Antiquarian Booksellers Association
Unsworth's Booksellers
International League of Antiquarian Booksellers

Bellamy, J.G.: The Law of Treason in England in the Later Middle Ages. Cambridge University Press, 1970. 8vo., pp. xviii, 266. Cloth, gilt-lettered, edges dusted. Dust-jacket, browning to spine, shelf wear. Very good. Illegible ownership inscription in pencil to ffep. Cambridge Studies in English Legal History.   Ref: 50837 
£30
enquire
Bene?, Carrie E.: Urban Legends: Civic Identity and the Classical Past in Northern Italy, 1250?1350. University Park, PA: Penn State University Press, 2011. 8vo., pp. 296. 22 b/w illustrations. 5 maps. Hardback. Dust-jacket. New: unopened in publisher's shrink-wrap.   Ref: 53376 
£12
enquire
Benner, Erica: Be Like the Fox: Machiavelli's Lifelong Quest for Freedom. New York: W. W. Norton, 2017. First American edition. 8vo., pp. xxii, 360. Hardback: cream cloth-backed beige boards, gilt-lettered to spine. Dust-jacket. Unused, a tiny black dot to top edge and a hint only of shelf-wear: a fine copy. Dust-jacket subtitled 'Machiavelli in His World'.   Ref: 53854 
£10
enquire
Beresford, Guy: Caldecote: The Development and Desertion of a Hertfordshire Village. The Society for Medieval Archaeology, 2009. First edition. Folio (280 x 212 mm), pp. xi, 267. Illustrations to text. Paperback. Light shelf-wear, very good. The Society for Medieval Archaeology Monograph 28.   Ref: 53591 
£25
enquire
Berkhofer, Robert F., III: Day of Reckoning: Power and Accountability in Medieval France. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2004. First edition. 8vo., pp. vi, 270. Hardback: black cloth, gilt-lettered to spine. Dust-jacket. Unread, a hint only of shelf-wear: almost as new.   Ref: 53634 
£25
enquire
Bernard of Clairvaux, St.: (Horstius, Jakob Merlo ed.): [...] Opera omnia: nunc demum in V tomos [...]. Coloniae Agrippinae [Cologne]: apud Ioannem Kinchivm sub Monocerote veteri, 1641. 6 parts in 1 vol. Folio, pp.[xx], 120, 59, [i]; 143, [i]; [iv], 272; [iv], 139, [i]; [xii], 140; [viii], 384; [iv], 92, 16, [84] + additional engraved frontispiece. Half-title, title-page in red and black with woodcut device, woodcut headpieces and initials. Some light toning, occasional foxing with Part I especially foxed, a few wax spots, some dampstaining to fore-edge margin at rear. Small piece missing from lower margin Part 2 leaf A3, not affecting text, a few small paper repairs. Contemporary vellum over wooden boards, faint ink title and remains of paper labels to spine, blind-tooled borders, frames and centrepiece, recent metal clasps. Cloth reinforcement to front hinge, small repair at tail of spine, a little grubby but very good overall. To title-page: illegible ex libris inscription at head, and library ink stamp 'Studiehuis Minderbroeders Nijmegen'. Saint Bernard (1090-1153) was Abbot of Clairvaux, one of the most prominent centres of the Cistercian Order. In the General Preface to his Life and Works of St Bernard, Abbott of Clairvaux (1889), John Mabillon writes: "?in 1641 appeared the best and most accurate [edition] of all, that of James Merlon Horst, a most pious and learned man. That edition threw all others into the shade, and was reprinted frequently. [?] He had submitted the whole of the works to exact and severe criticism, and divided them into six volumes, of which the first contained the Letters; the second the Sermons de Tempore and de Sanctis; the third the sermons in Cantica; the fourth various Treatises; the fifth whose writings which are not by S. Bernard; and the sixth, those of the two disciples of the Holy Doctor, Gilbert and Guerric. It is he, also, who divided the Treatises into chapters and sections, and has prefixed analytical summaries to each Letter and Treatise. He spared neither labour nor expense to procure all the editions of S. Bernard which he could find in the libraries of different countries, although he was not successful in obtaining some of the works of that Father, of which Possevin and others have given a list. Besides these a great many introductions are added, the life of S. Bernard in seven books, with various Elogia of the Saint, and a chronology. Finally, he has inserted lengthy Notes, besides those shorter ones which are inserted in the margin throughout the work, with very full Indexes of the places of Scripture, of subjects, and of the names mentioned by S. Bernard. The reader cannot help recognising the immense labour with which he has endeavoured to make this edition absolutely accurate. Unfortunately the work of the printer has not altogether corresponded to his wishes. This learned man was preparing an edition more complete and more careful still when he died, on the 20th April, 1644." (p.8).   Ref: 54272 
£450
enquire

