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Burton, Janet E. (ed.): English Episcopal Acta V: York, 1070-1154. Oxford University Press for the British Academy, 1988. 8vo., pp. li, 152 + 4 plates. Red cloth, gilt; a little bumping and scratching, a few minor marks. Very good.   Ref: 42447 
£24
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Burton, William: A Commentary on Antoninus his Itinerary, or Journies of the Romane Empire, so far as it Concerneth Britain [...] London: printed by Tho. Roycroft (for) Henry Twyford, and T. Twyford, 1658. Small folio (285 x 190mm), pp. [xx], 266, [vi] + 2 plates: portrait frontispiece (by Hollar) and double-page map. Lacking single-leaf 'Preface to the Reader' (but see below). Title-page in red and black, woodcut initials, illustrations in the text, errata to final leaf verso. Small burn-hole to pp.33-4 just touching a few letters, pp. 141-2 creased during binding, very occasional spotting and a few slight smudges, front and rear blanks darkened at edges. Contemporary calf, gilt-ruled panels with various mottled effects, all edges gilt, rebacked with dark brown morocco, original spine label retained. Spine rubbed, a few chips, inner hinges relined with tape, marbled front pastedown but no marbled flyleaf. Armorial bookplate of Robert N. Pemberton and bookplate of T.H. Ellison to front pastedown. Underneath the Pemberton plate a piece of paper crossed through in ink, possibly patching a removed third bookplate. Latin annotation in an old hand to preliminary blank. ESTC calls for 22 pages of preliminaries but a number of copies, including those in St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle and others in libraries and sale records, have only 20 pages, being without the single-leaf 'Preface to the Reader'. This leaf, a singleton signed 'a', may have been more frequently omitted because the 'Catalogue of Authors' which would follow it is also signed 'a'. William Burton (1609-1657) is sometimes confused with another of the same name, the younger brother of Robert Burton and author of 'The Description of Leicestershire', but this Burton was more adept at philology. He died of palsy shortly before the completion of this work. ESTC R6432; Wing B6185   Ref: 49120 
£750
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Caesar, Gaius Julius: (Montanus, Arnoldus; Scaliger, Joseph Juste, eds,:) [Opera] Quae Extant, Cum selectis variorum commentariis, quorum plerique novi, opera et studio Arnoldi Montani. Accedunt Notitia Galliae et notae auctiores ex autographo Iosephi Scaligeri. Amstelodami [Amsterdam]: ex officina Elzeviriana, 1661. 8vo., pp. [xvi], 918, [xxxii] + folding map. Includes engraved allegorical title-page and 4 further full-page engravings. Woodcut initials and head- and tail-pieces. Sporadic light dampstaining near fore- and tail-edges, short closed tear to head of N4 affecting a couple of letters. Contemporary dark brown calf, raised bands, short gilt title to spine, boards with blind-tooled double filet borders and small corner tools, edges lightly sprinkled reddish brown. Paste-downs lifted, revealing printed binder's waste. Slight vertical crease to spine, joints a little worn with the upper just starting to crack at each end, lower board bumped at corners with a little surface loss. Overall, very good indeed. To ffep, pencilled inscription V.J.A. Flynn, Wells dated 27 7 1963. At head of leaf *2r, ownership inscription of J. Campbell in an old hand. 'Volume bien exécuté, mais que l'on ne recherche plus guere. Daniel Elzevir a réimprimé ligne pour ligne en 1670' (Willems). Montanus (c.16251683) (the name being a Latinised form of van den Berg or van Bergen) studied theology at Leiden University and later became headmaster of the Latin School at Schoonhoven. Willems 1266   Ref: 52225 
£300
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[Calverley, Charles Stuart]: Verses and Translations. Cambridge; London: Deighton, Bell, and Co.; Bell & Daldry, 1862. First edition. 8vo., pp. vi, 203, [i]. Occasional light foxing mostly affecting first few leaves. Contemporary dark red cloth, gilt title to spine, top edge a bit dusty. Spine cocked, a bit rubbed, endcaps beginning to fray, cloth lifting slightly from centre of upper board. Still a good copy Ownership inscription of Geo. P. Howes. Pemb. Coll., August 1862 to half-title. Obituary of the author pasted to front paste-down. To the title-page, beneath the line 'by C.S.C.', Howes has added 'C.S. Calverley, M.A., Fellow of Christi Coll. Cambridge.' A collection of original verses, and translations from Horace, Virgil, Theocritus, Lucretius and Homer. Charles Stuart Calverley (formerly Blayds) (18311884)was famous during his time as a pupil at Harrow School for his athleticism and his incredible ability to memorise books of the Iliad at short notice. His talent for writing Latin verse was apparent at an early age and won him a scholarship to Balliol College, Oxford, in 1850. 