing R1974 & 1945A   Ref: 52188  show full image..
£375
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Rymer, Thomas: The Tragedies of the Last Age, Consider'd and Examin'd by the Practice of the Ancients, and by the Common Sense of all Ages in a Letter to Fleetwood Shepheard, Esq. London: Printed and are to be sold by Richard Baldwin [...] 1692. 2nd edition. 8vo., pp. [xvi], 144. Imprimatur leaf opposite title page dated July 17 1677, half-page printer's advertisement to final leaf verso. Fore-edge corner of title-page repaired at head, small rust mark near head of p.1, closed tear to bottom edge pp. 39-40 affecting bottom 4 lines of text but with no loss, a little grubby towards edges, occasional spots of foxing. Recent half tan morocco, raised bands and gilt title to spine, marbled boards, edges coloured red, endpapers renewed. Spine lightly sunned, a little dusty, very good. An MS note on Thomas Rymer to the imprimatur leaf recto; to the verso, inscription of (Charles?) Callan dated 1785, 'Ex. Lib.' with the name then removed, and a small note '2nd part never published'. The title-page identifies this as 'Part I', but in fact the old note is correct that no further parts were published. The first edition appeared in 1678 without 'Part I' on the title page. In this critical essay Thomas Rymer (1642/3–1713) identifies what he believes to be 'the choicest and most applauded English Tragedies of that last age; as Rollo; A King and No King; the Maid's Tragedy, by Beaumont and Fletcher; Othello, Julius Cæsar, by Shakespeare; and Cataline by Worthy Ben', and considers them in the context of classical tragedy. 'Rymer managed to rehearse the plots of the first three plays (Rollo is of uncertain authorship) and to analyse the plays according to his views on how tragedy should be written. He advocated strict compliance with the theory of decorum—characters were stereotyped, with soldiers being courageous; women, modest. Poetical justice demanded that the good be rewarded, the evil punished. Plots should not be improbable; plays should have a moral.' (ODNB) Indeed, Rymer is credited with coining the expression 'poetic justice'. ESTC R7998; Wing R2431   Ref: 52268  show full image..
£225
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[Sallust] Crispus, Caius Sallustius: Caii Sallustii Crispi quae exstant opera. Parisiis [Paris]: Typis J. Barbou, 1761. 12mo. pp. (xxxvi) 348. Added engraved frontispiece, 3 engraved plates, woodcut and engraved ornaments. Plates bit dusty or slightly browned. Contemporary marbled calf, marbled endpapers, gilt ruled, spine gilt and lettered, marbled edges. Joints a trifle rubbed. Elegantly bound small-format Parisian edition, first published in 1754 by Jean Barbou. A fresh, clean copy. Brunet V, 87. Not in Dibdin.   Ref: 53285  show full image..
£125
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