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Anon. [Lowndes, William:] A Report Containing an Essay for the Amendment of the Silver Coins. London: printed by Charles Bill, and the Executrix of Thomas Newcomb, deceas'd; Printers to the King 1695. First edition. 8vo., pp. 159, [i]. Woodcut initials. Slight dampstain along bottom margin occasionally affecting (though not obscuring) text, title-page a little grubby but otherwise only occasional light spots and smudges. Modern tan half calf, red morocco gilt title label to spine, marbled boards, endpapers renewed. A very good copy in a sound modern binding. The Essay is divided into five distinct points: 'First, Concerning the Standard of the Gold and Silver Coins, and the Establishment of a Just and Reasonable Foot for the Course of the same'; 'Second, Concerning the Present State and Condition of the Gold and Silver Coins'; 'Third, Whether it be or be not Absolutely necessary at this Time to Re-establish the same'; 'Fourth, The Proposing of Means that must be Obtained, and the Proper Methods to be used in and for the Amendment of the Silver Moneys'; 'Fifth, To Consider what must Supply the Commerce, Pay Taxes &c. Whilst the Clipt Money is under its New Fabrication.' (pp.11-13) Lowndes (1652-1724) took office as secretary of the Treasury on 24th April 1695 in the midst of a worsening coinage crisis which the government was already making efforts to resolve. 'The practice of 'clipping' hammered silver coin had reached the point where it was seriously affecting the Treasury's ability to pay its way in the war with France, and in late 1694 confidence in the silver coinage weakened dramatically. A complete reminting of the coinage was now imperative, but the problem facing a House of Commons committee early in 1695 was whether there should be a temporary devaluation in order to stabilize the currency while the old money was reminted, a primary concern being to offset the inevitable loss in the value of tax receipts.' (ODNB) As Lowndes and the philosopher John Locke published opposing views on the subject (Lowndes in favour of devaluation and Locke against) the episode came to be referred to by historians as 'the Locke-Lowndes controversy'. However more recent studies have suggested that the views published here under Lowndes name on behalf of the Treasury were not actually his own. 'In a written report to the Treasury board in January 1695 Lowndes actually ruled out any suggestion of devaluation. While modestly conceding a limited grasp of the complexities behind the issue, he envisaged an immediate loss of some £150,000 in revenue, which would have to be met by a 'public tax', and a worrying increase in the cost of England's military payments abroad.' (Ibid). The Treasury board asked Lowndes to produce a detailed recoinage scheme but, 'since majority opinion on the board favoured devaluation it would appear that Lowndes was instructed to follow the scheme already proposed by the Commons. By mid-September his 'book', A Report Containing an Essay for the Amendment of the Silver Coins, was in Treasury hands. It embodied the Commons committee's resolutions and was fleshed out with much historical detail, but owing to the rapid increase in the market price of silver a devaluation rate of 20 per cent would now be necessary. William III and his ministers acknowledged Lowndes's ingenuity and scholarship but, disagreeing with the Treasury board, saw greater virtue in Locke's arguments for a recoinage at the old standard. Thus it was largely to assist the ministry's own scheme for recoinage in parliament that Lowndes's Report was subsequently published in November 1695, followed by Locke's Further Considerations Concerning Raising the Value of Money. While paying tribute to Lowndes's erudition, Locke was quick to point out that some of his arguments tended in fact to condemn devaluation of any kind. Moreover, the encouragement which Lowndes gave to Locke and other critics to publish their rebuttals of his Report would likewise suggest that Lowndes had never personally favoured devaluation. In January 1696 an act was passed for a recoinage at the existing standard.' (Ibid.) ESTC R39081; Wing (2nd ed.) L3323   Ref: 52379 
£350
