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Ammianus Marcellinus: (Gronovius, Jacobus, ed.:) Rerum gestarum qui de XXXI supersunt, libri XVIII. Ope MSS. codicum emendati ab Frederico Lindenbrogio & Henrico Hadrianoque Valesiis cum eorundem integris observationibus & annotationibus, item excerpta vetera de gestis Constantini & regum Italiae. Omnia nunc recognita ab Jacobo Gronovio, qui suas q Lugduni Batavorum [Leiden]: apud Petrum. Van der Aa, 1693. Folio in 4s, pp. [xlviii], 514, [xiv] + 18 plates (of which 3 are folding) including portrait frontispiece, plus 2 engraved illustrations: a large depiction of Nicaea to unpaginated leaf 2*4 verso, and a small numismatic head-piece to p.1. Bound without the binder's instructions sometimes found at rear. Title-page in red and black with engraved vignette, woodcut initials and some head- and tail-pieces. Occasional very light foxing, a few tiny scorch-holes, repaired closed tear to folding plate opposite p.125 with no loss. Contemporary Cambridge-style panelled calf with late 19th-century reback in pebble grained leather, raised bands and gilt title to spine, endpapers replaced. Joints a bit rubbed and just starting to weaken, edges worn, corners beginning to fray, a few small scuffs and scrapes, slightly toned endpapers split at hinges but boards still entirely firm. A very good copy. Two MS inscriptions to preliminary blank: Richard Pooler of Holmesdale (lightly crossed through); R. Travers Herford, 'Stand (Oxford), June 1905'. Pooler's inscription repeated on title-page, together with a short code: 'P.T.Pi. H-S-E.' The second inscription is likely that of Richard Travers Herford (18601950), the Unitarian minister and scholar of rabbinical literature. In 1886 his first published studies in Talmudics appeared in an article in The Christian Reformer entitled 'The Jerusalem Talmud'. Herford was noted as one of the first Christian scholars of the Pharisees to take a neutral view between Talmud and New Testament, and continued to work towards breaking down the prejudices of the laity. He was in London from 1914 to 1925 living and working at Dr. Williams' Library at 14 Gordon Square, where a blue plaque in his honour can still be found. The work of the 4th-century AD Roman historian Ammianus Marcellinus survives very imperfectly, with the first 18 books lost completely and only one extant significant (though corrupt) manuscript source for the remainder. Early editors Accursius and Gelen had access to an alternate manuscript tradition, now lost, which provided the text of the final books. Ammianus had detached and secular views on the rise of Christianity, and was later a favoured author of Gibbon for his 'Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire'. Here he effectively provides a continuation of the History of Tactius, covering the period 353-378. Jacobus Gronovius' (1645-1716) 1693 (first) edition is noted both for its erudition and for being particularly well illustrated. A rich culture of historical and literary cross-referencing to other classical texts is revealed in the deep footnotes, which Gronovius partially inherited from Henri de Valois, and his early seventeenth century predecessor, Friedrich Lindenbrog. He also adds Chifflet's life of Ammianus. Gronovius was a professor of Greek at Pisa and Leyden; he engaged in a series of bitter public disputes with Richard Bentley of Cambridge. An esteemed variorum edition, 'admirable' and 'highly spoken of by Ernesti and Harwood, and well known in the republic of literature [...] The vignettes are very neat.' (Dibdin). Moss quotes Harwood's opinion that Gronovius' edition is, 'very deservedly esteemed among the best edited books in Holland. The text is published with great accuracy; the notes of Gronovius are very valuable; and it is adorned with elegant figures.' The figures include: a portrait of Gronovius by van Zylvelt (frontispiece); 6 plates of Roman coins; 7 medallion portraits of Roman emperors plus a portrait of Procopius; a large folding plate with views of the Obeliscus Ramessaeus; 2 further folding plates, 1 depicting the Battle of Strasbourg and 1 the Siege of Amida, both by Romeyn de Hooghe. A 4to. version with different pagination appeared alongside this folio edition. An entry on COPAC calls for 19 plates, but we wonder whether this includes the large illustration of Nicaea on unpaginated leaf 2*4 verso, as our count of 18 matches the copy at Trinity College, Cambridge found on COPAC, as well as the digitised the copy from Lyon Public Library and other copies listed for sale. Dibdin I, 257; Moss I, 39; Schweiger II, 3   Ref: 52290 
£600
