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Severus, Sulpicius: Opera Omnia. quae extant. Amstelodami [Amsterdam]: Ex officina Elzeviriana, 1656. 12mo. 332pp., [4]. Engraved title, decorated initials and ornaments. Title and verso of last leaf dusty, one small marginal tear to title. Contemporary (Welsh?) sprinkled calf, blind ruled with arabesque cornerpieces in blind, raised bands. Joints a bit cracked but firm, covers little rubbed. Ex-libris of William Lhwyd to flyleaf. 'Re-imprint line by line of the edition produced by the Elzevirs of Leiden in 1643', 'very nice' (Willems 1207). Willems 1207.   Ref: 53176  show full image..
£150
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Shrubsole, William & Denne, Samuel; Fisher, Thomas, ed. The History and Antiquities of Rochester and its environs: To which is added a Description of the Towns, Villages, Gentlemen's Seats, and Ancient Buildings [...]. Rochester: Printed and sold by T. Fisher, 1772. First edition. 8vo. pp. [xiv], 353, [1]. With 1 folding map and 5 plates, few small illustrations. Small clean tear to lower blank margin of one leaf, title and verso of last a bit dusty, last few leaves somewhat foxed. Modern quarter calf over marbled boards, spine gilt, gilt-lettered label to spine. Stamp of Woods, Forests & Lands Revenue to title. First edition of this beautifully illustrated history of Rochester. William Shrubsole (1729–1797) was an English nonconformist minister, author of works on subjects as varied as local history, theology and even the Sheerness dockyards, where he was employed. The present work discusses the history of Rochester from the 11th century, lingering on its most important monuments. It was finished by the antiquary Samuel Denne, with the assistance of Thomas Fisher, printer, bookseller and alderman of Rochester. The initial folding map, with a plan of the city, also marks the ruins of the fire of 1768. ESTC T63426.   Ref: 53275  show full image..
£125
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Solerius Cemeliensis, Anselmus, pseud. [Raynaud, Théophile]; (Frisius, Andreas Wilhelmus, ed.): Bosso, Girolamo: De pileo cæterisque capitis tegminibus tam sacris, quàm profanis. Editio novissima aucta, emendata & figuris æneis exornata; [bound with] De toga romana commentarivs, Accedit ex Philippo Rvbenio iconismus statuae togatae, et praeter indicem geminum, quem adjecimus, De modo gestandi togam ex Ferrario dissertatio. Amstelodami [Amseterdam]: sumptibus Andreæ Frisii, 1671; 1671. 2 works bound as 1, often found together. 12mo., pp. [xii], 379, [xli] + 4 plates, including 3 folding; 84, [xii] + 1 folding plate. De Pileo with engraved title-page and second title-page with vignette (both part of first gathering), many engraved illustrations several of which occupy a full page, with final blank leaf. Very slightly toned but clean, short repaired tear to De Toga Romana's folding plate at gutter. Contemporary vellum, title inked to spine, edges sprinkled red. A few marks and smudges, corners very mildly rubbed, a very good copy indeed. Solerius' De Pileo is a curious work on hats and headgear, pseudonymously published by the French Jesuit theologian Théophile Raynaud (1583-1663). Amongst the numerous illustrations, the engraved title-page is signed by Romeyn de Hooghe; one folded plate is signed by Cornelis Galle. This 'new edition' of 1671 followed its original publication in Leiden in 1655. Here, it is found paired with the second edition of Girolamo Bosso's work on Roman secular and clerical togas, which made its first appearance in Pavia in 1614. Lipperheide 1650; Barbier III 700 & Lipperheide 220; Colas 399   Ref: 52285  show full image..