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[Anon.] A Modest Enquiry into the Causes of the Present Disasters in England. And who they are that brought the French Fleet into the English Channel, Described. London: printed for Richard Baldwin in the Old-Baily. 1690. 4to., pp. [ii], 38. Bound without final blank leaf as usual (see ESTC). Title-page within double line border, short bookseller's catalogue to lower half of final page. Lightly toned and softened at fore-edge with some slight greyish spotting, title-page fore-edge a little ragged, light dampstain to bottom edge of last 4 leaves. Modern blue paper-covered boards, narrow vellum spine, orange spine label with 'Disasters' in gilt. A very good copy. Authorship of this work concerning a naval victory by France that was supposedly made possible by treachery is often attributed to Daniel Defoe, although Walter Wilson writes in his Memoirs of the Life and Times of Daniel Defoe (1830) that this is 'probably without any just reason'. He does however consider the work, 'well written, and a useful document of the times. The design of the author is to identify the disaffected clergy with the plot that was in activity against the government; in order to which, he gives a curious detail of their proceedings, and adduces a memorial which they presented to the French King, inviting him to the invasion of England.' (Ibid). Issuing this pamphlet earned its publisher Richard Baldwin a prison sentence. 'With the accession of William III, Baldwin, as a loyal supporter, was prepared to serve the government through the medium of his press. Yet the candor of his publications and his own impulsive behavior were to bring him into occasional conflict with the government he so heartily championed. In 1690 Baldwin was sentenced to Newgate for "misprision of treason" by Lord Daniel Finch, Second Earl of Nottingham, for having "publish'd a sticht book entitled a Modest Enquiry which reflects upon the dissenting bishops and other bold passages." Copies of the pamphlet were seized by "Robin Hog" Stevens, but the indefatigable Baldwin, again ready with bail, was released from sentence.' (Rostenberg, 'Richard and Anne Baldwin, Whig Patriot Publishers' in The Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America Vol. 47, No. 1 (First Quarter, 1953), pp. 1-42). Between 1689 and 1698 Baldwin published about 240 pamphlets, the majority being political and of those 75 being anti-French. 'The principal butt of these lampoons and libels was the aging monarch at Versailles whose limitless passion for war and territorial aggrandizement had left France bankrupt, her manhood destroyed and her people apathetic and indifferent to the future. The growing fear of a possible French invasion and the English contempt for Louis XIV are manifest in Baldwin's many libellous tracts' (ibid). ESTC R16429; Wing M2367   Ref: 52381 
£150
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Barber, Richard: Edward III and the Triumph of England. London: Allen Lane, 2013. First edition. 8vo., pp. xxii, 650. Black cloth, a hint of shelf-wear but still fine. Dust-jacket, a couple of tiny closed tears and moderate creasing to top edge, still very good.   Ref: 53009 
£15
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[Cromwell, Thomas Kitson: (Hawkesworth; Gatineau et al, illus.:] Excursions in the County of Kent: comprising brief historical and topographical delineations; together with descriptions of the residences of the nobility and gentry, remains of antiquity, and other interesting objects of curiosity. Forming a complete guide for the traveller & touris London: Printed for Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown; J. Greig, Back Road, Islington; and P. Yo 1822. 8vo., pp. [iv], 192 + 50 plates, including folding map frontispiece and additional engraved title-page. Occasional very light spots of foxing, last few leaves a little toned. 20th-century deep red straight-grain morocco, raised bands, gilt spine with gilt border and frame to each board, top edge gilt and other edges uncut, purple endpapers. Very faint rubbing at head and tail of each joint, a very good copy handsomely bound. Some pencilled collector's or perhaps bookseller's notes to ffep verso. The additional engraved title-page states 'Vol. 1', but no more were issued (Cromwell writes in his Preface that 'the projected length of each of these volumes has been diminished one half'). Originally issued in numbers in the author's series Excursions through England and Wales, Scotland and Ireland. The title-page states that the book is 'illustrated with fifty engravings', and indeed it is. However two of the plates (opposite p.160 and p.188) are engravings from Excursions from Ireland that don't belong in this volume at all. Having compared this copy with others online we cannot find any plates lacking in this volume and so would suggest that 48 plates was in fact the norm, and that at some point two stray plates have been added here in order to make up the numbers. Divided into three excursions, each giving interesting historical and contemporary facts about the towns and cities discussed. Includes areas now thought of as South London, including Deptford and Greenwich.   Ref: 52385 
£400