'There he won the chancellor's prize in 1851 for a Latin poem, which confirmed his high academic standing. However, he was sent down in January 1852 for disciplinary offences involving excessive drunkenness and the illicit keeping of dogs in his rooms. In the following October he entered Christ's College, Cambridge, having changed his name from Blayds to Calverley to evade the disgrace following him from Oxford. He won the Craven scholarship in 1854, the Camden medal in 1853 and 1855, the Browne medal (Greek ode) in 1855, and the members' prize for a Latin essay in 1856, graduating second class in the classical tripos that year. Two years later he was elected a fellow of Christ's. His academic success was the more remarkable because his inherent laziness and love of socializing prevented him from studying regularly. His friends had to drag him out of bed by force, or lock him in his rooms to ensure that he concentrated on his work. He made friends with many prominent members of his college, including professors John Robert Seeley, Walter William Skeat, and John Hales, Walter Besant, and Dr Robert Liveing. His parodies and other humorous verses were well known among fellow students by the time of the publication of Verses and Translations in 1862. This collection of gently parodic poems concentrated upon a comfortable and leisured upper-middle-class world and became extremely popular. In 1894 a fourteenth edition was published, and the book was issued as a Pocket Book Classic twenty years after his death. The Athenaeum wished that 'some of our prolific small poets would write as good poetry in earnest as Mr Calverley does in play'.' (ODNB)   Ref: 52032 
£20
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Campbell, Emma & Mills, Robert, eds.: Rethinking Medieval Translation. Ethics, Politics, Theory. Woodbridge, Suffolk: D.S. Brewer, 2012. First edition. 8vo., pp. xii, 292. Laminated boards, very small mark to ffep, a little shelf wear, otherwise near fine.   Ref: 51915 
£25
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Campbell, Stephen J.: Cosmé Tura of Ferrara. Style, Politics and the Renaissance City, 1450-1495. London: Yale University Press, 1997. First edition. 4to., pp. xii, 208. Blue cloth, silver lettered, almost fine. Dust-jacket, shelf wear, very good.   Ref: 52100 
£30
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Campbell, Thomas: The Pleasures of Hope, with Other Poems. Edinburgh: printed for Mundell, Doig, & Stevenson; London: J. Murray, 1808. 9th edition. 8vo., pp. [vi], 134, 17, [i] + 4 plates. Sporadic foxing largely affecting plates. Contemporary tan tree calf, gilt double-lines to spine, traces of missing label. Upper joint splitting but cords holding firm, Spine rubbed and a bit chipped but still good overall. Ownership inscription to title-page: 'Letitia Prichard's, October 10th 1814'. On 27 April 1799 Mundell published Campbell's The Pleasures of Hope. It was an immediate success, and created eager expectations of future greatness. [...] The poem's popularity is an indication of the prevailing taste, still far more at ease with eighteenth-century didactic poetry than with the innovations of Wordsworth and Coleridge's Lyrical Ballads. But the poem was also fortunate in its timing. It was peculiarly welcome to those in sympathy with political reform who were at their most despondent over the bloodshed of the French Revolution. Campbell's poem found ways of asserting radical sentiments that avoided the deadly charge of association with 'French principles'. He denounced the destroyers of Polish liberty, and breathed vengeance on the oppressors of India and supporters of the slave trade. A second part was equally welcome in its rejection of a scepticism that reduced humanity to a 'frail and feverish being of an hour' (The Pleasures of Hope, line 338). But Campbell never had confidence that he could sustain the reputation thus early established. He was unable to develop his next poetical project, a celebration of Edinburgh to be called 'The Queen of the North', beyond a few fragments.' (ODNB)   Ref: 51823 
£40
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Canevaro, Mirko: (Harris, E.M.:) The Documents in the Attic Orators. Laws and Decrees in the Public Speeches of the Demosthenic Corpus. Oxford University Press, 2013. First edition. 8vo., pp. xviii, 389 + 5 tables. Dark blue cloth, gilt-lettered to spine.   Ref: 50280 
£45
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Cardwell, Edward (ed.); Cranmer, Thomas. The Reformation of the Ecclesiastical Laws as Attempted in the Reigns of King Henry VIII, King Edward VI and Queen Elizabeth. Oxford University Press, 1850. 8vo., pp. lviii, 344, 36. Final 36 pages comprise a Clarendon Press publisher's list. Some pages unopened at top edge. Very occasional pencil underlining. Brown cloth, worn paper labels to spine, endcaps worn and frayed, sunned, corners bumped. Hinges cracked, some foxing to r.f.e.p.. Engraved bookplate to front paste-down with added ownership inscription of P.A. Slack and some pencil notations. 'A new edition' with an introduction in English and the original text of 1571 in Latin.   Ref: 41525  show full image..
£50
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Carlyle, Thomas: The Letters and Speeches of Oliver Cromwell. London: Methuen and Co., 1904. 3 vols., 8vo., pp. lxii, 523; xii, 557; xiii, 604. Title pages in red and black. Very light intermittent foxing. Green cloth, gilt. Spines sunned, head- and tail caps creased with small tears to vol. II. Tail edges uncut and foxed, dusting to head edge. Very good. Gift inscription to Sybil A. Lucas from Mr Claude Montefiore, Feb. 8th 1911 to f.f.e.p. vol. I. Ownership inscription of P.A. Slack, March 1973 in pencil to f.f.e.p. of each volume. The inscription notes that this set was a gift to Ms Lucas from the scholar and founder of Liberal Judaism Claude Montefiore (18581938), though we do not believe the handwriting to be his. His sister Alice married into the Lucas family, so Sybil was perhaps a relative of hers.   Ref: 41708 
£45
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