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Anacreon: (Brunck, Richard Francois Philippe, ed.:) Carmina. Accedunt Selecta Quaedam e Lyricorum Reliquiis. Argentorati [Strasbourg]: apud J.G. Treuttel, 1786. Third edition. 18mo., pp. [ii], 149, [i]. A little toned towards edges, some light patches of foxing. Green straight-grain morocco, raised bands and gilt title to spine, gilt borders, a.e.g.. Patchy colour fading, joints and corners worn, some scratches, still very good overall. Armorial bookplate of Thomas Sewell to front paste-down. "These are the most beautiful and accurate editions; the latter [i.e. this, of 1786] was twice published in the same year, and has the text of the Roman edition of Spalleti, but with corrections: it was a favourite edition" (Dibdin). Dibdin (4th edn.) I. 264.   Ref: 51271 
£95
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[Anacreon] Fawkes, Francis (ed. & trans.): The Works of Anacreon, Sappho, Bion, Moschus and Musaeus. Translated from the Original Greek. London: printed for J. Walker, J. Wallis, and J. Binns, Leeds, 1789. 2nd edition. 12mo., pp. x, 321, [iii]. English translations with notes, index to rear. A few light spots, paper taking on a blue tinge towards rear. Contemporary tan speckled calf, gilt-ruled spine with red label, gilt board edges. A little glue visible to head-cap, tail-cap worn, corner tips fraying very slightly but still very good. Francis Fawkes' (bap. 1720, d. 1777) translation of Anacreon first appeared anonymously in 1760. Fawkes was a prolific and skilled poet and translator, and a somewhat less committed clergyman: 'Overall, Fawkes's clerical career was undistinguished; in an age that tolerated much laxity in its parsons, he seems to have pursued enjoyment to the detriment of ambition. It is in some ways a fitting career for so effortless a classicist: Epicurus, with his injunction to live in happy obscurity, would not have disapproved.' (ODNB). ESTC T85627   Ref: 52264 
£95
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Anon. [Lowndes, William:] A Report Containing an Essay for the Amendment of the Silver Coins. London: printed by Charles Bill, and the Executrix of Thomas Newcomb, deceas'd; Printers to the King 1695. First edition. 8vo., pp. 159, [i]. Woodcut initials. Slight dampstain along bottom margin occasionally affecting (though not obscuring) text, title-page a little grubby but otherwise only occasional light spots and smudges. Modern tan half calf, red morocco gilt title label to spine, marbled boards, endpapers renewed. A very good copy in a sound modern binding. The Essay is divided into five distinct points: 'First, Concerning the Standard of the Gold and Silver Coins, and the Establishment of a Just and Reasonable Foot for the Course of the same'; 'Second, Concerning the Present State and Condition of the Gold and Silver Coins'; 'Third, Whether it be or be not Absolutely necessary at this Time to Re-establish the same'; 'Fourth, The Proposing of Means that must be Obtained, and the Proper Methods to be used in and for the Amendment of the Silver Moneys'; 'Fifth, To Consider what must Supply the Commerce, Pay Taxes &c. Whilst the Clipt Money is under its New Fabrication.' (pp.11-13) Lowndes (1652-1724) took office as secretary of the Treasury on 24th April 1695 in the midst of a worsening coinage crisis which the government was already making efforts to resolve. 'The practice of 'clipping' hammered silver coin had reached the point where it was seriously affecting the Treasury's ability to pay its way in the war with France, and in late 1694 confidence in the silver coinage weakened dramatically. A complete reminting of the coinage was now imperative, but the problem facing a House of Commons committee early in 1695 was whether there should be a temporary devaluation in order to stabilize the currency while the old money was reminted, a primary concern being to offset the inevitable loss in the value of tax receipts.' (ODNB) As Lowndes and the philosopher John Locke published opposing views on the subject (Lowndes in favour of devaluation and Locke against) the episode came to be referred to by historians as 'the Locke-Lowndes controversy'. However more recent studies have suggested that the views published here under Lowndes name on behalf of the Treasury were not actually his own. 