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Boswell, James: An Account of Corsica, the Journal of a Tour to that Island; and Memoirs of Pascal Paoli. Illustrated with a new and accurate map of Corsica. Glasgow: printed by Robert and Andrew Foulis for Edward and Charles Dilly, London, 1768. First edition. 8vo., pp. xxi, [iii], 382 + folding map (2nd state). Engraved vignette to title. Occasional very light offsetting, a few spots and smudges with p.1 a little foxed, map with repaired tear near gutter but no loss. Contemporary brown calf boards rebacked neatly but in a much lighter mustard shade, raised bands gilt ruled, burgundy and green morocco labels, plain double filet gilt borders, armorial gilt centrepiece of Londonderry Public Library to upper board. Rubbed, corners bumped particularly the top fore-edge corner of the upper board, endpapers a little toned at edges. A good, sound copy. Old MS library code to ffep verso. A number of variants exist, but in this copy: D2 is in its first state with 'John Home' after the first quotation; E2 and Z3 are cancels (with the correct spelling of Mariani on p.357 and 'Is-' at the end of line 11 on p.67); the last words of line 6, p.93 are "prince of" rather than the misspelling "prince fo"; line 18, p.296 are ends "of my own" rather than "my own of". First edition copy of Boswell's first substantial work, which was published in February of 1768. 'His meetings with Rousseau inspired Boswell to make a bold journey to Corsica [in 1764-5] to meet General Pasquale Paoli, leader of the insurgents seeking the island's independence from the Genoese [...] After a difficult inland journey he met and had conversations (22 to 27 October) in Sollacarò with Paoli, who at first suspected he was a spy, but who quickly came to like his improbable young visitor, saw an opportunity for promotion of the Corsican cause in Britain, and consented to a series of interviews. Boswell's trip was both arduous and dangerous. He suffered painfully from ingrowing toenails, the result of trudging long distances in inadequate boots, and he contracted malaria, but the experience none the less exhilarated him. He remarked in 1783: 'I had got upon a rock in Corsica and jumped into the middle of life' (Boswelliana, 328). [...] With its reports of the gallant islanders and a Plutarchan depiction of Paoli paralleled with several classical heroes, [An Account of Corsica] was an immediate success. The work was widely read and translated, stimulated great interest in Paoli and the Corsican cause, brought its author wide fame in Britain and Europe, and found an interested readership among the Americans. It attracted the notice of the French government (which had a translation made), and though Boswell's ambition for British intervention was not to be fulfilled, he probably influenced Britain's decision to send secret supplies of arms to the Corsicans.' (ODNB) ESTC T26157; Gaskell 473   Ref: 52306 
£600
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Chillingworth, William: The Religion of Protestants 1638. A Safe Way to Salvation. Menston: Scolar Press, 1972. Facsimile (Original Size). Folio. Small smudgy mark to title-page, otherwise very clean within. Blue cloth, gilt title to spine, small gilt centrepiece to upper board. Fading to spine and to boards towards edges, no dust-jacket, very good overall.   Ref: 37560 
£24
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Delumeau, Jean: (Nicholson, Eric, trans.:) Sin and Fear: the Emergence of a Western Guilt Culture, 13th-18th Centuries. New York: St, Martin's Press, 1990. 8vo., pp.x, 677, [i]. Green cloth, gilt title to spine. Top edge a little dusty but almost fine.   Ref: 51605 
£35
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Dmitrieva, Olga; Abramova, Natalya (eds): Britannia and Muscovy. English Silver at the Court of the Tsars. Yale University Press, 2006 4to., 254 x 238 mm., pp. 303. Lavishly illustrated. Black cloth, silver title to spine. Dust-jacket with very light shelf wear, near fine.   Ref: 52345 
£12
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Grafton, Anthony: Defenders of the Text: the Traditions of Scholarship in an Age of Science Cambridge, Mass. & London: Harvard University Press, 1991. First edition. 8vo., pp. 330. Cloth, gilt-lettered to spine, fine. Dust-jacket, slightly faded to spine, very slight edge-wear, very good.   Ref: 53105 
£30
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Grundon, Imogen: The Rash Adventurer. A Life of John Pendlebury. London: Libri, 2007. First edition. 8vo., pp. xv, 383 + 16 of photographs. Black cloth, green-lettered, fine. Dust-jacket, creased at top edge with two small closed tears, otherwise very good.   Ref: 53031 
£40
