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A Kempis, Thomas: L'Imitation de Jesus-Christ. Traduction nouvelle. Paris: Chez Saillant [...] Despilly [...] Desaint, 1767. 12mo. pp. [ii], xl, 409, [iii]. Half-title, engraved frontispiece, 5 engraved plates, armorial decoration on p. v. Small tear to lower edge of frontispiece, occasional very minor spotting on plates, lower edge of plate 3 shaved, 2 leaves misbound. 18th century crimson crushed morocco, marbled endpapers, triple gilt ruled, gilt fleurons to corners, raised bands, spine gilt ruled with gilt dentelles, fleurons, stars and tendrils, inner and outer edges gilt, a.e.g., silk bookmark. Covers minimally rubbed, sympathetic repair at head of spine. Bookplate of Robert J. Hayhurst to front pastedown. Exquisitely bound French translation of Thomas a Kempis devotional masterpiece. It was prepared by Louis-Isaac Lemaistre de Sacy (1613-84), priest, humanist and author of the Bible de Port Royal, the most used translation in 18th century France. Not in Brunet.   Ref: 53165  show full image..
£200
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[Aelian] Aelianus, Claudius: [...] Cl. Aeliani Sophistae Varia Historia, Cum Notis Integris Conradi Gesneri, Johannis Schefferi, Tanaquilli Fabri, Joachimi Kuhnii, Jacob Perizonii, & interpretatione Latina Justi Vulteii [...] Curante Abrahamo Gronovio [...] Lugd. Bat. [Leiden] Amstelodami {Amsterdam] Roterodami [Rotterdam] Ultrajecti [Utrecht] Hagae [The H 1731 2 vols. 4to. pp. [98], 1-640, [2], 641-1056, [160] + added prize book leaf. With half title, engraved title, printed title pages in red and black, and occasional small engraved text illustrations. Minor traces of adhesive at gutter of half-title, engraved title slightly adhering to title at gutter, slight toning, clean tear from edge to blank margin of second k4. 19th-century polished tree calf, marbled endpapers, single gilt ruled, gilt inscription 'Praemium gymnasii Franequerani MDCCCXLIX' to upper covers, spine gilt, gilt-lettered morocco label. Extremities of spine minimally rubbed. Prize book certificate of Franeker dated 1849 tipped-in at front of vol. I, addressed to Hector van Sminia and signed by the Rector. 'An admirable edition'. Included in the list of best quarto variorum editions provided by Dibdin in the 3rd edition of his 'Introduction to the Classics'. This prize book was awarded to the Frisian Hector van Sminia, whose namesake ancestor was ennobled in 1816. He was a student at the gymnasium of Franeker. That an 18th-century book was rebound and presented as a prize by the school suggest this may have once been in the library of the University of Franeker, closed down by Napoleon in 1811, and later in the Athenaeum established in its place until 1843. Dibdin I, 231; Schweiger I, 3; Hoffmann I, 13.   Ref: 53361  show full image..
£400
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Anacreon: Odaria, ad textus Barnesiani fidem emendata. Accedunt variae lectiones cura Eduardi Forster. Londini [London]: Sumptibus editoris excudebant Gul. Bulmer et Soc., 1802. 8vo., pp. [iv], 130. Frequent engraved head- and tail-pieces. Later green morocco, spine divided by raised bands, lettered in gilt direct, turn-ins gilt, all edges gilt. Title-page loosening, occasional minor spotting. Spine just slightly darkened, a touch of rubbing to head and corners. Armorial bookplate of Tervoe to front pastedown. An attractive printing of the Odes attributed to Anacreon, illustrated somewhat in the fashion of Pine's Horace (although the text is letterpress).   Ref: 53228  show full image..
£120
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Anacreon: (Brunck, Richard Francois Philippe, ed.:) Carmina. Accedunt Selecta Quaedam e Lyricorum Reliquiis. Argentorati [Strasbourg]: apud J.G. Treuttel, 1786. Third edition. 18mo., pp. [ii], 149, [i]. A little toned towards edges, some light patches of foxing. Green straight-grain morocco, raised bands and gilt title to spine, gilt borders, a.e.g.. Patchy colour fading, joints and corners worn, some scratches, still very good overall. Armorial bookplate of Thomas Sewell to front paste-down. "These are the most beautiful and accurate editions; the latter [i.e. this, of 1786] was twice published in the same year, and has the text of the Roman edition of Spalleti, but with corrections: it was a favourite edition" (Dibdin). Dibdin (4th edn.) I. 264.   Ref: 51271  show full image..