'In a written report to the Treasury board in January 1695 Lowndes actually ruled out any suggestion of devaluation. While modestly conceding a limited grasp of the complexities behind the issue, he envisaged an immediate loss of some £150,000 in revenue, which would have to be met by a 'public tax', and a worrying increase in the cost of England's military payments abroad.' (Ibid). The Treasury board asked Lowndes to produce a detailed recoinage scheme but, 'since majority opinion on the board favoured devaluation it would appear that Lowndes was instructed to follow the scheme already proposed by the Commons. By mid-September his 'book', A Report Containing an Essay for the Amendment of the Silver Coins, was in Treasury hands. It embodied the Commons committee's resolutions and was fleshed out with much historical detail, but owing to the rapid increase in the market price of silver a devaluation rate of 20 per cent would now be necessary. William III and his ministers acknowledged Lowndes's ingenuity and scholarship but, disagreeing with the Treasury board, saw greater virtue in Locke's arguments for a recoinage at the old standard. Thus it was largely to assist the ministry's own scheme for recoinage in parliament that Lowndes's Report was subsequently published in November 1695, followed by Locke's Further Considerations Concerning Raising the Value of Money. While paying tribute to Lowndes's erudition, Locke was quick to point out that some of his arguments tended in fact to condemn devaluation of any kind. Moreover, the encouragement which Lowndes gave to Locke and other critics to publish their rebuttals of his Report would likewise suggest that Lowndes had never personally favoured devaluation. In January 1696 an act was passed for a recoinage at the existing standard.' (Ibid.) ESTC R39081; Wing (2nd ed.) L3323   Ref: 52379 
£350
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[Anon.] A Modest Enquiry into the Causes of the Present Disasters in England. And who they are that brought the French Fleet into the English Channel, Described. London: printed for Richard Baldwin in the Old-Baily. 1690. 4to., pp. [ii], 38. Bound without final blank leaf as usual (see ESTC). Title-page within double line border, short bookseller's catalogue to lower half of final page. Lightly toned and softened at fore-edge with some slight greyish spotting, title-page fore-edge a little ragged, light dampstain to bottom edge of last 4 leaves. Modern blue paper-covered boards, narrow vellum spine, orange spine label with 'Disasters' in gilt. A very good copy. Authorship of this work concerning a naval victory by France that was supposedly made possible by treachery is often attributed to Daniel Defoe, although Walter Wilson writes in his Memoirs of the Life and Times of Daniel Defoe (1830) that this is 'probably without any just reason'. He does however consider the work, 'well written, and a useful document of the times. The design of the author is to identify the disaffected clergy with the plot that was in activity against the government; in order to which, he gives a curious detail of their proceedings, and adduces a memorial which they presented to the French King, inviting him to the invasion of England.' (Ibid). Issuing this pamphlet earned its publisher Richard Baldwin a prison sentence. 'With the accession of William III, Baldwin, as a loyal supporter, was prepared to serve the government through the medium of his press. Yet the candor of his publications and his own impulsive behavior were to bring him into occasional conflict with the government he so heartily championed. In 1690 Baldwin was sentenced to Newgate for "misprision of treason" by Lord Daniel Finch, Second Earl of Nottingham, for having "publish'd a sticht book entitled a Modest Enquiry which reflects upon the dissenting bishops and other bold passages." Copies of the pamphlet were seized by "Robin Hog" Stevens, but the indefatigable Baldwin, again ready with bail, was released from sentence.' (Rostenberg, 'Richard and Anne Baldwin, Whig Patriot Publishers' in The Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America Vol. 47, No. 1 (First Quarter, 1953), pp. 1-42). Between 1689 and 1698 Baldwin published about 240 pamphlets, the majority being political and of those 75 being anti-French. 'The principal butt of these lampoons and libels was the aging monarch at Versailles whose limitless passion for war and territorial aggrandizement had left France bankrupt, her manhood destroyed and her people apathetic and indifferent to the future. The growing fear of a possible French invasion and the English contempt for Louis XIV are manifest in Baldwin's many libellous tracts' (ibid). ESTC R16429; Wing M2367   Ref: 52381 
£150