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Croston, James: A History of the Ancient Hall of Samlesbury in Lancashire, with an Account of its Earlier Possessors and Particulars Relating to the More Recent Descent of the Manor. London: printed by Whittingham and Wilkins at the Chiswick Press, 1871. Folio (385 x 280mm), pp. x, [ii], 274 + 1 folding facsimile indenture, 3 folding pedigrees, 1 ground plan and 2 further engraved plates. Title page in red and black, further engravings in the text. Sporadic foxing with the endpapers and the 2 engraved plates most affected. Dark green textured morocco, gilt spine, ornate borders and dentelles, a.e.g., marbled endpapers. Endcaps a little worn, some scrapes and marks to boards including some ink blots to upper board. A very good copy. One of 'Two Hundred copies privately printed for Presents only'.   Ref: 51264 
£180
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Deyermond, Alan (ed.): A Century of British Medieval Studies. Oxford University Press for The British Academy, 2007. First edition. 8vo., pp. xxi, 801. Cloth, gilt-lettered, edges a little dusted.   Ref: 33431 
£25
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Gale, Roger (ed.:) Registrum Honoris de Richmond exhibens terrarum & villarum quae quondam fuerunt Edwini comitis infra Richmundshire descriptionem: ex libro Domesday in thesauria domini regis: [...]. Londini [London: ] Impensis R. Gosling, 1722. Large paper copy. Folio, pp. [ii], xxxv, [i], 106, [xxvi], 286, [xxx] + folding engraved map and 15 other engraved plates (7 folding). Lacking the list of subscribers leaf. Title and many pages in red and black. Spotted and lightly browned. Early 19th century marbled boards, scuffed, with spine renewed in half reversed calf by John Henderson c.1980. The Bowyer ledgers show 50 large paper copies were printed, of this last significant publication by Roger Gale (1672-1744), the eldest son of the antiquary Thomas Gale. The text is "a twelfth-century register of the honour of Richmond from the Cotton Library, accompanied by a long appendix of important early charters. It was published in 1722 under the auspices of the Society of Antiquaries, of which he was the first vice-president" (ODNB). ESTC T150024.   Ref: 53037 
£350
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Gasquet, Francis Aidan: The Last Abbot of Glastonbury and his Companions. An Historical Sketch. London: Simpkin Marshall, Hamilton, Kent & Co., 1895. 8vo., pp. [viii], 195, [i] + numerous plates including colour frontispiece. Very occasional faint spots of foxing, small patch of toning to half-title but generally clean within. Dark blue cloth, gilt title to spine and centrepiece to upper board. Slightly cocked, endcaps a little tattered, very slight wear to corners, edges uncut with some therefore becoming brittle but still very good.   Ref: 52228 
£20
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Gooder, Eileen A.: Latin for Local History: an Introduction. London: Longmans, 1967. 8vo., pp.x, 147, [i]. Occasional annotations in red and black ink. Orange cloth, gilt title to spine, very good overall. Third impression of the first edition, originally published 1961.   Ref: 51561 
£18
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(Goodwin, Thomas:) The History of the Reign of Henry the Fifth, King of England, &c. In Nine Books. London: printed by J.D. for S. and J. Sprint, J. Robinson, J. Taylor, Andr. Bell, T. Ballard, and B. 1704. Folio, pp. viii, 256, 267-272, 257-266, 273-362 + portrait frontispiece. Preface bound before dedication; pp. 267-272 (i.e. leaves MM2-4) bound out of order, but all present. The appendix has a separate titlepage, with the date 1703. A few neatly pencilled marginal notes. Frontis and title both lightly toned and a bit dusty, odd spots of foxing becoming heavy by final two leaves. Slightly later tan calf, neatly rebacked, raised bands, gilt spine, black title label, blind-tooled border, corners repaired, marbled edges, endpapers renewed. A little scuffed, some smudgy marks, a very good copy. Goodwin's work is beginning to be recognised by modern historians as an important and in some respects innovative early contribution to the historical reputation of Henry V. "Goodwin's study marked a milestone in the study of the reign of Henry V... The chief contrast between Goodwin's work and that of earlier writers on Henry V lies in the broader picture he drew of what kingship was about and, consequently, by what criteria a king might be judged... The history of a reign, as understood and presented by Goodwin, went far beyond the language and 'deeds' (Acta or Gesta) of a single man. It was the history of a national enterprise, guided and led by the king. Although historians may differ today over interpretations regarding this question or that, this success or that failure, and in particular over their understanding of the king's character, that is still, in essence, how we see his reign today." (Allmand). Please see 'Writing History in the Eighteenth Century: Thomas Goodwin's The History of the Reign of Henry the Fifth (1704)', Christopher Allmand's very interesting chapter in Henry V: New Interpretations (2013) for a great deal more information on the scope and innovations of Goodwin's work. ESTC T90148   Ref: 53036 
£500
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