Antiquarian Booksellers Association
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Angelov, Dimiter G.: Church and Society in Late Byzantium. Kalamazoo: Medieval Institute Publications, 2009. 8vo., pp. 256. Paperback. New: unopened in publisher's shrink-wrap. In the series,"Studies in Medieval Culture".   Ref: 53388 
£10
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Anlezark, Daniel: Water and Fire: the Myth of the Flood in Anglo-Saxon England. Manchester University Press, 2006. 8vo., pp. x, 398. Purple cloth, gilt title to spine, fine. Dust-jacket very slightly shelf worn, near fine. In the Manchester Medieval Literature series (series editors J.J. Anderson and Gail Ashton).   Ref: 51556 
£20
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[Annual] Kennedy, William: (Prout, Samuel, illus.:) The Continental Annual, and Romantic Cabinet for 1832. London: Smith, Elder, & Co., 1832. Large paper. 8vo., p. [x], 313, [i] + frontispiece, additional engraved title-page and 11 further engraved plates. Most plates with their protective tissues neatly excised, one tissue (over 'View in Metz' plate) with a small square cut out. Sporadic foxing, mostly affecting plates and their adjacent leaves. Burgundy textured sheepskin, gilt spine and borders, a.e.g., yellow endpapers. Spine faded with a few scrapes, rubbed, corners worn but a very good, sound copy. To top corner of ffep, tiny blindstamp of Remnant & Edmonds, Binders, Paternoster Row. Recent pencilled ownership inscription to ffep. Inscription to preliminary blank: 'From her brother Jim, with much love, and all best hopes,/ to Clara A. Allan, in memory of 1885./ [illegible place name?]. July 20. 1907.' The illustrator Samuel Prout (1783-1852) was a master of architectural watercolour painting, and was a sometime teacher of John Ruskin. He was appointed 'Painter in Water-Colours in Ordinary' to King George IV in 1829, and afterwards to Queen Victoria.   Ref: 51733 
£100
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[Annual] Roscoe, Thomas: (Harding, J.D., illus.:) (The Landscape Annual for 1832:) The Tourist in Italy. London: Jennings & Chapman, 1832. Large Paper. 8vo., pp. [viii], 286, [x] + engraved frontispiece, additional title-page with engraved vignette, plus 24 further engraved plates. Eight-page publisher's catalogue at rear. Sporadic foxing, some images toned with transfer to their protective tissues but others clean. Textured green sheepskin, gilt title to spine, raised bands, blind-tooled borders, a.e.g., yellow endpapers. Spine a bit faded, slightly rubbed with some wear to corners, small chip to bottom edge of upper board, very good overall. Recent pencilled ownership inscription to ffep, initials E.W. inked to top corner. Tiny binder's label of F. Westley, Friar Street, Near Doctor's Commons (London), at bottom edge of rear paste-down. The third of the publisher's Landscape Annuals.   Ref: 51732 
£100
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Anon. [Lowndes, William:] A Report Containing an Essay for the Amendment of the Silver Coins. London: printed by Charles Bill, and the Executrix of Thomas Newcomb, deceas'd; Printers to the King 1695. First edition. 8vo., pp. 159, [i]. Woodcut initials. Slight dampstain along bottom margin occasionally affecting (though not obscuring) text, title-page a little grubby but otherwise only occasional light spots and smudges. Modern tan half calf, red morocco gilt title label to spine, marbled boards, endpapers renewed. A very good copy in a sound modern binding. The Essay is divided into five distinct points: 'First, Concerning the Standard of the Gold and Silver Coins, and the Establishment of a Just and Reasonable Foot for the Course of the same'; 'Second, Concerning the Present State and Condition of the Gold and Silver Coins'; 'Third, Whether it be or be not Absolutely necessary at this Time to Re-establish the same'; 'Fourth, The Proposing of Means that must be Obtained, and the Proper Methods to be used in and for the Amendment of the Silver Moneys'; 'Fifth, To Consider what must Supply the Commerce, Pay Taxes &c. Whilst the Clipt Money is under its New Fabrication.' (pp.11-13) Lowndes (1652-1724) took office as secretary of the Treasury on 24th April 1695 in the midst of a worsening coinage crisis which the government was already making efforts to resolve. 