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Aurelius Victor, Sextus: (Arntzenius, J., ed.:) Historia Romana, cum notis integris [...] Amstelodami [Amsterdam]: apud Janssonio Waesbergios. Trajecti Batav. [Utrecht]: apud Jacobum a Pools 1733. 4to., pp. [xlviii], 668, [cxxxiv] (including one full-page engraving) + additional engraved title-page. Title page in red and black with engraved vignette, illustrations (mostly numismatic) and a few decorations. Sudden heavy foxing from p.201 diminishing towards approx. p.257, occasional small scorch marks never affecting more than a letter or two. Contemporary brown marbled calf, raised bands, orange gilt label to spine, edges coloured yellow. Spine and corners rubbed, tiny tear to headcap, joints wearing a little but a very good copy. Arms of the Dutch city of Leeuwarden, capital of Friesland, in gilt to centre of each board. Illegible pencilled signature to ffep. The text is a new recension by Arntzenius, based on the work of Schott. Dibdin includes this edition on his list of best quarto variora, and notes: 'It is certainly an elaborate performance [...] the edition is indispensable to the collector's library.' Dibdin (4th edn.) I 343; Schweiger II 1136; Graesse VII, 299   Ref: 51544 
£275
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Ausonius, Decimus Magnus; Martialis, Marcus Valerius; Catullus, Tibullus & Propertius: Opera, Ex Recognitione Josephi Scaligeri Jul. Caes. F.; Epigrammaton libri XII. Xeniorum liber I. Apopharetorum liber I.; [Works]. [Leiden:] ex officina Plantiniana Raphelengii, 1605; 1606; 1601. 3 works in 1 volume. 24mo., pp. 238, [i]; 272; 213, [iii], includes final blanks to first and last works. Woodcut printer's device to each title-page. Very slightly toned, lower fore-edge corners of leaf N2 of Ausonius and leaf G2 of Catullus torn away though not affecting text apart from the latter's catchword. Contemporary semi-limp vellum, recent red leather and gilt title label to spine, edges coloured red. Both paste-downs lifted, exposing some scraps of vellum MS used as sewing supports. A little cocked, spine slightly creased, a few smudgy marks but very good. A few pencilled bookseller's notes to front endpapers. Small inscription of an illegible name in an old hand to front paste-down recto. 20th-century bookplate ('Georgii Fletcher et Amicorum') to front paste-down verso. Three pocket-sized editions of classical works from the Plantin press, all scarce in the UK with COPAC finding no copies of the Ausonius, one BL copy of the 1606 Martial and only 1587, 1603 and 1613 editions of the Catullus rather than the 1601 found here (WorldCat finds one copy of the 1601 Catullus in Leiden University Library). Schweiger (II, 80) mentions the 1603 edition of Catullus, but no others. Francois Raphelengien joined the Plantin press as a corrector in 1564 and remained there for 25 years until the death of Christopher Plantin, from whom inherited the Leiden branch of the press. Francois died in 1597, followed by his son and heir Christopher only three years later. These works date from the time of his second son Francois II, who was not appointed as printer to the University as his predecessors had been, and who sold the business in 1619.   Ref: 52191 
£650
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Boswell, James: An Account of Corsica, the Journal of a Tour to that Island; and Memoirs of Pascal Paoli. Illustrated with a new and accurate map of Corsica. Glasgow: printed by Robert and Andrew Foulis for Edward and Charles Dilly, London, 1768. First edition. 8vo., pp. xxi, [iii], 382 + folding map (2nd state). Engraved vignette to title. Occasional very light offsetting, a few spots and smudges with p.1 a little foxed, map with repaired tear near gutter but no loss. Contemporary brown calf boards rebacked neatly but in a much lighter mustard shade, raised bands gilt ruled, burgundy and green morocco labels, plain double filet gilt borders, armorial gilt centrepiece of Londonderry Public Library to upper board. Rubbed, corners bumped particularly the top fore-edge corner of the upper board, endpapers a little toned at edges. A good, sound copy. Old MS library code to ffep verso. A number of variants exist, but in this copy: D2 is in its first state with 'John Home' after the first quotation; E2 and Z3 are cancels (with the correct spelling of Mariani on p.357 and 'Is-' at the end of line 11 on p.67); the last words of line 6, p.93 are "prince of" rather than the misspelling "prince fo"; line 18, p.296 are ends "of my own" rather than "my own of". First edition copy of Boswell's first substantial work, which was published in February of 1768. 