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Anlezark, Daniel: Water and Fire: the Myth of the Flood in Anglo-Saxon England. Manchester University Press, 2006. 8vo., pp. x, 398. Purple cloth, gilt title to spine, fine. Dust-jacket very slightly shelf worn, near fine. In the Manchester Medieval Literature series (series editors J.J. Anderson and Gail Ashton).   Ref: 51556 
£20
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Anon. [Lowndes, William:] A Report Containing an Essay for the Amendment of the Silver Coins. London: printed by Charles Bill, and the Executrix of Thomas Newcomb, deceas'd; Printers to the King 1695. First edition. 8vo., pp. 159, [i]. Woodcut initials. Slight dampstain along bottom margin occasionally affecting (though not obscuring) text, title-page a little grubby but otherwise only occasional light spots and smudges. Modern tan half calf, red morocco gilt title label to spine, marbled boards, endpapers renewed. A very good copy in a sound modern binding. The Essay is divided into five distinct points: 'First, Concerning the Standard of the Gold and Silver Coins, and the Establishment of a Just and Reasonable Foot for the Course of the same'; 'Second, Concerning the Present State and Condition of the Gold and Silver Coins'; 'Third, Whether it be or be not Absolutely necessary at this Time to Re-establish the same'; 'Fourth, The Proposing of Means that must be Obtained, and the Proper Methods to be used in and for the Amendment of the Silver Moneys'; 'Fifth, To Consider what must Supply the Commerce, Pay Taxes &c. Whilst the Clipt Money is under its New Fabrication.' (pp.11-13) Lowndes (1652-1724) took office as secretary of the Treasury on 24th April 1695 in the midst of a worsening coinage crisis which the government was already making efforts to resolve. 'The practice of 'clipping' hammered silver coin had reached the point where it was seriously affecting the Treasury's ability to pay its way in the war with France, and in late 1694 confidence in the silver coinage weakened dramatically. A complete reminting of the coinage was now imperative, but the problem facing a House of Commons committee early in 1695 was whether there should be a temporary devaluation in order to stabilize the currency while the old money was reminted, a primary concern being to offset the inevitable loss in the value of tax receipts.' (ODNB) As Lowndes and the philosopher John Locke published opposing views on the subject (Lowndes in favour of devaluation and Locke against) the episode came to be referred to by historians as 'the Locke-Lowndes controversy'. However more recent studies have suggested that the views published here under Lowndes name on behalf of the Treasury were not actually his own. 'In a written report to the Treasury board in January 1695 Lowndes actually ruled out any suggestion of devaluation. While modestly conceding a limited grasp of the complexities behind the issue, he envisaged an immediate loss of some £150,000 in revenue, which would have to be met by a 'public tax', and a worrying increase in the cost of England's military payments abroad.' (Ibid). The Treasury board asked Lowndes to produce a detailed recoinage scheme but, 'since majority opinion on the board favoured devaluation it would appear that Lowndes was instructed to follow the scheme already proposed by the Commons. By mid-September his 'book', A Report Containing an Essay for the Amendment of the Silver Coins, was in Treasury hands. It embodied the Commons committee's resolutions and was fleshed out with much historical detail, but owing to the rapid increase in the market price of silver a devaluation rate of 20 per cent would now be necessary. William III and his ministers acknowledged Lowndes's ingenuity and scholarship but, disagreeing with the Treasury board, saw greater virtue in Locke's arguments for a recoinage at the old standard. Thus it was largely to assist the ministry's own scheme for recoinage in parliament that Lowndes's Report was subsequently published in November 1695, followed by Locke's Further Considerations Concerning Raising the Value of Money. While paying tribute to Lowndes's erudition, Locke was quick to point out that some of his arguments tended in fact to condemn devaluation of any kind. Moreover, the encouragement which Lowndes gave to Locke and other critics to publish their rebuttals of his Report would likewise suggest that Lowndes had never personally favoured devaluation. In January 1696 an act was passed for a recoinage at the existing standard.' (Ibid.) ESTC R39081; Wing (2nd ed.) L3323   Ref: 52379  show full image..
