Antiquarian Booksellers Association
Unsworth's Booksellers
International League of Antiquarian Booksellers

Petronius: (Walsh, P. G., trans.:) The Satyricon. Translated with Introduction and Explanatory Notes by P. G. Walsh. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996. First edition thus. 8vo., pp. lii, [ii], 212. Black cloth, gilt-lettered. Edges lightly dusted otherwise fine. Dust-jacket, spine very lightly faded, otherwise very good. "Newcastle under Lyme School" stamped to ffep.   Ref: 53045 
£20
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Polignac, Melchior de: Anti-Lucretius, sive de Deo et Natura, libri novem. Parisiis [Paris]: Apud Hippolytum-Ludovicum Guerin, & Jacobum Guerin 1747. 2 vols., 8vo., pp. [ii] xxx [ii] 180; [iv] 181-450 + frontispiece. Without half-title in first volume. Some light browning and spotting. Contemporary calf, neatly rebacked with old green morocco gilt labels preserved, corners and hinges renewed, old leather scratched and slightly worn around the sides. A posthumously published poem in the Lucretian style offering a Christian and Cartesian refutation of Lucretius and Epicurean philosophy. Cardinal Polignac's (1661-1742) philosophy is "questionable, but the poem is, in form, the best imitation of Lucretius and Virgil extant" (Catholic Encyclopedia). Brunet IV 777.   Ref: 25031 
£200
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Pormann, Peter E.: The Oriental Tradition of Paul of Aegina's Pragmateia. Leiden: Brill, 2004. First edition. 8vo., pp. xix, 337. Laminated boards. A hint of shelf-wear to edges, otherwise still fine. Volume 29 in the Brill series: Studies in Ancient Medicine.   Ref: 53090 
£60
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Reynolds, Jack: The Great Paternalist. Titus Salt and the Growth of Nineteenth-Century Bradford. London: Maurice Temple Smith in association with The University of Bradford, 1983. 8vo., pp. 382. Black cloth, silver lettering. Dustwrapper slightly creased. Very good.   Ref: 51389 
£12
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Riedweg, Christoph: (Rendall, Steven, trans.:) Pythagoras: his Life, Teaching, and Influence. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2005. First edition thus. 8vo., pp. xi, 184. Black cloth, silver-lettered to spine. Dust-jacket. Fine. Translated from the German first edition of 2002.   Ref: 53067 
£20
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Rohan, [Henri] Duke of: (H[unt], H[enry] trans.:) A Treatise of the Interest of the Princes and States of Christendome. Written in French by the Most Noble and Illustrious Prince, the Duke of Rohan. London: printed by Ric. Hodgkinsonne, 1641. First London edition of this English translation. 12mo., pp.[xxiv], 59, [vii], 146, [iv]. Woodcut initials and decorations. Ink blot to p.121 obscuring a few letters, ink blot to fore-edge bleeding onto margins a little but never reaching text. Contemporary tan sheep with remains of original spine and old paper label retained, recent red spine label with gilt title, edges sprinkled red. A bit scuffed and scraped with small area of surface loss to lower board, endpapers renewed with several pencilled booksellers notes. A very good copy overall. Recent bookplate of Robert J. Hayhurst to front paste-down. Multiple ownership inscriptions of Francis Drake to initial blank, title-page, first leaf of text and other points throughout. We believe this Francis Drake to be the Second Baronet (1617-1662), politician and Colonel of the Horse who fought in the Parliamentary army during the English Civil War. He was the great-nephew of the more famous explorer of the same name. First published anonymously in Paris in 1634, it was 1638 before the Duc de Rohan's name was added to the title. Hunt's English translation was first published in Paris in 1640, with this London edition following a year later. A Treatise of the Interest... is 'a compact reflection on European international affairs' offering 'pithy advice to rulers regarding what courses of action best served the aims of security and influence, in light of the precarious balance of power between Spian and France in its time.' (Mathiowetz, Appeals to Interest (2011) p.68) Wing R1868   Ref: 51399 
£400
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Royle, Trevor: The British Civil War: The Wars of the Three Kingdoms 1638 - 1660. New York and Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan 2004. 8vo., pp. xiii, [v], 888. Black boards, gilt-lettered. Internally clean, mild shelf-wear to edges with one tiny dent to outer, very good indeed. Dust-jacket, almost fine.   Ref: 53019 
£24
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Rymer, Thomas: The Tragedies of the Last Age, Consider'd and Examin'd by the Practice of the Ancients, and by the Common Sense of all Ages in a Letter to Fleetwood Shepheard, Esq. London: Printed and are to be sold by Richard Baldwin [...] 1692. 2nd edition. 8vo., pp. [xvi], 144. Imprimatur leaf opposite title page dated July 17 1677, half-page printer's advertisement to final leaf verso. Fore-edge corner of title-page repaired at head, small rust mark near head of p.1, closed tear to bottom edge pp. 39-40 affecting bottom 4 lines of text but with no loss, a little grubby towards edges, occasional spots of foxing. Recent half tan morocco, raised bands and gilt title to spine, marbled boards, edges coloured red, endpapers renewed. Spine lightly sunned, a little dusty, very good. An MS note on Thomas Rymer to the imprimatur leaf recto; to the verso, inscription of (Charles?) Callan dated 1785, 'Ex. Lib.' with the name then removed, and a small note '2nd part never published'. The title-page identifies this as 'Part I', but in fact the old note is correct that no further parts were published. The first edition appeared in 1678 without 'Part I' on the title page. In this critical essay Thomas Rymer (1642/3–1713) identifies what he believes to be 'the choicest and most applauded English Tragedies of that last age; as Rollo; A King and No King; the Maid's Tragedy, by Beaumont and Fletcher; Othello, Julius Cæsar, by Shakespeare; and Cataline by Worthy Ben', and considers them in the context of classical tragedy. 'Rymer managed to rehearse the plots of the first three plays (Rollo is of uncertain authorship) and to analyse the plays according to his views on how tragedy should be written. He advocated strict compliance with the theory of decorum—characters were stereotyped, with soldiers being courageous; women, modest. Poetical justice demanded that the good be rewarded, the evil punished. Plots should not be improbable; plays should have a moral.' (ODNB) Indeed, Rymer is credited with coining the expression 'poetic justice'. ESTC R7998; Wing R2431   Ref: 52268 
£225
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[Sappho; Alcaeus:] Page, Denys (ed. & comm.): Sappho and Alcaeus. An Introduction to the study of Ancient Lesbian Poetry. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1975. Fifth impression. 8vo., pp. ix, 340. Red boards, gilt-lettered, light crease to spine, endcaps just starting to wear, top edge a little foxed and dusted, very good. Ownership inscription "Bill Huntington" to ffep. Some unobtrusive pencil underlining to text. First published 1955.   Ref: 53061 
£30
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Scott, W. S.: Green Retreats. The Story of Vauxhall Gardens 1661-1859. London: Odhams Press, 1955. 8vo., pp. 128 + plates. Illus. to text. 1.5cm surface abrasion to 'General prospect' plate, otherwise internally intact and clean. Green cloth, a little discoloured towards edges. Dust-jacket, torn along fold, frayed at corners, clumsily reinforced inside spine, creased at edges with slight loss, white rear cover somewhat grubby. Still a useful reading copy. With sixteen pages of "charming" illustrations.   Ref: 53005 
£18
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