Antiquarian Booksellers Association
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International League of Antiquarian Booksellers

Gransden, Antonia: Historical Writing in England c.550-c.1307. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1974. First edition. 8vo., pp. xxiv, 610. Blue cloth, top edge blue, now faded, otherwise fine. Dust-jacket, with the fading to spine usual to this volume but still very good.   Ref: 53006 
£60
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Harris, Robert: Lustrum. London: Hutchinson, 2009. First edition, first printing. 8vo. Black cloth, gilt-lettered, fine. Dust-jacket, laminate towards top corner of upper board lifted (along with the bookshop sticker - presumably - previously adhered to it) still very good. The second volume in Harris' fictional 'Cicero' trilogy.   Ref: 53012 
£12
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Harvey, Barbara: Westminster Abbey and its Estates in the Middle Ages. Oxford at the Clarendon Press, 1977. First edition. 8vo., pp. xii, 499. Black cloth. Slight bump to upper board at bottom of joint, a hint of shelf-wear, otherwise fine. Dust-jacket, price-clipped, sun-faded to spine, a couple of chips, one with slight loss at top of upper joint, otherwise very good.   Ref: 53008 
£40
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[Historiae Augustae] Historiæ Augustæ Scriptores Sex. Aelius Spartianus, Julius Capitolinus, Aelius Lampridius, Vulcatius Gallicanus, Trebellius Pollio et Flavius Vopiscus. Ad Optimas Editiones Collati Praemittitur Notitia Literaria Accedit Index Studiis Societatis Bipontinae. s.n. [Zweibrüecken]: Biponti ex Typographia Societatis, 1787. 2 vols., 8vo., pp. [ii], xxxvi, 308; [ii], 264, [cii]. Engraved portrait to each title-page (Hadrian to vol. I, Zenobia to vol. II). Title-pages a little grubby towards head, occasional very light foxing. Contemporary vellum, orange and green gilt labels to each spine. Vellum a little greyed with some smudgy marks, top edges darkened, endpapers lightly foxed but still a very good set. Small blue bookseller's label of Galloway & Porter, Cambridge to front paste-down vol. I. A collection of biographies of the emperors from Hadrian to Carinus from the famous Bipont series of editions of Greek and Latin classics. The name originates from Bipontium, the modern Latin name of Zweibrücken or Deux-Ponts in Bavaria, where they began in 1779. Place of publication later transferred to Strasbourg.   Ref: 52218 
£120
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Joyce, James: Ulysses. Paris: Shakespeare and Company, 1926. 8vo. (210 x 160mm), pp.[xii], 735, [v]. Clean and bright internally. Original blue paper publisher's wrappers, edges uncut. Upper joint wholly split, so upper cover only attached where it folds around the outer edges of the first gathering. A bit cocked, spine worn and chipped with some surface peeling, edges tattered with numerous small closed tears and upper fore-edge fold splitting. There have been at least 18 editions of Ulysses, each with variations in their different impressions. Here we find the eighth printing of the first edition, with the 'type entirely re-set', so de facto the second edition. An uncommon find in its original paper wrappers.   Ref: 51744  show full image..
£1000
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[Livy] Livius Patavinus, Titus: (Weissenborn, W[ilhelm]; Müller, H[ermann Johannes], eds.:) Ab Urbe Condita Libri. Berlin: Weidmannsche Buchhandlung, 1879; 1880; 1881; 1882; 1876; 1877; 1877; 1877; 18 10 vols. (some in multiple parts ) bound in 4. 8vo., underlining and scholarly annotations. Lightly toned throughout, occasional light foxing. Contemporary half dark brown sheep, raised bands and gilt titles to spines, brown marbled paper boards, edges sprinkled red. Spines lightly rubbed but surprisingly sturdy for sheep, edges a little worn. A very good, scholarly set. To each front paste-down a tiny blue Blackwell's of Oxford label, each near-obscuring a small inkstamp beneath. To title-pages of vols. II-IV, pencil inscription of Louis C. Purser; to vol.II he adds the date May 1883, to vol. III he adds 'Trinity College, Dublin' and to vol. IV he adds the later date Aug. 1883. He also adds annotations, only a few to vols. I-II but far more to vols. III-IV. Louis Claude Purser (1854–1932) was an Irish classical scholar who spent his whole career at Trinity College. The work for which he is best remembered is his edition of Cicero's letters, which began in 1882 when he assisted Tyrell with the second volume of The Correspondence of Cicero (1886). His efforts increased during the preparation of each subsequent volume (1890, 1894, 1897, 1899), and by the end of the work he was the predominant contributor. Purser appears to have had an extremely modest and anxious nature, which led him to resign from several academic posts despite the protests of his colleagues. 'Purser's scholarship was marked by a literary gift and historical grasp as well as by minute and exhaustive criticism of text and language, and he will be remembered by The Correspondence of Cicero. His output is impossible to quantify precisely, for besides a critical text of Cicero's letters in the Oxford Classical Texts series (Ad familiares, 1901, and Ad Atticum, 1903), an edition of Apuleius's Story of Cupid and Psyche (1910), work on Sidonius Apollinaris and Prudentius in later years, and contributions to Hermathena and the Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy, much of his work was inextricably involved with that of other scholars, whose books he completed and revised when they were stricken by illness. His completion of the edition of Ovid's Heroides by his colleague Arthur Palmer was praised with uncharacteristic warmth by A. E. Housman.' (ODNB)   Ref: 52199 
£160