£95
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Anacreon: (Fawkes, Francis, trans.:) The Works of Anacreon, Sappho, Bion, Moschus and Musaeus. Translated from the Original Greek. London: printed for J. Walker, J. Wallis, and J. Binns, Leeds, 1789. 2nd edition. 12mo, pp. x, [ii, blank], 321, [3]. Some gatherings printed on blue paper. Contemporary sheep, spine divided by gilt rules, red morocco label. Somewhat browned and spotted throughout. Extremities a bit rubbed, corners just a touch worn, tidy repairs to joints and spine ends. Early ownership inscription of Alex. Brown to flyleaf. The posthumous, scarcer second edition of this highly-respected translation, first published 1760. Although Fawkes (bap. 1720-1777) had been widely read in his lifetime and formed a friendship with Samuel Johnson, he left little at his death for his widow to live upon, leading to publication of his unfinished works and and then this reprinting. ESTC T85627.   Ref: 53807  show full image..
£150
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Anacreon; Sappho: Hai tou Anakreontos odai. Kai ta tes Sapphous, kai ta tou Alkaiou leipsana. Glasguae [Glasgow]: Excudebant R. & A. Foulis, 1777. 8vo., pp. 100. Near-contemporary sprinkled calf (endpapers watermarked 1790), boards bordered with a gilt roll. Final gathering rather browned and with a dampmark in the gutter (this also just faintly visible at the beginning), first few leaves slightly dusty. Sometime (early 20th century?) rebacked in lighter brown leather, red morocco label, front hinge cracking a bit. Armorial bookplate of Walter Henry James to front pastedown, ownership inscription of H. Ellison, alumnus of Harrow School (dated July 1797) to initial blank. Gaskell lists two variants: a post 8vo and a foolscap 8vo with dagger signatures on the first leaf of most gatherings. This copy matches Gaskell's post 8vo in watermarks and collation, except that it has a dagger signature on A1 (but nowhere else). Gaskell 610; ESTC T84085.   Ref: 53227  show full image..
£150
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[Anacreon] Fawkes, Francis (trans.): The Works of Anacreon, Sappho, Bion, Moschus and Musaeus. Translated from the Original Greek. London: printed for J. Walker, J. Wallis, and J. Binns, Leeds, 1789. 2nd edition. 12mo., pp. x, 321, [iii]. English translations with notes, index to rear. A few light spots, paper taking on a blue tinge towards rear. Contemporary tan speckled calf, gilt-ruled spine with red label, gilt board edges. A little glue visible to head-cap, tail-cap worn, corner tips fraying very slightly but still very good. Francis Fawkes' (bap. 1720, d. 1777) translation of Anacreon first appeared anonymously in 1760. Fawkes was a prolific and skilled poet and translator, and a somewhat less committed clergyman: 'Overall, Fawkes's clerical career was undistinguished; in an age that tolerated much laxity in its parsons, he seems to have pursued enjoyment to the detriment of ambition. It is in some ways a fitting career for so effortless a classicist: Epicurus, with his injunction to live in happy obscurity, would not have disapproved.' (ODNB). ESTC T85627   Ref: 52264  show full image..
£95
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Anon. [Lowndes, William:] A Report Containing an Essay for the Amendment of the Silver Coins. London: printed by Charles Bill, and the Executrix of Thomas Newcomb, deceas'd; Printers to the King 1695. First edition. 8vo., pp. 159, [i]. Woodcut initials. Slight dampstain along bottom margin occasionally affecting (though not obscuring) text, title-page a little grubby but otherwise only occasional light spots and smudges. Modern tan half calf, red morocco gilt title label to spine, marbled boards, endpapers renewed. A very good copy in a sound modern binding. The Essay is divided into five distinct points: 'First, Concerning the Standard of the Gold and Silver Coins, and the Establishment of a Just and Reasonable Foot for the Course of the same'; 'Second, Concerning the Present State and Condition of the Gold and Silver Coins'; 'Third, Whether it be or be not Absolutely necessary at this Time to Re-establish the same'; 'Fourth, The Proposing of Means that must be Obtained, and the Proper Methods to be used in and for the Amendment of the Silver Moneys'; 'Fifth, To Consider what must Supply the Commerce, Pay Taxes &c. Whilst the Clipt Money is under its New Fabrication.' (pp.11-13) Lowndes (1652-1724) took office as secretary of the Treasury on 24th April 1695 in the midst of a worsening coinage crisis which the government was already making efforts to resolve. 'The practice of 'clipping' hammered silver coin had reached the point where it was seriously affecting the Treasury's ability to pay its way in the war with France, and in late 1694 confidence in the silver coinage weakened dramatically. A complete reminting of the coinage was now imperative, but the problem facing a House of Commons committee early in 1695 was whether there should be a temporary devaluation in order to stabilize the currency while the old money was reminted, a primary concern being to offset the inevitable loss in the value of tax receipts.' (ODNB) As Lowndes and the philosopher John Locke published opposing views on the subject (Lowndes in favour of devaluation and Locke against) the episode came to be referred to by historians as 'the Locke-Lowndes controversy'. However more recent studies have suggested that the views published here under Lowndes name on behalf of the Treasury were not actually his own. 