'The practice of 'clipping' hammered silver coin had reached the point where it was seriously affecting the Treasury's ability to pay its way in the war with France, and in late 1694 confidence in the silver coinage weakened dramatically. A complete reminting of the coinage was now imperative, but the problem facing a House of Commons committee early in 1695 was whether there should be a temporary devaluation in order to stabilize the currency while the old money was reminted, a primary concern being to offset the inevitable loss in the value of tax receipts.' (ODNB) As Lowndes and the philosopher John Locke published opposing views on the subject (Lowndes in favour of devaluation and Locke against) the episode came to be referred to by historians as 'the Locke-Lowndes controversy'. However more recent studies have suggested that the views published here under Lowndes name on behalf of the Treasury were not actually his own. 'In a written report to the Treasury board in January 1695 Lowndes actually ruled out any suggestion of devaluation. While modestly conceding a limited grasp of the complexities behind the issue, he envisaged an immediate loss of some £150,000 in revenue, which would have to be met by a 'public tax', and a worrying increase in the cost of England's military payments abroad.' (Ibid). The Treasury board asked Lowndes to produce a detailed recoinage scheme but, 'since majority opinion on the board favoured devaluation it would appear that Lowndes was instructed to follow the scheme already proposed by the Commons. By mid-September his 'book', A Report Containing an Essay for the Amendment of the Silver Coins, was in Treasury hands. It embodied the Commons committee's resolutions and was fleshed out with much historical detail, but owing to the rapid increase in the market price of silver a devaluation rate of 20 per cent would now be necessary. William III and his ministers acknowledged Lowndes's ingenuity and scholarship but, disagreeing with the Treasury board, saw greater virtue in Locke's arguments for a recoinage at the old standard. Thus it was largely to assist the ministry's own scheme for recoinage in parliament that Lowndes's Report was subsequently published in November 1695, followed by Locke's Further Considerations Concerning Raising the Value of Money. While paying tribute to Lowndes's erudition, Locke was quick to point out that some of his arguments tended in fact to condemn devaluation of any kind. Moreover, the encouragement which Lowndes gave to Locke and other critics to publish their rebuttals of his Report would likewise suggest that Lowndes had never personally favoured devaluation. In January 1696 an act was passed for a recoinage at the existing standard.' (Ibid.) ESTC R39081; Wing (2nd ed.) L3323   Ref: 52379  show full image..
£350
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Appian: (Davies, John, trans.:) The History of Appian of Alexandria, in two parts. The first consisting of the Punick, Syrian, Parthian, Mithridatick, Illyrian, Spanish, and Hannibalick Wars. The Second containing five books of the Civil Wars of Rome... The third edition. London: Printed for John Amery at the Peacock, [...], 1679 Folio, 2 parts in 1, pp. [xiv], 251, [i], 273, [ii]. Title in red and black, woodcut initials and ornaments. First and last four leaves a bit browned and dampstained at margins, title frayed at fore-edge, light age browning throughout, occasional slight marginal foxing, 2B2-3 soiled, long clean tear from fore-edge of 4h2 extending along blank margin. Contemporary full calf, single blind ruled, rebacked with original spine onlaid, scattered loss to covers from binding acid. Modern bookplate of Fox Pointe Collection to front pastedown. The first edition of the second English translation of Appian of Alexandria's important 'Historia Romana'. Written in the 2nd century AD, it spans the origins of Rome to the end of the Republic, with a detailed account of the Civil Wars, which here constitutes the second part. This translation, originally attributed to John Dryden, was produced by John Davies (1627-93) of Kidwelly. After studying at Oxford and Cambridge, and spending some time in France, he was employed by London booksellers as a translator from Latin and French. This copy was in the Fox Pointe Manor Library, a rich collection of 17th-century English imprints gathered by Dr Howard Knohl. ESTC R13368; Hoffmann I, 280.   Ref: 53761  show full image..