£500
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Statius, Publius Papinius: (Stephens, Thomas, trans.:) An Essay Upon Statius: or, the Five First Books of Publ. Papinius Statius his Thebais. Done Into English Verse by T.S. With the Poetick History Illustrated. London: printed for Richard Royston, 1648. First edition. 8vo., pp.[xiv], 152 including portrait frontispiece. Bound without preliminary blanks. Woodcut headpieces. Small burn hole to leaf C4 affecting a couple of lettters, a few small spots and smudges. 19th-century tan polished calf, neatly rebacked with original spine retained, two black morocco and gilt labels to spine, edges sprinkled grey, some pencilled bibliographical notes to endpapers, A few scrapes to lower board, corners a little worn, but still very good. Bookplate of Christopher Rowe to front paste-down. From the library of Thomas Park (1758/9–1834), antiquary and bibliographer, with his signature to the title-page but sadly without the heavy annotation for which he was known. The first translation of Statius into English. Stephens (d.1677), headmaster of the grammar school at Bury St Edmunds, claims in the prefatory material that the translation is purely for use by his students. Indeed, it does serve to as introduction to Statius' poetry during a time 'increasingly hostile to his aesthetics as well as to his politics'. However, this claim is shown to be a little disingenuous, as Stephens' Royalist sympathies are quite apparent in his translation. He 'seems to have seen in Statius' Thebaid a poem for his times that, translated, could provide an oblique commentary on English politics and the crisis of monarchy.' (Brill's Companion to Statius, p.603) This work appears at a fraught point in the career of its publisher Richard Royston, 'staunch supporter of the church and the crown'. Imprisoned in the Fleet from July to October of 1645 for issuing an anti-parliament parody of Robert Ram's Soldier's Catechism, by 1648 he was embroiled in the controversial publication of Eikon Basilike, allegedly written by Charles I during his incarceration. 'Royston's involvement with the publication had begun earlier and by the end of 1648 he contrived to get Eikon into print, using a series of printers, and began distributing it. Although it has been suggested that he was imprisoned for publishing the King's Book, there is no evidence of this. However, in October 1649, nine months after the execution of Charles I, Royston was called before the council of state and was bound in £500 to appear 'when required, and not to print or sell any unlicensed books or pamphlets in the meantime' (CSP dom., 1649–50, 524).' (ODNB) ESTC R21944; Wing S5335   Ref: 51516  show full image..
£950
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Strabo: (Almeloveen, Theodorus Jansonius, ed.:) Geographia cum notis Casauboni et aliorum. Amstelaedami [Amsterdam]: apud J. Wolters, 1707. 2 vols. Folio, pp. [xliv], 677, [i]; [ii], 681-1329 [xcix] + errata leaf at end. With half-title and engraved frontispiece. Greek and Roman letter (double column in text), engraved title vignette and one other illustrations in text, title page in red and black. Intermittent slight age browning, edges dusty, occasional very minor marginal foxing, I: small tear to lower blank margin of one leaf, couple of oil or damp stains to upper and outer blank margins of two gatherings, browning a trifle heavier to last gathering, II: leaf with pp.1199-1200 trimmed to outer margin, slightly adhering to gutter of previous leaf, perhaps supplied from another copy, small repair to lower outer blank corner to 5K4, light water stain and minor foxing to outer blank margin of few gatherings. Contemporary Dutch blind-stamped vellum, modern reback in vellum, later endpapers, blind-stamped lozenge-shaped centrepiece with interlacing ribbons, raised bands, gilt-lettered morocco labels, covers a bit soiled and rubbed. Late 18th-century bookseller's note inked to fly; gilt institutional stamp at foot of spines. The text of Casaubon's second edition of Strabo with the notes from all those previous: it contains even their original dedications, and, according to Dibdin, words that were omitted in Casaubon's own edition. This is testament to a colossal care in amassing the commentating history, this edition "being considered one of the best produced of this author" (Brunet). The 'Geographies' of Strabo are considered "by far the most important source for ancient geography, a priceless document of the Augustan age, and a compendium of important material derived from lost authors" (OCD). Almeloveen, the compiler, is otherwise known as a medical writer. Dibdin (4th edn.) II, pp. 433-434; Brunet V, 554.   Ref: 53363  show full image..
£850
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Tacitus, Publius Cornelius: [...] Opera, Quae Extant. Integris J. Lipsii, Rhenani, Ursini, Mureti, Pichenae, Merceri, Gruteri, Acidalii, Grotii, Freinshemii, & selectis aliorum commentariis illustrata. Joh. Fred. Gronovius recensuit, & suas notas passim adjecit. Accedunt Jacobi Gronovii exc Amstelodami [Amsterdam]: Daniel Elzevir, 1672. 2 vols. 8vo, pp. [xxxii], 1224; [ii], 899, [xi], [ccxxiii]. Additional engraved title-page to first vol., woodcut device to title-page, woodcut head & tail pieces & initials. Occasional light foxing, small loss to fore-edge margin of engraved title-page, vol. II with one front endpaper excised and a marginal scorch-hole to Y7. Late 19th-century red straight-grain morocco, spines and boards blind tooled, gilt titles, a.e.g, green endpapers. Joints, endcaps and corners a bit rubbed, a few faint spots and smudges but very good overall. To front paste-down of each volume a 20th-century bookplate of James Elwin Millard. To front paste-down of vol. I, small bookseller's ticket of Edward Rainford of 12 Red Lion Passage. To preliminary blank, MS extract from Dibdin. Described by Dibdin as more 'beautiful and valuable' than the 1685 Bleau edition, though he observes that the Bipont editors consider that 'its accuracy is not equal to its beauty'. Contains the notes of various commentators including J.F. Gronovius, who unfortunately died before the work was completed. Willems 1479; Dibdin II (4th ed.) 453   Ref: 52212  show full image..
