Antiquarian Booksellers Association
Unsworth's Booksellers
International League of Antiquarian Booksellers

Leland, John: (Hearne, Thomas, ed.:) The Itinerary of John Leland the Antiquary, in Nine Volumes. The Second Edition: Collated and Improved from the Original MS. With the Addition also of a General Index. Oxford: printed at the Theatre, 1745. Second edition. 9 volumes, 8vo., pp. [xiv], xxv, [i], 146, [ii]; [iv], xvi, 139, [i]; x, 172, [ii]; xvi, 172; xxviii, 166; xviii, 146; xxvi, 143, [i]; xlviii, 104; 45, [i]; xliv, [ii], 134, 83, [i] + 3 plates (2 to vol.II and 1 folding to vol.VIII). Many further illustrations in the text, index to all volumes at rear of vol.VIII. A little occasional light foxing mostly limited to first and final leaves but generally very clean and bright within. Contemporary mottled calf, gilt spines with raised bands, orange morocco title labels (one partially lost), plain gilt borders, edges sprinkled red, marbled endpapers. A little rubbed, top edges slightly dusty, vols. 6, 8 & 9 upper joints just starting at tail but still an exceptionally handsome set. The second edition of the important 'itineraries' of the poet and antiquary John Leland (c.1503-1552), who made a number of trips around England and Wales under some kind of commission from the king to do research in libraries. Continuing his travels he made regular notes intending to produce a number of works, none of which appeared. Nonetheless, 'his undertaking was an extraordinarily ambitious one and marks the beginning of English topographical studies' (ODNB). Leland's notes found their way into the Bodleian and, recognising their importance, sub-librarian Thomas Hearne (1678-1735) arranged for their printing in 1710-12. Only 120 copies of the first edition were printed, meaning that it quickly became prohibitively expensive and very difficult to obtain. This second edition, still running to only 350 copies, followed after Hearne's death. The series title-page is dated 1745, while the individual title-pages show 1740. ESTC T135478   Ref: 51571 
£1000
enquire
[Livy] Livius Patavinus, Titus: (Weissenborn, W[ilhelm]; Müller, H[ermann Johannes], eds.:) Ab Urbe Condita Libri. Berlin: Weidmannsche Buchhandlung, 1879; 1880; 1881; 1882; 1876; 1877; 1877; 1877; 18 10 vols. (some in multiple parts ) bound in 4. 8vo., underlining and scholarly annotations. Lightly toned throughout, occasional light foxing. Contemporary half dark brown sheep, raised bands and gilt titles to spines, brown marbled paper boards, edges sprinkled red. Spines lightly rubbed but surprisingly sturdy for sheep, edges a little worn. A very good, scholarly set. To each front paste-down a tiny blue Blackwell's of Oxford label, each near-obscuring a small inkstamp beneath. To title-pages of vols. II-IV, pencil inscription of Louis C. Purser; to vol.II he adds the date May 1883, to vol. III he adds 'Trinity College, Dublin' and to vol. IV he adds the later date Aug. 1883. He also adds annotations, only a few to vols. I-II but far more to vols. III-IV. Louis Claude Purser (1854–1932) was an Irish classical scholar who spent his whole career at Trinity College. The work for which he is best remembered is his edition of Cicero's letters, which began in 1882 when he assisted Tyrell with the second volume of The Correspondence of Cicero (1886). His efforts increased during the preparation of each subsequent volume (1890, 1894, 1897, 1899), and by the end of the work he was the predominant contributor. Purser appears to have had an extremely modest and anxious nature, which led him to resign from several academic posts despite the protests of his colleagues. 'Purser's scholarship was marked by a literary gift and historical grasp as well as by minute and exhaustive criticism of text and language, and he will be remembered by The Correspondence of Cicero. His output is impossible to quantify precisely, for besides a critical text of Cicero's letters in the Oxford Classical Texts series (Ad familiares, 1901, and Ad Atticum, 1903), an edition of Apuleius's Story of Cupid and Psyche (1910), work on Sidonius Apollinaris and Prudentius in later years, and contributions to Hermathena and the Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy, much of his work was inextricably involved with that of other scholars, whose books he completed and revised when they were stricken by illness. His completion of the edition of Ovid's Heroides by his colleague Arthur Palmer was praised with uncharacteristic warmth by A. E. Housman.' (ODNB)   Ref: 52199 