'In a written report to the Treasury board in January 1695 Lowndes actually ruled out any suggestion of devaluation. While modestly conceding a limited grasp of the complexities behind the issue, he envisaged an immediate loss of some £150,000 in revenue, which would have to be met by a 'public tax', and a worrying increase in the cost of England's military payments abroad.' (Ibid). The Treasury board asked Lowndes to produce a detailed recoinage scheme but, 'since majority opinion on the board favoured devaluation it would appear that Lowndes was instructed to follow the scheme already proposed by the Commons. By mid-September his 'book', A Report Containing an Essay for the Amendment of the Silver Coins, was in Treasury hands. It embodied the Commons committee's resolutions and was fleshed out with much historical detail, but owing to the rapid increase in the market price of silver a devaluation rate of 20 per cent would now be necessary. William III and his ministers acknowledged Lowndes's ingenuity and scholarship but, disagreeing with the Treasury board, saw greater virtue in Locke's arguments for a recoinage at the old standard. Thus it was largely to assist the ministry's own scheme for recoinage in parliament that Lowndes's Report was subsequently published in November 1695, followed by Locke's Further Considerations Concerning Raising the Value of Money. While paying tribute to Lowndes's erudition, Locke was quick to point out that some of his arguments tended in fact to condemn devaluation of any kind. Moreover, the encouragement which Lowndes gave to Locke and other critics to publish their rebuttals of his Report would likewise suggest that Lowndes had never personally favoured devaluation. In January 1696 an act was passed for a recoinage at the existing standard.' (Ibid.) ESTC R39081; Wing (2nd ed.) L3323   Ref: 52379  show full image..
£350
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Antoninus Liberalis; Xylander, Wilhelm (ed.): [Metamorphoseon Synagoge] Transformationum Congeries [...] Lugduni Batavorum [Leiden]: apud Sam. et Joan. Luchtmans, 1774. Large 8vo, pp. [32], 304, [20] + added frontispiece with small engraved arms of Amsterdam with name of student. With engraved title vignette, woodcut initials and ornaments. Occasional slight browning, intermittent very light foxing. Contemporary Dutch vellum, single gilt ruled, gilt centrepieces with arms of Amsterdam to boards, small gilt arms of Amsterdam to corners, gilt arms of Amsterdam to spine, four original silk ties. Prize book certificate addressed to the schoolboy Isaac Orobio de Castro and signed by the master H. Verheyk in 1774. Sumptuously bound copy - a prize book signed and presented by the master of the school, and editor of this work, Heinrich Verheyk. 'A most excellent edition.' (Dibdin) The 'Metamorphoseon' - mythological prose stories of transformations caused by avenging Greek deities - is the only extant work by the grammarian Antoninus Liberalis (c. 2nd century). This edition includes the notes of Wilhelm Xylander, first published in 1568, as well as others by Heinrich Verheyk, head of the Latin school in Amsterdam. The schoolboy Isaac Orobio de Castro to whom this book was bestowed was probably a descendant of the namesake Portuguese Jewish philosopher, who died in 1687 in Amsterdam, where he had moved and made a public profession of Judaism. Dibdin I, 268; Ebert 752.   Ref: 53360  show full image..
£325
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Appian: (Davies, John, trans.:) The History of Appian of Alexandria, in two parts. The first consisting of the Punick, Syrian, Parthian, Mithridatick, Illyrian, Spanish, and Hannibalick Wars. The Second containing five books of the Civil Wars of Rome... The third edition. London: Printed for John Amery at the Peacock, [...], 1679 Folio, 2 parts in 1, pp. [xiv], 251, [i], 273, [ii]. Title in red and black, woodcut initials and ornaments. First and last four leaves a bit browned and dampstained at margins, title frayed at fore-edge, light age browning throughout, occasional slight marginal foxing, 2B2-3 soiled, long clean tear from fore-edge of 4h2 extending along blank margin. Contemporary full calf, single blind ruled, rebacked with original spine onlaid, scattered loss to covers from binding acid. Modern bookplate of Fox Pointe Collection to front pastedown. The first edition of the second English translation of Appian of Alexandria's important 'Historia Romana'. Written in the 2nd century AD, it spans the origins of Rome to the end of the Republic, with a detailed account of the Civil Wars, which here constitutes the second part. This translation, originally attributed to John Dryden, was produced by John Davies (1627-93) of Kidwelly. After studying at Oxford and Cambridge, and spending some time in France, he was employed by London booksellers as a translator from Latin and French. This copy was in the Fox Pointe Manor Library, a rich collection of 17th-century English imprints gathered by Dr Howard Knohl. ESTC R13368; Hoffmann I, 280.   Ref: 53761  show full image..
£1000
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