Bertramus, Bonaventura Cornelius: De Republica Ebraeorum, recensitus commentarioque illustratus opera Constant. L'Empereur ab Oppijck. Lugduni Batavorum [Leiden]: Ex officina Ioannis Maire, 1641. 16mo., pp. [xlviii], 452, [xxiv]. Title-page in red and black with printer's device, woodcut initials. With final blank. Small ink smudge to title-page, internally very good. Contemporary vellum, title inked to spine, board edges slightly overlapped, all edges red. Vellum a little yellowed and spine darkened, but very good. 'Cornwell House' inkstamp to ffep. Originally published as 'De politia Iudaica, tam civili quam ecclesiastica' in Geneva in 1580, this popular work on Hebrew history and traditions was often reissued. The author, Bonaventure Corneille Bertram(1531-1594), originally from Thouars in France, was professor of Hebrew at Geneva and Lausanne.   Ref: 54523  show full image..
£250
enquire
Billows, Richard A.: Marathon: How One Battle Changed Western Civilization. New York & London: Overlook Duckworth, 2010. First edition. 8vo., pp. 304. Maps, Family Trees, and illustrations to text. Hardback: quarter red cloth-backed black cloth boards, black-lettered to spine. Outer edge uncut, as issued, remainder mark to bottom edge. Dust-jacket. Jacket creased along top edge, light signs of use, still very good.   Ref: 54199 
£12
enquire
Bishop, C.H.: Old Folkestone Pubs. Old inns, taverns and hotels of the ancient borough of Folkestone. West Mailing: Kent County Council, 1979. First edition. 4to, pp. 107, with photographic illustrations. Slight browning, the odd spot, a very good copy. Booklet, binder's tape to spine over pictorial wrappers, a little yellowed and spotted, but still good.   Ref: 53509 
£25
enquire

Blackmore, Richard: Prince Arthur. An Heroick Poem. In ten books; [bound with] King Arthur. An heroick poem in twelve books. London: Printed for Awnsham and John Churchil; [ditto] and Jacob Tonson, 1696; 1697. 1696; 1697. Third edition; first edition. 2 works bound as 1. Folio, pp. [xx], 296, [iv]; [ii], xvii, [i], 343, [ix]. Publisher's catalogue at end of Preface (i.e. p.xx), index at the end of each work. Intermittent damp-staining toward gutter especially to the second work, occasional light foxing, a few faint smudgy marks. Contemporary brown calf, raised bands with recent red Morocco gilt spine label added, blind-tooled borders and frames to boards, edges faintly sprinkled red, endpapers renewed. Spine repaired at head and tail, joints split but cords holding firm, scuffs and scrapes, edges worn, corners frayed, still a good, sound copy. To the title-page, inscriptions of Ed. Southcott and Charles (D?) Sharpe both in old hands. Third edition of Prince Arthur, Richard Blackmore's celebration of William III in the form of an epic based on The Aeneid and using historical material from Geoffrey of Monmouth. (The first edition appeared in 1695 and the second in the same year with an added index). It is found here bound with King Arthur in its first edition of 1697. Two variants exist, this copy having "near the Inner-Temple-gate" in the imprint. Physician and epic poetry enthusiast Blackmore (1654-1729) is now primarily remembered as an object of satire. In 1700 he was accused by John Dryden of being not only a plagiarist but also a poet whose work read to the rhythm of wagon wheels because it had been written in the back of hackney cabs on journeys between patients (The Pilgrim, prologue). Having used Virgil as his model for Prince Arthur and Milton for King Arthur, Blackmore was less successful in his emulation of other poets in subsequent works. He became the target of particular scorn from Pope in The Dunciad (1728), which immortalised him as 'Neverending Blackmore', a poet so boring he could send even lawyers to sleep. ESTC R23258; Wing B 3082.   Ref: 54534  show full image..
£750
enquire