£160
enquire
Lockwood, Dean Putnam: Ugo Benzi. Medieval Philosopher and Physician 1376-1439. The Univesity of Chicago Press, 1951. First edition. 8vo., pp. xvi, 441. Cloth, gilt-lettered, spine slightly cocked, top edge inked red, edges lightly dusted, very good. Ownership inscription in pen of 'Miriam Ervin Reeve 1955' to f.f.e.p.   Ref: 48991 
£18
enquire
Longinus, Dionysius: (Pearce, Zachary, ed.:) [Greek letters] De Sublimitate Commentarius, quem qova versione donavit, Perpetuis Notis illustravit, & partim Manuscriptorum ope, partim conjectura, emendavit (additis etiam omnibus ejusdem Auctoris Fragmentis). Dublini: apud J. Smith & G. Bruce, 1733. Third edition. 8vo., pp. xliv, 372, including engraved frontispiece. Title-page in red and black, woodcut initials and tail-pieces, large engraved head-piece to p.v. A few annotations in an old hand, e.g. p.15. A very light marginal dampstain to lower fore-edge corner from frontis to approx. p.xxxv but generally clean within. Contemporary dark brown calf, gilt spine label, gilt thistle and shelf mark at tail of spine, edges lightly sprinkled red. Headcap neatly repaired, upper joint a little worn but holding firm, upper fore-edge corner bumped with slight creasing. A few small paper repairs to ffep where it was previously stuck to the bookplate. A very good copy. Engraved armorial bookplate of the Charles Perceval (1756–1840), 2nd Baron Arden in the Irish peerage and 1st Baron Arden in the peerage of the UK. Perceval was the older brother of the Prime Minister Spencer Perceval (1762–1812) as well as being a prominent politician himself. He was also a fellow of the Royal Society and the Society of Antiquaries, and a trustee of the Hunterian Museum. Published in the same year in both Dublin and Edinburgh, this Dublin edition appears to be the rarer, COPAC finding only the ESTC listing plus copies at Trinity College Dublin and Glasgow University. The sheets of this edition were in fact printed in the Netherlands and are a separate issue or variant imprint of the 1733 Amsterdam edition of R. & J. Wetstein and G. Smith. Dibdin recommends Pearce's edition (first published in 1724 in London in 4to. format) as 'the true text', praising its 'elegant and erudite notes' and adding that the subsequent 8vo. editions contain 'advantageous corrections and additions'. He records the second London edition of 1732 (the first 8vo.) and Foulis' 'very elegant' 4to. of 1763, but omits this Irish issue. ESTC N28412; Dibdin (4th edn.) II 177-8   Ref: 51610 
£225
enquire
Lucian of Samasota: (Mayne, Jasper, trans.:) Part of Lucian Made English from the Originall. In the Yeare 1638. Oxford: R. Davies, 1664. FIRST PART ONLY. 1st edition 2nd issue, folio, pp. [xvi], 398, [iv] + portrait frontispiece of Lucian signed: W: Faithhorne sculpsit.. As usual pp.162-167 and pp.316-317 are misnumbered as 182-187 and 306, 311 respectively. Woodcut device to title-page, woodcut initials and head- and tail-pieces. Some old repairs to frontis at gutter, to title-page verso (particularly head and tail edges) plus a few other places e.g. head of first dedicatory leaf, M1, Z1, and some other smaller repairs; small worm trail to bottom corner of fore-edge margin roughly pp.202-281, repaired in some places; light browning and possible dampstaining to head and tail edges near front and rear; occasional wax spots and tiny scorch holes, final blank leaf laid down.. Contemporary speckled calf boards neatly rebacked in polished sheep, raised bands and morocco gilt label to spine, blind-tooled borders, edges sprinkled red, endpapers replaced. Endcaps, raised bands and joints rubbed, a little chipping to edges, corners worn, a few light scuffs and scrapes. A good copy, soundly repaired. To the front paste-down: small book label of Charles Whibley. To frontispiece verso: various pen trials and doodled faces, plus inscriptions of Thos. Hartopp and Elizabeth Mallory 'Her