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Meyrick, Samuel Rush: A Critical Enquiry into Antient Armour, as it Existed in Europe, but Particularly in England, from the Norman Conquest to the Reign of King Charles II, with a Glossary of Military Terms of the Middle Ages. London: printed by G. Schulze, 13 Poland-Street, for Robert Jennings, No. 2 Poultry; sold by John Ga 1824. First edition. 3 vols., folio, pp. 20; [ii], lxxvii, [iii], 206; [iv], 297; [ii], 147, [cxxxiv] + 80 plates, 73 of which are hand coloured. Additional engraved title-page to each volume, some hand-coloured and gilded initials. Occasional light smudgy marks to margins, engraved title-pages foxed with a little transfer to adjacent leaves. Contemporary half dark green morocco with dark purple textured cloth boards, gilt titles to spines, top edges gilt, marbled endpapers. Endcaps tattered, spines rubbed, corners worn, occasional scrapes and scratches, but still a sound and very good set. South Shields Public Library inkstamps (some dated 1974) to title-pages and several other pages throughout each volume, also an inkstamp to each plate verso. Gilt stamp of the same library to tail of each spine. To front paste-down of vols. I and II: tiny contemporary bookbinder's label of Andrew Reid, Newcastle upon Tyne; small paper label with the letter C printed in red. 'C' label also to vol. III. Samuel Rush Meyrick (1783–1848) was an antiquary and historian specialising in arms and armour. He became a fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in 1810 and published his first work, The History and Antiquities of the County of Cardigan, in the same year. He made regular contributions to Archaeologia, (the Society of Antiquaries' journal) from 1818 until 1830, most of which concerned his particular collecting and antiquarian interests. According to ODNB one of his articles, 'Description of the engravings on a German suit of armour made for King Henry VIII, in the Tower of London' (Archaeologia, 22, 1829) 'is probably the earliest detailed examination of a single armour to have been written'. Around the same time he assisted Thomas Dudley Fosbroke with his Encyclopaedia of Antiquities (1823–5) and contributed to various journals. 'It was during these years that Meyrick began to acquire the collection of arms and armour for which he became famous. His obituary in the Gentleman's Magazine describes it at this time as filling not only 'the garrets, the staircase and the back drawing room' but as even encroaching 'upon the bedrooms'. From the beginning it was conceived of as a scientific collection and it was regularly made available to students. In 1825 it was visited by the artists Eugène Delacroix and Richard Bonnington, who both drew items from the collection and made use of them in later works.' (ODNB) This first edition of A Critical Enquiry into Antient Armour, in three abundantly illustrated volumes, appeared in 1824 and is considered to be Meyrick's greatest work. In 1826 the authorities at the Tower of London consulted him on the arrangement of the national collection of arms and armour (of which he had been severely critical in his Enquiry). Two years later he was asked by George IV to arrange the collection at Windsor Castle. In recognition of his work he was knighted in February of 1832.   Ref: 52411 
£1250
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Morris, Beverley R[obinson].: British Game Birds and Wildfowl. Illustrated with 60 Coloured Plates. London: Groombridge and Sons, 1855. First edition. Large 4to., pp. iv, 252 + 60 coloured plates. Title-page a little stuck to frontispiece at gutter causing slight separation between it and the next leaf, slight separation between 'Harlequin duck' plate and the next leaf (p.247), 'Tufted duck' plate opposite p.243 loosening, occasional foxing mostly to front and rear. Contemporary half red polished sheep, gilt spine with raised bands and green morocco label, brown marbled boards, green endpapers. Joints, endcaps and corners worn, small split at tail of upper joint, rubbed. Still a very good copy overall. Bookplate of James Amphlett of Llandyssil dated 1868, numbered 12. 60 hand-coloured plates as called for. Engraved and printed by Benjamin Fawcett (1808-1893), one of the most highly esteemed English nineteenth century woodblock colour printers.   Ref: 51745 
£1000
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Ormrod, W. Mark: Edward III Newhaven and London: Yale University Press, 2011. First edition. 8vo., pp. xx, 721 + plates. Black cloth. other than a hint of dust to edges, fine. Dust-jacket, very slightly creased but still very good indeed. In the Yale English Monarchs Series.   Ref: 53010 
£28
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Paulus Diaconus; Lipsius, J: Pauli Warnefridi Langobardi Filii, Diaconi Foroiuliensis, De Gestis Langobardorum Libri VI. Ad MS, & Veterum Codicum Fidem Editi; De Recta Pronunciatione Latinae Linguae Dialogus. Lugduni Batavorum [Leiden], Ex Officina Plantiniana, Apud Franciscum Raphelengium, 1595; [c.1586]. 12mo., pp. [xii], 337, [i]; [ii], 96, [viii]. Woodcut device to title page of first work. Slightly toned with some occasional foxing, small scorch mark to text p.16 (no loss of sense), preliminary blanks and one leaf loosening. Some underlining to one page in second section. Later vellum, possibly retaining old boards, ink title to spine, Yapp edges, edges sprinkled red. Endcaps creased, a little darkened at fore-edge but otherwise bright, pastedowns lifting to reveal manuscript binder's waste. Some booksellers notes and a pasted catalogue entry to front paste-down. Two works bound together: the first is the major work of Paul the Deacon, his History of the Lombards, in an edition published by Plantin - the first edited by Fr. Linbenbrog; the second work is an anonymous edition of Lipsius's study on the correct pronunciation of Latin. Adams, p.499   Ref: 46592 
£675
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