'His meetings with Rousseau inspired Boswell to make a bold journey to Corsica [in 1764-5] to meet General Pasquale Paoli, leader of the insurgents seeking the island's independence from the Genoese [...] After a difficult inland journey he met and had conversations (22 to 27 October) in Sollacarò with Paoli, who at first suspected he was a spy, but who quickly came to like his improbable young visitor, saw an opportunity for promotion of the Corsican cause in Britain, and consented to a series of interviews. Boswell's trip was both arduous and dangerous. He suffered painfully from ingrowing toenails, the result of trudging long distances in inadequate boots, and he contracted malaria, but the experience none the less exhilarated him. He remarked in 1783: 'I had got upon a rock in Corsica and jumped into the middle of life' (Boswelliana, 328). [...] With its reports of the gallant islanders and a Plutarchan depiction of Paoli paralleled with several classical heroes, [An Account of Corsica] was an immediate success. The work was widely read and translated, stimulated great interest in Paoli and the Corsican cause, brought its author wide fame in Britain and Europe, and found an interested readership among the Americans. It attracted the notice of the French government (which had a translation made), and though Boswell's ambition for British intervention was not to be fulfilled, he probably influenced Britain's decision to send secret supplies of arms to the Corsicans.' (ODNB) ESTC T26157; Gaskell 473   Ref: 52306 
£600
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Boxhorn, Marc Zuerius: (Hartnack, Daniel, ed.:) Chronologia praecipuorum universi orbis imperiorum, regnorum, principatuum, rerumque, publicarum ortus, mutationes, atque occasus designans. Edita atque plurimis additionibus & continuatione usque in praesentem annum aucta a Daniele Hartnaccio [...] Budissae [Budissina]: impensis Friderici Arnstii, typis Johannis Rudolphi Leonis, 1688. Folio, pp. [iv], 251, [i] + 4 folding tables at rear. Title-page in red and black, a few woodcut ornaments. Lightly toned with occasional light foxing, title-page more heavily affected. Some paper repairs to the back of each plate, mostly to edges and attachments, plus a little foxing. Contemporary vellum, edges sprinkled blue. Vellum a bit grubby with a few spots and smudges, a little light foxing to endpapers and their hinges reinforced. A very good copy. To ffep, inscription of Ant. Johnson; to title-page, ex libris inscription possibly in the name of Grosvenor, dated April 26th 1805. Boxhorn (1612-1653), a politician and linguist, was in 1648 successor to Daniel Heinsius as Professor of History at the university of Leiden. Chronologia consists mainly of three-column tables showing important events in both world and church history set next to the reigning monarch of the time.   Ref: 52222 
£225
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Burton, William: A Commentary on Antoninus his Itinerary, or Journies of the Romane Empire, so far as it Concerneth Britain [...] London: printed by Tho. Roycroft (for) Henry Twyford, and T. Twyford, 1658. Small folio (285 x 190mm), pp. [xx], 266, [vi] + 2 plates: portrait frontispiece (by Hollar) and double-page map. Lacking single-leaf 'Preface to the Reader' (but see below). Title-page in red and black, woodcut initials, illustrations in the text, errata to final leaf verso. Small burn-hole to pp.33-4 just touching a few letters, pp. 141-2 creased during binding, very occasional spotting and a few slight smudges, front and rear blanks darkened at edges. Contemporary calf, gilt-ruled panels with various mottled effects, all edges gilt, rebacked with dark brown morocco, original spine label retained. Spine rubbed, a few chips, inner hinges relined with tape, marbled front pastedown but no marbled flyleaf. Armorial bookplate of Robert N. Pemberton and bookplate of T.H. Ellison to front pastedown. Underneath the Pemberton plate a piece of paper crossed through in ink, possibly patching a removed third bookplate. Latin annotation in an old hand to preliminary blank. ESTC calls for 22 pages of preliminaries but a number of copies, including those in St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle and others in libraries and sale records, have only 20 pages, being without the single-leaf 'Preface to the Reader'. This leaf, a singleton signed 'a', may have been more frequently omitted because the 'Catalogue of Authors' which would follow it is also signed 'a'. William Burton (1609-1657) is sometimes confused with another of the same name, the younger brother of Robert Burton and author of 'The Description of Leicestershire', but this Burton was more adept at philology. He died of palsy shortly before the completion of this work. ESTC R6432; Wing B6185   Ref: 49120 
£600
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