£350
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Baedeker, Karl: Great Britain. Handbook for travellers. Leipzig: Karl Baedeker, 1910. 8vo, pp. [lxviii], 624, with folding maps and plates. Slight toning, first folding map torn. Publisher's cloth, title gilt to upper board and spine, upper hinge starting, front endpapers a bit browned, extremities minimally worn.   Ref: 53501 
£20
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Barlow, Frank (ed.): The Life of King Edward who rests at Westminster attributed to a monk of St Bertin. London: Thomas Nelson and Sons, 1962. First edition. 8vo, pp. [lxxxii], 145. Slight toning, a very good copy. Red cloth, spine gilt, dust-jackets, edges minimally chipped, but still very good.   Ref: 53513 
£40
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Bell, H.E.: Maitland. A critical examination and assessment. London: Adam & Charles Black, 1965. First edition. 8vo, pp. 150. Slight toning, a very good copy. Red cloth, spine gilt, dust-jacket, a little browned, upper edge minimally worn, but still very good.   Ref: 53524 
£12
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Bellamy, J.G.: The Law of Treason in England in the Later Middle Ages. Cambridge University Press, 1970. 8vo., pp. xviii, 266. Cloth, gilt-lettered, edges dusted. Illegible ownership inscription in pencil to ffep. Cambridge Studies in English Legal History.   Ref: 50837 
£30
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Beresford, Guy: Caldecote: The Development and Desertion of a Hertfordshire Village. The Society for Medieval Archaeology, 2009. First edition. Folio (280 x 212 mm), pp. xi, 267. Illustrations to text. Paperback. Light shelf-wear, very good. The Society for Medieval Archaeology Monograph 28.   Ref: 53591 
£25
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Bishop, C.H.: Old Folkestone Pubs. Old inns, taverns and hotels of the ancient borough of Folkestone. West Mailing: Kent County Council, 1979. First edition. 4to, pp. 107, with photographic illustrations. Slight browning, the odd spot, a very good copy. Booklet, binder's tape to spine over pictorial wrappers, a little yellowed and spotted, but still good.   Ref: 53509 
£25
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Blomefield, Francis: [Parkin, Charles:] An Essay towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk, containing a Description of the Towns, Villages, and Hamlets, with the Foundations of Monasteries, Churches, Chapels, Chantries, and other Religious Buildings [...] London: Printed for William Miller [...] by W. Bulmer [...] 1805[-10]. Second edition. 11 vols, 8vo, pp. [5], [viii-xvi], 548 [iv] + illustrated frontispiece, 4 folding tables, 5 plates (2 folding); [4] 559 [5] + 3 folding tables and 1 folding plate; [viii] 671 [1]; [viii] 580 + 7 plates, 1 folding map and 2 folding tables; [4] 527 [5]; [4] [ii-vii] [1] 521 [3] + 5 plates and 1 folding table; [4] 520 [4] + 4 plates (2 folding) and 2 folding tables; [4] 548 [iv] + 7 plates (4 folding) and 3 folding table; [2] 527 [5] + 4 plate (2 folding) and 1 folding map; [4] 479 [5] + 3 folding tables; [6] 402 [2], 83 [1] [18] + 1 plate, with engraved headpieces and woodcut text illustrations. Edges uncut, a little dusty, slight yellowing, occasional light marginal foxing, I: half-title a little torn at gutter, II: small stain affecting two words to L4, III: lower outer blank corner of 3C4 and 3G2 torn, IV: plates slightly browned, couple of small tears along folds of 2 folding plates, 1 with small repair, V: 1 plate somewhat browned, VIII: small paper flaw to lower outer blank corner of N1, crude repair to upper outer corner of 2A2 just touching text, bifolium 2N2-3 loose at lower gutter, IX: last gathering loosening, X: small marginal tears, XI: bifolium b*2-3 loosening. Contemporary publisher's blue boards, later endpapers, publisher's paper label to spine, boards sympathetically cleaned, corners a little rubbed, I: joints partly split at head and foot but firm, II: upper hinge starting at head but firm, V: lower hinge starting at foot but firm, publisher's advertisements to front pastedown of vols I, VII: upper joint minimally split at foot, X: lower hinge loosening. Inscription to half-titles: 'Lucy Jane Davey Given by her Aunt Lydia Jan 7 1827'. Second edition of this illustrated topographical survey of Norfolk and its ancient families. The Rev. Francis Blomefield (1705-1752) initially issued the book in parts from a private press at his ecclesiastical living in Fersfield. The work was continued after his death by the Reverend Charles Parkin (1689-1765), and finished by a hack writer employed by the printer. A remarkably unsophisticated copy internally, rarely found in its original publisher's blue boards, with paper labels specifying 'Price Eighteenth Shillings, Boards' on each volume. It includes the plate 'A Map of Marsh land by Sir William Dugdale' (Vol. IX, p. 166) often lacking. Vols I and III feature on the front pastedown a publisher's advertisement, the first advertising the possibility to add the author's portrait to the copy (as here) for an extra 5 shillings, as well as the publication of vols II-IV, the second apologising for not including the plan of Norwich with the city seals, as promised (here present in vol. IV), due to 'the Engraver having disappointed him [the publisher]'. The last few pages of vol. XI include a list of subscribers and 'Directions to the binder' divided by volume, separating plates and pedigrees. Upcott 950 ff.   Ref: 53547  show full image..
£1375
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Borlase, William: Antiquities Historical and Monumental, of the County of Cornwall. [...] The second edition, revised, with several Additions... London: Printed by W. Bowyer and J. Nichols, 1769. Folio, pp. [xvi], 464 + 37 engraved plates (2 folding, most in small format, serving as head- or tailpieces). Slight toning, title and verso of last leaf a little dusty, traces of a horizontal fold (probably dating to when the book was in sheets), small repair to verso of pl. 7, upper edge a bit dusty, small tear to Y1-2 and Z1-2 affecting a couple of words, occasional slight spotting or light dampstaining. Modern quarter calf over marbled boards, gilt-lettered label. The second, enlarged edition of William Borlase's (1696-1772) account of the antiquities of Cornwall (first published 1754), with an index containing a Cornish-English vocabulary list. It was 'the first chronological account of the antiquities of the county, and the first book to describe, illustrate, and classify a significant number of them' (ODNB). Book II (over 100 pp.) is entirely devoted to the Druids, their origin, rites, doctrines, idols, symbols, worship, 'superstitions', divination, charms and incantations. Book III (c.140pp.) includes a discussion of rock idols, speaking and healing stones. 'Characteristic of [Borlase] as a scholar was his conscientious exactness in describing and measuring antiquities - he also had a talent for drawing them' (A.L. Rowse, review of Pool's 'William Borlase' in the Spectator, 26 Sept. 1987). ESTC T139784; Upcott II, 82.   Ref: 53546  show full image..
£575
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