£600
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Tacitus, Publius(?) Cornelius: (Opera) Cum optimis exemplaribus collatus, adiecti sunt capitulorum numeri. Amstelodami [Amsterdam]: Typis Danielis Elzevirii, 1665. 24mo, pp. 624, [24]. Late 19th-century sprinkled calf, boards bordered with a triple gilt rule, spine divided by gilt rules, red morocco label, other compartments with either small central flower tool or infilled with a diaper pattern in gilt, marbled endpapers, edges sprinkled blue and red. Cut a little close by the binder with some headlines shaved (particularly in the index). Extremities rubbed, corners a touch worn, a small spot of insect damage to upper joint. The second pocket-format Elzevir edition of Tacitus, a line-for-line reprint of the 1649 first. Willems 1364.   Ref: 53244 
£150
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Tacitus, Publius(?) Cornelius: Opera: ad fidem optimarum editionum expressa. Edinburgi [Edinburgh]: Apud Bell & Bradfute, J. Dickson, et T. Duncan, 1792. 2 vols, 12mo, pp. xii, 384; [ii], 410. Contemporary tree calf, spine divided by double gilt rules, red morocco labels. Some minor spotting, a dampmark to foot of index in vol. 2. Extremities a touch rubbed, slight cracking to ends of joints. Ownership stamp of Robert Montgomery, Convoy, to front pastedowns, with his ownership inscription to title-page of vol. 1. A pleasant and unsophisticated binding, perhaps Irish, on a scarce Edinburgh printing of the works of Tacitus. The early owner Robert Montgomery is from a significant family of Ulster Scots who settled in Convoy, County Donegal. ESTC locates 5 copies of this edition in the UK (Birmingham, BL, NLS, NLW, National Trust), the same again in the USA, and one in Amsterdam. ESTC T96040.   Ref: 53246  show full image..
£150
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Tacitus, Publius(?) Cornelius: (Ernesti, J.A., ed.:) Opera iterum recensuit. Notas integras Iusti Lipsii, I.F. Gronovii, Nic. Heinsii et suas addidit Io. Augustus Ernesti. Lipsiae [Leipzig]: Apud Weidmanii Haered. et Reichium, 1772. 2 vols., 8vo, pp. lvi, [vi], 896; 752, [176] + engraved frontispiece in vol. 1. Contemporary speckled calf, smooth spines divided by double gilt rules, black morocco labels, other compartments with central gilt tools (or gilt numbered direct within a circular frame), marbled endpapers. Poorquality paper rather browned and foxed. Leather somewhat rubbed and crackled but since polished. An attractive copy of the second Ernesti edition after the first of 1757, being 'the more copious edition' of the pair; in both 'the preface, notes, and indexes, will be found interesting and useful; many obscure passages are explained' (Dibdin). Dibdin II 455.   Ref: 53245  show full image..
£200
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Tanner, Thomas: Notitia Monastica: Or, an Account of all the Abbies, Priories, and Houses of Friers, heretofore in England and Wales; and also of all the Colleges and Hospitals founded before A.D. MDXL. London: Printed by William Bowyer, at the expense of the Society for the Encouragement of Learning, 1744. Folio, pp. [iv] xliv [x] 722 [liv] + frontispiece with folding portrait engraved by George Vertue, and three engraved plates with arms of monasteries. Frontispiece trimmed to lower margin and strengthened at gutter, title and first leaf a bit soiled at outer margin and gutter, slight yellowing, very minor marginal foxing, upper edge dusty with intermittent damp stain, also to outer margin of last few leaves, small worm trail to lower blank margin of few leaves. Contemporary polished calf, rebacked, later endpapers, double gilt ruled, original gilt-lettered morocco labels, one titled, the other dated 1744 around a gilt-stamp horse head, onlaid. A bit rubbed. Armorial bookplate of John Mirehouse to front pastedown. Second edition of this important study on all the abbeys, priories and 'houses of friers' of England and Wales, written by by Thomas Tanner (1674-1735), Bishop of St. Asaph. The previous edition had appeared in octavo in 1695 after which Tanner commenced work on an expanded version, completed posthumously with revisions by his brother John. The horse head, gilt-stamped to spine label, is the stamp of Sir John Fenn (1739–1794), Norfolk antiquary and first editor of the Paston Letters. Graesse VI 25; Lowndes 2572; ESTC T97254.   Ref: 53182  show full image..
£280
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