£1000
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Armstrong, Elizabeth: Ronsard and the Age of Gold. Cambridge at the University Press, 1968. First edition. 8vo., pp. xiv, 213 + plates. Hardback: light brown cloth with spine gilt-titled on dark green label. Top edge green, a little dusting to each edge. Dust-jacket, price-clipped, a few words of flap-blurb made faint by removal of price-sticker, light creasing to edges. Still, a very good copy.   Ref: 53568 
£10
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Arrowsmith, Aron: Orbis Terrarum Veteribus Noti Descriptio. A Comparative Atlas of Ancient and Modern Geography from Original Authorities, and upon a New Plan, for the use of Eton School. London: Published by the Author, 1828 First edition. Folio. 3 engraved leaves of text, 26 double-page + 1 single-page engraved maps, [1] engraved leaf of text. Engraved title with arms of Eton College, maps with boundaries highlighted in colour, unrelated map of North America inserted within. Uniform slight age browning, edges dusty, marginal ink splash to title and plates 1, 3 and 4, one lower blank corner torn, some thumbing, lower fore-edge a bit softened, very small tears to few edges, margins of one leaf of plate 5 repaired, burn to upper blank margin of two plates, a couple a bit dusty, occasional spotting or slight offsetting. Half calf over marbled boards, original boards with recent utilitarian but unsympathetic rebacking and recornering with tape reinforcement to hinges. Boards rubbed. 19th-century autograph 'Sticks Mi: Magd. Coll. School' and 'H.S. Perris (from E.L.H.) i.3.89' to front pastedown; occasional student's annotations in pencil or marker. A well-read copy of the first edition of this manual of ancient and modern geography, originally prepared for the use of Eton schoolboys. The author, Aron Arrowsmith, son of the major namesake cartographer and printer, achieved some notoriety thanks to this atlas and another on biblical geography. In the present one, each double-page plate features on the left the modern outline of continents and states, and on the right their ancient geography. Europe is divided into Central, Western, Northern and Southern, whereas non-European maps highlight the British possessions, territories under British influence by tribute, protection or subsidy, and territories of independent states. Being an atlas of regions 'known to the ancients', as the title asserts, the maps only cover the Eastern hemisphere; to the Western one is devoted a final map, showing the general outline of the Americas.   Ref: 53314  show full image..
£375
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Ausonius, Decimus Magnus: (Fleury, Julien, ed,; Souchay, Jean Baptiste, ed.:) Opera []. Parisiis: typis Jacobi Guerin, ad Ripam Augustinianorum, 1730. Delphin edition. 2 vols. bound as 1. 4to., pp.[iii], iv-lxvii, [i], 432; [iii], 434-684, [ii], 16, [clii] + 2 plates (engraved title-page by Mathey and 1 further numismatic plate opposite p.667). "Obscoena e textu Ausoniano resecta" and indices at rear. Very clean internally. Later (c.1800) tan sheep neatly rebacked, marbled edges and endpapers. Corners a little worn but a very good copy indeed. Blind embossed coat of arms to each board, of John Bligh, 4th Earl of Darnley (1767-1831) with the motto 'Finem Respice'. Bligh was a British peer and noted amateur cricketer. According to Brunet, a highly regarded edition. Schweiger I, 22; Moss I, 216 and Brunet I, 574   Ref: 52049  show full image..
£350
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Ausonius, Decimus Magnus; Martialis, Marcus Valerius; Catullus, Tibullus & Propertius: Opera, Ex Recognitione Josephi Scaligeri Jul. Caes. F.; Epigrammaton libri XII. Xeniorum liber I. Apopharetorum liber I.; [Works]. [Leiden:] ex officina Plantiniana Raphelengii, 1605; 1606; 1601. 3 works in 1 volume. 24mo., pp. 238, [i]; 272; 213, [iii], includes final blanks to first and last works. Woodcut printer's device to each title-page. Very slightly toned, lower fore-edge corners of leaf N2 of Ausonius and leaf G2 of Catullus torn away though not affecting text apart from the latter's catchword. Contemporary semi-limp vellum, recent red leather and gilt title label to spine, edges coloured red. Both paste-downs lifted, exposing some scraps of vellum MS used as sewing supports. A little cocked, spine slightly creased, a few smudgy marks but very good. A few pencilled bookseller's notes to front endpapers. Small inscription of an illegible name in an old hand to front paste-down recto. 20th-century bookplate ('Georgii Fletcher et Amicorum') to front paste-down verso. Three pocket-sized editions of classical works from the Plantin press, all scarce in the UK with COPAC finding no copies of the Ausonius, one BL copy of the 1606 Martial and only 1587, 1603 and 1613 editions of the Catullus rather than the 1601 found here (WorldCat finds one copy of the 1601 Catullus in Leiden University Library). Schweiger (II, 80) mentions the 1603 edition of Catullus, but no others. Francois Raphelengien joined the Plantin press as a corrector in 1564 and remained there for 25 years until the death of Christopher Plantin, from whom inherited the Leiden branch of the press. Francois died in 1597, followed by his son and heir Christopher only three years later. These works date from the time of his second son Francois II, who was not appointed as printer to the University as his predecessors had been, and who sold the business in 1619.   Ref: 52191  show full image..
£650
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