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Hall, Marcia B.: Renovation and Counter-Reformation: Vasari and Duke Cosimo in Sta Maria Novella and Sta Croce 1565-1577. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1979. First edition. 4to. (284 x 224 mm), pp. xxvi, 200 + plates (113). 6 architectural figures to text. Black cloth, red label to spine, gilt-lettering. Dust-jacket, price-clipped and with small 'Dillons' price sticker to front flap. A fine copy: just a hint of dusting to edges otherwise as new. In the series Oxford-Warburg Studies.   Ref: 53080 
£75
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Hughes, H. Stuart: Consciousness and Society: The Reorientation of European Social Thought 1890-1930. Brighton: Harvester Press, 1979. 8vo., pp. xi, [i], 433, [i], [xv], [i]. Dark grey cloth, silver title to spine. Headcap a little creased, very good. Reprint. First published in the UK in 1959 by MacGibbon & Kee.   Ref: 51503 
£20
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Jones, Martin: Colonel Leake in the Mani. A Digest of Chapters 7, 8 and 9 of William Martin Leakes's Travels in the Morea (London, 1830). Brighton, Sussex, Book Guild Publishing, 2012. First edition of this abridgement. Small 8vo., pp. xxii, 105. Black cloth, gilt-lettered. Dust-jacket. Fine.   Ref: 53030 
£25
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Mandeville, John: The Voiage and Travaile of Sir John Maundevile, Kt.. Which treateth of the Way to Hierusalem; and of Marvayles of Inde, with other Ilands and Countryes. Now publish'd entire from an Original MS. in the Cotton Library. London: printed for Woodman and Lyon in Russel-Street Covent-Garden, and C. Davis, in Hatton-Garden, 1727. 8vo., pp. xvi, 384, [xvi]. Contents bound at rear with Index, rather than as usual after the Editor's Preface. Title-page in red and black, woodcut head- & tail-pieces and initials. Occasional foxing, a few ink spots and smudges, first and final leaves a little dusty. Contemporary Cambridge-style panelled calf, recently rebacked with older red morocco gilt spine label retained, board edges and corners repaired, endpapers replaced with armorial bookplate slightly visible beneath front paste-down. A little rubbed but a very good, soundly repaired copy. Ownership inscription of Wm. Leaker of Liverpool at head of Editor's Preface (A2). First appearing in France c.1357 as Voyages de Jehan de Mandeville Chevalier, the name of this work's true author remains unknown. It tells the story of the narrator's supposed world travels and was enormously popular: there were further French versions, as well as translations into German, English, Italian, Dutch, Spanish, Irish, Danish, and Czech. 'Altogether over 250 manuscripts survive in twenty-two versions. In England alone there were four Latin and four English translations and a rhymed version.' (ODNB) 'Sir John Mandeville' claims to be an English knight, born in St Albans, who departed on his travels in 1322. However, there is no historical evidence for his adventures, and it appears that at least 90% of the narrative of the Voyages can be traced back to preexisting written sources. So who was the real author? Examination of the original French text is revealing. M.C. Seymour posits 'that the author had no knowledge of St Albans but was a fluent French-speaker; that he composed his work c.1357 in a large, almost certainly ecclesiastical, library; that he was an ecclesiastic, with a cleric's knowledge of the Bible, and probably a member of a regular order; that he was a fluent reader of Latin but lacked any knowledge of Greek or Arabic; that he was an informed and intelligent reader of books describing the Holy Land and other foreign parts; that he had mastered the theories of Sacrobosco and his commentators, possibly at the University of Paris, on the rotundity of the world and was aware of the possibility of circumnavigation; that he had never travelled to the lands he describes; that he was aware of current French accounts of foreign lands and was in a position to launch his own work into the mainstream of the Parisian book-trade.' (ODNB) This anaylsis presents Jean le Long (d.1388) as a likely candidate. As librarian of the Benedictine abbey church of St Bertin at St Omer (in France but then under English rule and on the main route between Calais and Paris) he would have had access to genuine travellers and pilgrims visiting the Mediterranean and the Near East who would have used the route and stayed at the abbey. '[The abbey's] library contained all the works used by Mandeville in the compilation of the Voyages, including the comparatively scarce French translation of the Directorium ad faciendum passagium transmarinum made by the hospitaller Jean de Vignay (c.1340).' (ODNB) ESTC T100821   Ref: 51726 
£650
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