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Anlezark, Daniel: Water and Fire: the Myth of the Flood in Anglo-Saxon England. Manchester University Press, 2006. 8vo., pp. x, 398. Purple cloth, gilt title to spine, fine. Dust-jacket very slightly shelf worn, near fine. In the Manchester Medieval Literature series (series editors J.J. Anderson and Gail Ashton).   Ref: 51556 
£20
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Anon. [Lowndes, William:] A Report Containing an Essay for the Amendment of the Silver Coins. London: printed by Charles Bill, and the Executrix of Thomas Newcomb, deceas'd; Printers to the King 1695. First edition. 8vo., pp. 159, [i]. Woodcut initials. Slight dampstain along bottom margin occasionally affecting (though not obscuring) text, title-page a little grubby but otherwise only occasional light spots and smudges. Modern tan half calf, red morocco gilt title label to spine, marbled boards, endpapers renewed. A very good copy in a sound modern binding. The Essay is divided into five distinct points: 'First, Concerning the Standard of the Gold and Silver Coins, and the Establishment of a Just and Reasonable Foot for the Course of the same'; 'Second, Concerning the Present State and Condition of the Gold and Silver Coins'; 'Third, Whether it be or be not Absolutely necessary at this Time to Re-establish the same'; 'Fourth, The Proposing of Means that must be Obtained, and the Proper Methods to be used in and for the Amendment of the Silver Moneys'; 'Fifth, To Consider what must Supply the Commerce, Pay Taxes &c. Whilst the Clipt Money is under its New Fabrication.' (pp.11-13) Lowndes (1652-1724) took office as secretary of the Treasury on 24th April 1695 in the midst of a worsening coinage crisis which the government was already making efforts to resolve. 'The practice of 'clipping' hammered silver coin had reached the point where it was seriously affecting the Treasury's ability to pay its way in the war with France, and in late 1694 confidence in the silver coinage weakened dramatically. A complete reminting of the coinage was now imperative, but the problem facing a House of Commons committee early in 1695 was whether there should be a temporary devaluation in order to stabilize the currency while the old money was reminted, a primary concern being to offset the inevitable loss in the value of tax receipts.' (ODNB) As Lowndes and the philosopher John Locke published opposing views on the subject (Lowndes in favour of devaluation and Locke against) the episode came to be referred to by historians as 'the Locke-Lowndes controversy'. However more recent studies have suggested that the views published here under Lowndes name on behalf of the Treasury were not actually his own. 'In a written report to the Treasury board in January 1695 Lowndes actually ruled out any suggestion of devaluation. While modestly conceding a limited grasp of the complexities behind the issue, he envisaged an immediate loss of some £150,000 in revenue, which would have to be met by a 'public tax', and a worrying increase in the cost of England's military payments abroad.' (Ibid). The Treasury board asked Lowndes to produce a detailed recoinage scheme but, 'since majority opinion on the board favoured devaluation it would appear that Lowndes was instructed to follow the scheme already proposed by the Commons. By mid-September his 'book', A Report Containing an Essay for the Amendment of the Silver Coins, was in Treasury hands. It embodied the Commons committee's resolutions and was fleshed out with much historical detail, but owing to the rapid increase in the market price of silver a devaluation rate of 20 per cent would now be necessary. William III and his ministers acknowledged Lowndes's ingenuity and scholarship but, disagreeing with the Treasury board, saw greater virtue in Locke's arguments for a recoinage at the old standard. Thus it was largely to assist the ministry's own scheme for recoinage in parliament that Lowndes's Report was subsequently published in November 1695, followed by Locke's Further Considerations Concerning Raising the Value of Money. While paying tribute to Lowndes's erudition, Locke was quick to point out that some of his arguments tended in fact to condemn devaluation of any kind. Moreover, the encouragement which Lowndes gave to Locke and other critics to publish their rebuttals of his Report would likewise suggest that Lowndes had never personally favoured devaluation. In January 1696 an act was passed for a recoinage at the existing standard.' (Ibid.) ESTC R39081; Wing (2nd ed.) L3323   Ref: 52379 
£350