Booke, 1694'. To title-page recto: two more inscriptions of Tho. Hartopp, and one of Ralph Welles. To final blank: another inscription of Elizabeth Mallory dated 1694 and another (seemingly in the same handwriting) of Elizabeth Welles; in the same hand a quotation, 'One moment gives Invention to Destroy / What to Rebuild would A whole Age Imploy'. This comes from William Congreve's play The Double-Dealer, which was first produced at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane in November or December of 1693 and first appeared in print the following year. There are also what appear to be faded signatures on the leather of the lower board, though these are illegible. This version, with its title-page dated 1664, seems to be a reissue of the original 1663 first (the title-page of the first issue is dated 1663 and there is no portrait). The second part of the work is not found here; titled "Certain select dialogues of Lucian: together with his true history, translated from the Greek into English. By Mr. Francis Hickes", it has separate pagination, register, and title page with the imprint "printed for Richard Davis,... 1663". It appears that it was also issued separately (Wing L3425). ESTC R23081; Wing L3435   Ref: 52318 
£450
enquire
Lucretius Carus, Titus: De Rerum Natura Libri Sex. Birminghamae [Birmingham]: Johannis Baskerville, 1772. First Baskerville edition. 4to., pp. [ii], 280. Occasional very light spots and smudges but generally bright, gatherings T-Z clean and not foxed as is sometimes the case. Slightly later red straight grain morocco, raised bands, gilt rules and title to spine, plain gilt borders and dentelles, a.e.g., marbled leather-jointed endpapers, green ribbon bookmark bound in. Spine a little darkened, a few tiny scrapes, white dusty marks to board edges at fore-edge. A very good, handsome copy. Tiny, illegible inscription at foot of first page of text, possibly dated 1785, the bottom edge of the letters just shaved off. The first Baskerville edition of Lucretius (a duodecimo followed the next year). In a somewhat backhanded fashion, Dibdin comments that this edition is remarkable for its typographical beauty though nothing else. ESTC T50365; Dibdin II (4th edn.), 203; Gaskell 43; Gordon 20; Schweiger II, 577   Ref: 52288 
£600
enquire
Lyne, R. O. A. M.: Collected Papers on Latin Poetry. Oxford University Press, 2007. First edition. 8vo., pp. xix, 418. Black cloth, silver-lettered. Dust-jacket. The merest hint of shelf-dust; as new. A posthumous collection of articles including one previously unpublished piece.   Ref: 53022 
£70
enquire
Lysias: (Taylor, John, ed.:) Orationes et Fragmenta. Graece et Latine. Ad fidem Codd. Manuscriptorem recensuit, [...] Londini [London]: Ex Officina Gulielmi Bowyer, 1739. 2 vols. in 1, 4to., pp. [viii], xc, 528, [ii], 431-722, [xxvi] (with errors in pagination as usual). Greek and Latin. Leaf Fff4 (ie. pp.415-6) in this copy is the cancelland, showing the original number '39' in the first line of text. A few large, engraved head-pieces, occasional woodcut decorations. Two preliminary blanks a little loose at tail edge, first few leaves slightly creased. Contemporary vellum, raised bands and inked title to spine, all edges coloured red, marbled endpapers. Upper board a bit bowed, a little grubby. A very good, large paper copy. 19th-century armorial bookplate of Sir John Trollope to front paste-down. One of only 100 copies printed on large paper. According to Bowyer's records, 300 copies were printed on Genoa demy, 75 on royal, and 25 on writing royal. "Beautifully and correctly printed by the celebrated Bowyer. This is an incomparable edition, and hardly exceeded by any which this country can boast of" (Dibdin). ESTC T106443; Schweiger I 202; Dibdin (4th edn.) II 213; Brunet III 1257; Graesse IV 314.   Ref: 51885 
£950
enquire