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[Anon.] A Modest Enquiry into the Causes of the Present Disasters in England. And who they are that brought the French Fleet into the English Channel, Described. London: printed for Richard Baldwin in the Old-Baily. 1690. 4to., pp. [ii], 38. Bound without final blank leaf as usual (see ESTC). Title-page within double line border, short bookseller's catalogue to lower half of final page. Lightly toned and softened at fore-edge with some slight greyish spotting, title-page fore-edge a little ragged, light dampstain to bottom edge of last 4 leaves. Modern blue paper-covered boards, narrow vellum spine, orange spine label with 'Disasters' in gilt. A very good copy. Authorship of this work concerning a naval victory by France that was supposedly made possible by treachery is often attributed to Daniel Defoe, although Walter Wilson writes in his Memoirs of the Life and Times of Daniel Defoe (1830) that this is 'probably without any just reason'. He does however consider the work, 'well written, and a useful document of the times. The design of the author is to identify the disaffected clergy with the plot that was in activity against the government; in order to which, he gives a curious detail of their proceedings, and adduces a memorial which they presented to the French King, inviting him to the invasion of England.' (Ibid). Issuing this pamphlet earned its publisher Richard Baldwin a prison sentence. 'With the accession of William III, Baldwin, as a loyal supporter, was prepared to serve the government through the medium of his press. Yet the candor of his publications and his own impulsive behavior were to bring him into occasional conflict with the government he so heartily championed. In 1690 Baldwin was sentenced to Newgate for "misprision of treason" by Lord Daniel Finch, Second Earl of Nottingham, for having "publish'd a sticht book entitled a Modest Enquiry which reflects upon the dissenting bishops and other bold passages." Copies of the pamphlet were seized by "Robin Hog" Stevens, but the indefatigable Baldwin, again ready with bail, was released from sentence.' (Rostenberg, 'Richard and Anne Baldwin, Whig Patriot Publishers' in The Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America Vol. 47, No. 1 (First Quarter, 1953), pp. 1-42). Between 1689 and 1698 Baldwin published about 240 pamphlets, the majority being political and of those 75 being anti-French. 'The principal butt of these lampoons and libels was the aging monarch at Versailles whose limitless passion for war and territorial aggrandizement had left France bankrupt, her manhood destroyed and her people apathetic and indifferent to the future. The growing fear of a possible French invasion and the English contempt for Louis XIV are manifest in Baldwin's many libellous tracts' (ibid). ESTC R16429; Wing M2367   Ref: 52381 
£150
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Barber, Richard: Edward III and the Triumph of England. London: Allen Lane, 2013. First edition. 8vo., pp. xxii, 650. Black cloth, a hint of shelf-wear but still fine. Dust-jacket, a couple of tiny closed tears and moderate creasing to top edge, still very good.   Ref: 53009 
£15
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Bellamy, J.G.: The Law of Treason in England in the Later Middle Ages. Cambridge University Press, 1970. 8vo., pp. xviii, 266. Cloth, gilt-lettered, edges dusted. Illegible ownership inscription in pencil to ffep. Cambridge Studies in English Legal History.   Ref: 50837 
£30
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(Brewer, J.S.; Martin, Charles Trice, eds.:) Registrum Malmesburiense. The Register of Malmesbury Abbey; Preserved in the Public Record Office. London; Oxford; Cambridge; Edinburgh, Dublin: Longman & Co., Trubner & Co. et al, 1879. 2 vols. (not uniform), pp. 4, xvii, [iii], 517, [iii], 32, [ii]; 4, lxxxviii, [ii], 495, [i], 30, [ii]. Includes publisher's catalogue at rear of each volume. A little toned, some foxing, occasional marginal annotations. Vol. I in dark green cloth backed with brown sheep, gilt title to spine; spine very worn, upper board a little shaken, top edge dusty. Vol. II. in recent brown library cloth, gilt title to spine, endpapers renewed, cloth hinges. Vol. II trimmed and therefore a little smaller than vol. I. Good working copies. Burton-upon-Trent Public Library bookplates to front endpapers. To ffep, ownership inscription of the medievalist C.R. Cheney. Rerum Britannicarum Medii Aevi Scriptores, or Chronicles and Memorials of Great Britain and Ireland During the Middle Ages series.   Ref: 52170 
£20
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Burton, Janet E. (ed.): English Episcopal Acta V: York, 1070-1154. Oxford University Press for the British Academy, 1988. 8vo., pp. li, 152 + 4 plates. Red cloth, gilt, a little bumped at board top edges and corners, a few minor marks. Very good.   Ref: 42447 
£20
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Caviness, Madeline Harrison: The Windows of Christ Church Cathedral Canterbury. London: Oxford University Press for The British Academy, 1981. No. 865 in a Limited Edition of 1025. 4to. (318 x 252mm), pp. xl, 352 + plates. Hardback: black cloth, edges dusted, shelf wear. No dust-jacket. Still a very good copy. Corpus Vitrearum Medii Aevi, Great Britain - Volume II.   Ref: 53218 
£75
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Chambers, D.S: Faculty Office Registers 1534 -1549. A Calendar of the First Two Registers of the Archbishop of Canterbury's Faculty Office edited with an Introduction and Index. Oxford University Press, 1966. 8vo., pp. lxv, 394. Blue cloth with gilt lettering to spine, one corner bumped, otherwise fine. Top edge dust-speckled. Dust-jacket generally a litlle grubby with torn and worn edges so less than very good.   Ref: 40578 
£15
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Clemoes, Peter, et al. (eds.): Anglo-Saxon England 2. Cambridge University Press, 2007. Reprint of 1973 first edition. 8vo., pp. x, 333. Paperback. Other than shelf-wear and dusting to edges, as new.   Ref: 53124 
£10
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