Mandeville, John: The Voiage and Travaile of Sir John Maundevile, Kt.. Which treateth of the Way to Hierusalem; and of Marvayles of Inde, with other Ilands and Countryes. Now publish'd entire from an Original MS. in the Cotton Library. London: printed for Woodman and Lyon in Russel-Street Covent-Garden, and C. Davis, in Hatton-Garden, 1727. 8vo., pp. xvi, 384, [xvi]. Contents bound at rear with Index, rather than as usual after the Editor's Preface. Title-page in red and black, woodcut head- & tail-pieces and initials. Occasional foxing, a few ink spots and smudges, first and final leaves a little dusty. Contemporary Cambridge-style panelled calf, recently rebacked with older red morocco gilt spine label retained, board edges and corners repaired, endpapers replaced with armorial bookplate slightly visible beneath front paste-down. A little rubbed but a very good, soundly repaired copy. Ownership inscription of Wm. Leaker of Liverpool at head of Editor's Preface (A2). First appearing in France c.1357 as Voyages de Jehan de Mandeville Chevalier, the name of this work's true author remains unknown. It tells the story of the narrator's supposed world travels and was enormously popular: there were further French versions, as well as translations into German, English, Italian, Dutch, Spanish, Irish, Danish, and Czech. 'Altogether over 250 manuscripts survive in twenty-two versions. In England alone there were four Latin and four English translations and a rhymed version.' (ODNB) 'Sir John Mandeville' claims to be an English knight, born in St Albans, who departed on his travels in 1322. However, there is no historical evidence for his adventures, and it appears that at least 90% of the narrative of the Voyages can be traced back to preexisting written sources. So who was the real author? Examination of the original French text is revealing. M.C. Seymour posits 'that the author had no knowledge of St Albans but was a fluent French-speaker; that he composed his work c.1357 in a large, almost certainly ecclesiastical, library; that he was an ecclesiastic, with a cleric's knowledge of the Bible, and probably a member of a regular order; that he was a fluent reader of Latin but lacked any knowledge of Greek or Arabic; that he was an informed and intelligent reader of books describing the Holy Land and other foreign parts; that he had mastered the theories of Sacrobosco and his commentators, possibly at the University of Paris, on the rotundity of the world and was aware of the possibility of circumnavigation; that he had never travelled to the lands he describes; that he was aware of current French accounts of foreign lands and was in a position to launch his own work into the mainstream of the Parisian book-trade.' (ODNB) This anaylsis presents Jean le Long (d.1388) as a likely candidate. As librarian of the Benedictine abbey church of St Bertin at St Omer (in France but then under English rule and on the main route between Calais and Paris) he would have had access to genuine travellers and pilgrims visiting the Mediterranean and the Near East who would have used the route and stayed at the abbey. '[The abbey's] library contained all the works used by Mandeville in the compilation of the Voyages, including the comparatively scarce French translation of the Directorium ad faciendum passagium transmarinum made by the hospitaller Jean de Vignay (c.1340).' (ODNB) ESTC T100821   Ref: 51726 
£650
enquire
Meibom, Johann Heinrich: Maecenas, sive de C. Cilnii Maecenatis vita, moribus & rebus gestis: liber singularis. Accessit C. Pedonis Albinovani Maecenati scriptum epicedium, notis illustratum. Lugduni Batavorum [Leiden]: apud Johannem & Danielem Elsevier, 1653. Small 4to. (193 x 155mm), pp. [xii], 186, [viii], 11, [ix], including errata leaf usually lacking. Engraved portrait vignette to title-page, woodcut initials and head-pieces, small numismatic illustration in text. Sporadic light foxing a little heavier to a few leaves. Very neat modern binding, tan quarter calf, raised bands and red morocco gilt title label to spine, marbled boards, edges sprinkled red, endpapers renewed. Very slight shelf wear, a very good copy. An account of the early life of Gaius Cilnius Maecenas (68 BC–8 BC) the famous patron of letters (notably to the new generation of Augustan poets, including both Horace and Virgil), by the German physician and humanist Johann Heinrich Meibom (1590-1655). This copy includes the final errata leaf which, as Willems notes, appears to have been added afterwards and is missing in most examples. Schweiger II, 588; Willems 731   Ref: 52319 
£350
enquire